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Human Landscapes of Canada

Human Landscapes of Canada | Teach it | Scoop.it
Canada is a massive country, yet it has one of the lowest population densities in the world. Despite this, Canadians have made a wide impact on their land, much of it visible from aerial and satellite photography. Hydroelectric facilities, roads, mines, farms, ports, resource exploration, logging, canals, cities, and towns have altered much of the landscape over the years.

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Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 23, 2015 1:02 AM
http://www.bharatemployment.com/
Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, March 8, 2015 11:20 AM

Un vrai plaisir

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:28 PM

This shows how even small populations can make a big impact on the world from the changes in urbanization.

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Global Shipping Traffic Visualized

As stated in this NPR article: "The video shows satellite tracking of routes superimposed over Google Earth. It focuses on some of the main choke points for international shipping, such as the Strait of Malacca on the southern tip of Malaysia, Suez Canal, the Strait of Gibraltar and Panama Canal. It's a good reminder that about 90 percent of all the goods traded globally spend at least some of their transit time on a ship."

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, mapping, video, visualization.


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Mediterranean Cruise Advice's curator insight, February 25, 2015 6:46 AM

This is amazing to watch.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, February 26, 2015 4:52 AM

A great visual on shipping - Geographies of Interconnections (year 9)

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:24 PM

An important aspect of global trade links and connections. 

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Globalization in a Nutshell

"The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun."


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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:24 AM

Globalization in a Nutshell

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 2, 2014 4:29 PM

Integração seletiva...

Nicole Canova's curator insight, January 18, 7:10 PM
This video does a good job of explaining globalization and the effects it has on transportation, communication, economy, politics, and culture around the world.  It also discusses some of the consequences of the world becoming a smaller place.
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Let’s Talk About Geography and Ebola

Let’s Talk About Geography and Ebola | Teach it | Scoop.it
Why knowing where countries are in Africa matters for how the rest of the world thinks about Ebola.

 

Cultural and media norms that often refer to Africa as one entity rather than an 11.7 million-square-mile land mass comprised of 54 countries and over 1.1 billion people who speak over 2,000 different languages.  This cultural confusion means that, when a dangerous virus like Ebola breaks out, Americans who are used to referring to “Africa” as one entity may make mistakes in understanding just how big of a threat Ebola actually is, who might have been exposed to it, and what the likelihood of an individual contracting it might be.  This Ebola outbreak is wreaking havoc on African economies beyond the three most heavily affected by Ebola, and that damage is completely avoidable. The East and Southern African safari industry provides a good example. Bookings for safaris there — including for the famed Great Migration in Kenya and Tanzania — have plummeted due to the Ebola outbreak. These actions are based in fear, not reality.

 

Tags: Ebola, medical, diffusion, Africa, regions, perspective.


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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 18, 2015 9:36 PM

It doesn't surprise me that the average person doesn't know his geography.  It shocks the hell out of me that a college would put themselves in a situation to look that stupid!  Do your research people.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 2015 5:08 PM

This is another example of stereotyping taking its course through Africa.  Even though I am aware of the size and diversity of Africa, I was guilty of associating Ebola with the whole continent and not just the affected areas.  Same thing goes with the AIDS virus and other things, such as poverty.  Articles are great for people in other parts of the world to read to better educate them on the size and diversity of Africa and that there are many different ways of life in its 54 countries.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:44 AM

The Ebola epidemic over the last year put everyone in the world on high alert, not just those who lived in Sierra Leone and many countries in West Africa. It is important to understand how the virus spread so quickly and the advancements made to treat the virus. Geography played a big part of the spread of the virus. Because Africa, and the countries are far from modern medical technology, many non-profit organizations like Doctors without Borders were dispatched to those affected areas to help show and train physicians there the proper techniques on how to treat infected people with Ebola. That's why on the map one can see a far range of countries who treated infected people in facilities that were built to handle cases of Ebola.

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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


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Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 2014 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:48 PM

Unit 2-Population

 

This video was about the growing population in the world and as a result the growing food demand. This video points out that even though more food production seems like the solution, instead other solutions are more logical. Solutions include reducing wastes, preserving forests, being more productive on current farms and more. It states that farming is a huge business but it goes towards more than growing food for people to eat but also for other things like animals and materials. The worlds population is growing and there needs to be a change in food industries to keep thriving. 

