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Tools, tips and practices to share with teachers
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Rescooped by Sharrock from Empathy Magazine
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We Are Wired to Be Kind: How Evolution Gave Us Empathy, Compassion & Gratitude

We Are Wired to Be Kind: How Evolution Gave Us Empathy, Compassion & Gratitude | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
Empathy, compassion and gratitude — these traits don’t usually spring to mind when you think about Darwinism and natural selection.

 

No, your mind more immediately drifts toward anti-social characteristics like competition, survival of the fittest, and selfishness (as in the “selfish gene”)

 

 But above, on the first day of 2015, UC Berkeley psychologist Dacher Keltner reminds us that evolution can bring out the best in us, and Darwin recognized that. As Darwin wrote in The Descent of Man, the strengthening of our capacity for “sympathy” played a central role in human evolution:


Via Edwin Rutsch
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The Number One Job Skill in 2020

The Number One Job Skill in 2020 | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it
What's the crucial career strength that employers everywhere are seeking -- even though hardly anyone is talking about it? A great way to find out is by studying this list of fast-growing occupations

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Empaticus's curator insight, June 23, 2013 5:20 PM

Can you guess? Not too difficult if you look at the list of jobs on the rise.

Also, it is painfully obvious when that skill is missing.

It´s time for the rise of the homo....

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The Many Faces of Empathy - World of Psychology

The Many Faces of Empathy - World of Psychology | Teacher Tools and Tips | Scoop.it

While empathy doesn’t come in as many varieties as are found in the cereal aisle, it is no more uniform than it is universal. Empathy is generally understood as the ability to appreciate the ideas and feelings of another, even if those ideas or feelings are different from one’s own.

 

It is also volitional — I have to put on someone else’s shoes to be able to walk around in them awhile.

 

Empathy is generally understood as the ability to appreciate the ideas and feelings of another,

even if those ideas or feelings are

different from one’s own.

 

By SUSAN DONNELLY 

 


Via Edwin Rutsch
Sharrock's insight:

This statement says a lot: "Empathy requires that we suspend our own judgments and emotions about a situation or person, and attempt to walk in their shoes, hence the more volitional aspect of true empathy."


This points to the skill-aspect of empathy. What do you do to redirect or turn off your judgments and emotions? We seem to naturally jump to conclusions and judge the actions and decisions of others, so this restraint is somewhat unnatural. The book Crucial Conversations offers a number of actions to take in order to overcome these impulses, but it is also clear that tiredness and stress will make such mental acrobatics difficult to even consider using. There are aikido-like mental moves to reframe discussions or to focus on different goals, but it is clear that a certain amount of training is necessary before one can become competent or to master such skills. The "staying in the moment" processes of being present also has some promise. 

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