 

This relates to unit 2 about population since it is thinking of ways to adapt to the worlds growing population. By 2050 it is predicted that population will increase by 33% and something has to change about food in order for people to stay fed. There is too much food being wasted that if that could be decreased it could make a huge difference. The video made a good point that it's not that we need more food it's that we need to manage and prioritize production.  

Blayze Padgett's curator insight, January 10, 2017 1:03 PM

The article/video relates to AP Human Geography because it involves Thomas Malthus's theory that population is going to surpass food production if we don't fix our priorities. In my opinion this article makes a very valid point that could be true. We don't exactly need to start more farms and spread agriculture, instead, we should pay attention to our priorities and make the right decisions with the food we harvest from agriculture.

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Waging War Against Global Food Waste

Waging War Against Global Food Waste | Teach it | Scoop.it
National Geographic Emerging Explorer Tristram Stuart wants the world to stop throwing away so much good food.

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Deborah Jones's curator insight, October 25, 2014 9:58 AM

PSA

Rebecca McClure's curator insight, November 15, 2014 11:13 PM

Year 9: Food Security

Alex Lewis's curator insight, November 21, 2014 12:18 PM

I think this is a great idea, and the more we reduce our food waste, the better. We can use this food to feed the starving, which would solve two problems at once. Also, the idea of feeding the excess food to the pigs is a good idea. Not as good as conserving the food to give to the needy though. 

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The Science of Earthquakes

The Science of Earthquakes | Teach it | Scoop.it
From fault types to the Ring of Fire to hydraulic fracking, the Earthquakes infographic by Weather Underground helps us understand the complexities of what shakes the ground.

 

Tags: disasters, geomorphology, physical, infographic.


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 2:14 AM

Australian Curriculum

The causes, impacts and responses to a geomorphological hazard (ACHGK053)


GeoWorld 8

Chapter 4: Hazards: causes, impacts and responses

(4.5 - 4.6 Earthquakes)

Ness Crouch's curator insight, July 6, 2015 10:05 PM

Excellent infographic for showing Earthquakes :)

Jason Nemecek's curator insight, March 2, 2016 2:00 PM

Australian Curriculum

The causes, impacts and responses to a geomorphological hazard (ACHGK053)

 

GeoWorld 8

Chapter 4: Hazards: causes, impacts and responses

(4.5 - 4.6 Earthquakes)

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Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel | Teach it | Scoop.it

"The Sahel’s ability to produce food is not keeping pace with its growing population, and global warming will only exacerbate the imbalance, according to a new study.  Among the 22 countries making up the arid region in northern Africa, the population grew to 471 million in 2010 from 367 million in 2000, a jump of nearly 30%. As the population grew rapidly, the production of crops remained essentially unchanged.  Using satellite images to calculate annual crop production in the conflict-ridden Sahel belt, south of the Sahara desert, the researchers then compared output with population growth and food and fuel consumption."

 

Tags: Africa, Sahel, population, environment, water, ecology, environment depend, weather and climate, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 5:59 PM

with the strife in this region it is hardly surprising that it is hard to maintain food supplies in the face of large scale immigration. in a region where it is hard to survive, immigration would be a massive threat, straining already thinly spread resources.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:22 AM

If a country has a big population growth, the resources that it has if they are already scarce may become devastating. As the population of Sahel does increase, the amount of food resources will not have the proper time to react to the growth. Granted it may take a while for agricultural crops to grow and many citizens may face hard times facing finding food, but their hardships will be overcome by farmers trying to produce more crops to help ease that hardship.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:38 PM

this seems like an alarmingly common problem in the world today with population growth happening at an alarming rate in many parts of the world. most notably india and china. as well as in sahel, if your population grows by 100 million in 10 years it will be impossible to keep up and be able to provide for that many people in such a reletively short time.

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40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | Teach it | Scoop.it

I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.


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Heart-shaped landscapes

Heart-shaped landscapes | Teach it | Scoop.it

The top image is of a mangrove stand in New Caledonia, Glaslyn (Blue lake) is in Northern Wales and this cave is in the 4 corners region of the United States. 


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Dixie Conner's curator insight, February 14, 2014 12:11 PM

Happy Valentine's Day

Estelblau's comment, February 14, 2014 4:03 PM
Really great ;)!
Estelblau's comment, February 14, 2014 4:03 PM
Really great ;)!
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Interactive Hunger Map

Interactive Hunger Map | Teach it | Scoop.it
From Africa and Asia to Latin America and the Near East, there are 870 million people in the world who do not get enough food to lead a healthy, productive life.

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Jemma Tanner's curator insight, October 27, 2013 9:56 PM
I really liked this map because it's easy to read and is interactive. This would work really well on the SmartBoard because it's easily accessible for both the students and teacher. This resource could be adapted into a lesson where the students must choose either a red or burgundy country and complete a research project on why these countries have such high levels of hunger. You could also do group presentations on their findings so the whole class gets an overall view of developing countries. The great thing about this map is that it's very basic and can be used in younger grade levels without adjustment.
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Drying of the Aral Sea

Explore a global timelapse of our planet, constructed from Landsat satellite imagery. With water diverted to irrigation, the inland Aral Sea has shrunk drama...

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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, October 7, 2014 11:27 AM

The Aral Sea’s receding waters could prove fatal to the surrounding agriculture. Both Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan diverted the rivers that flowed into the Sea in the 1960s to feed their growing cotton and rice farms. Over the last five decades, the lack of a water source flowing into the Aral Sea combined with harsher droughts due to climate change have caused the water to evaporate at an alarming rate. As the water evaporates, large deposits of minerals remain on the bare lake bed. Winds pick up the mineral deposits and often spread them onto farms, where the increased salinity destroys rice paddies and other crops. The destruction of crops causes less food production, so less money is made by the farmers and more money has to be spent to bring in food to avoid famine. Cotton crops are also destroyed, so the region loses yet another source of income.

The increased evaporation of the Aral Sea has also caused an incredible increase to salinity levels in the lake itself. The extremely salty water cannot be used without heavy removing the salt, which is incredibly unaffordable in an already stressed region. Small subsidence farmers and local farmers cannot use the resource at hand. The fishing industry has completely collapsed, thus removing another important resource from the area.

If a wounded economy and unreliable food was not enough, the air born minerals blown away from the lake are causing numerous health problems. Respiratory issues, such as asthma, are becoming more and more common in the communities surrounding the Aral Sea due to the minerals and industrial debris in the air. The disappearance of the Sea has created the perfect conditions for the collapse of a region. The struggle that the people have to endure often escalates into increased social and political unrest, and disputes often occur. The Aral Sea exemplifies how one small environmental change can set off a chain of devastating events that lead to irreversible effects.

               

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 19, 2014 8:19 PM

The drying of the Aral Sea opens our eyes to how fragile our environment is and the scarcity of resources.  We need to become more aware of our resources, because as they saying goes, the "well will run dry."

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 1:14 PM

The massive changes to the Aral Sea can clearly be seen through the course of a decade. It's so unbelievable that from 2000 on ward it shrunk significantly and the video also showed the development of agricultural land that surrounds the rivers feeding into the Sea. The more water being irrigated and are not putting into the Sea the more it dries up because the water is evaporated with little to no rain going back to it. This is definitely one of the worst man-made disaster that have happened to this region.

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Why So Many Emerging Megacities Remain So Poor

Why So Many Emerging Megacities Remain So Poor | Teach it | Scoop.it
How globalization has changed the nature of urban development.

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Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 3:34 AM

useful for Year 9, 10 and 11 Geography units

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Can these satellite images save lives? The U.N. thinks so

Can these satellite images save lives? The U.N. thinks so | Teach it | Scoop.it
Stunning images taken from space put the world's crises into context.

 

U.N. satellite imagery has tracked the evolution of the camp since its creation. The exponential growth is remarkable.  The refugee camp is rapidly taking the shape of a real city — structured, planned and even separated into neighborhoods and subject to gentrification.

 

Tags: refugees, migration, conflict, political, war, squatter, urban, unit 7 cities, remote sensing, geospatial. 

 


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tom cockburn's curator insight, February 27, 2015 5:13 AM

Raises a number of serious questions.Not only about the middle East but about habitation,cultural development and resource distribution and deployment inequalities

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 15, 2015 8:00 PM

I definitely think that it would. It is impressive to see how a urban planning affected the land designed by the refuges. Within a few years through satellite imaging, we can witness and appreciate how  the Zaatarie refugee campus went from a few refugees to a total urbanized area receiving and distributed more than 85,000 refuges in the area. Urban planning plays a big role in regards to how display all populations. However, we have to take in consideration that when a massive population in one area is displayed, urban area is also relevant in terms of disciplines, public healthy, collaboration to live under a community rules. On other hand, natural disasters and destruction by war can wipe out entire cities within seconds. The satellite images were able to show the destruction that took place in the Syrian city of Hamas after natural diasters devastated the region and the wartorn afternmath of Gaza city. Natural disasters and war trigger a massive migration of refugees in search for better a life and opportunity.

Max Minard's curator insight, March 21, 2015 9:26 PM

This report refers to the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan which is experiencing rapid growth in population with 85,000 citizens and is even starting to look as a "city built form scratch". The reason geographers think that satellite imagery can save refugee lives is because it allows them to view areas of the camp in which they are unable to reach on ground. This information will help health workers pinpoint these certain hidden areas and tend to the people who are there. This use of satellite imagery centers around the camps rapid growth in population, making it quite a challenge to scale on ground. 

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Simple Graph

Simple Graph | Teach it | Scoop.it

Online graphs made easy.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, October 10, 2014 5:48 AM

Pretty much what it says on the box.

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5 Great Online Tools for Creating Infographics

5 Great Online Tools for Creating Infographics | Teach it | Scoop.it

Professional infographic designers rely primarily on a core vector graphics software program to create their infographics designs. The main advantage is that all the icons, charts, images, illustrations, and data visualizations are treated as separate objects that can be easily moved, resized, overlapped, and rotated. 


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Melissa Marshall's curator insight, October 15, 2014 12:56 AM

These tools are mostly web-based and provide ways in which students can visually represent their ideas. 

Stephan Hughes's curator insight, October 21, 2014 9:27 AM

Getting students to create infographics and using them ourselves to present information are more than justifiable reasons for these kind of tools

Isabelle Heymans's curator insight, November 8, 2014 4:43 AM

ajouter votre point de vue ...

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Disrupt Your Grading Rut: Alternative Assessment Methods for the Online Classroom

Disrupt Your Grading Rut: Alternative Assessment Methods for the Online Classroom | Teach it | Scoop.it
Authentic, learner-centered, collaborative assessment alternatives
Alternative assessment methods such as writing assignments, collaborative assignments, case studies, and debates can avoid the problems often associated with tests and quizzes. “There are many ways to approach assessment. It depends on the context of the course. When we teach faculty how to teach online, we try to give them a taste of a majority of those methods. I don’t know that we can cover all of them in one course, but there are multiple ways to get at the issues and make this a real-life situation for the students so they can actually learn from the process,” Pratt says.
Palloff and Pratt recommend selecting assessment methods that are learner-centered and authentic.

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Jose Pietri's curator insight, October 17, 2014 3:43 AM

"... but there are multiple ways to get at the issues and make this a real-life situation for the students so they can actually learn from the process" 

Steve Vaitl's curator insight, October 17, 2014 12:58 PM

For my Teaching friends. Great information about assessments focusing on more than simple memorizing information. With today's "age of information", open book testing can be used, when designed appropriately, to actually teach as well as assess.

Sue Walsh's curator insight, October 17, 2014 7:13 PM

it is a real challege to stretch thinking to real-life assessment approaches and take everyone on the journey. the focus on learner centred and authentic is great, and dare I mention the many of these approaches lend to assessment only pathways ... but thats a whole other challenge!

 

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Population Density

"This talks about what population density is and why people live where they do."

 

Tags: population, density. 


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Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, October 21, 2014 10:46 AM

Excellent short video defining and explaining population density. 

Catherine Pearce's curator insight, October 23, 2014 6:35 PM

A nice straight forward presentation

Bradley Hunkins's curator insight, October 28, 2014 2:55 PM

Why do people live in the locations they do and how can we impact our enviroment

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Great Tools and Apps for Teacher-Parent Communication ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Great Tools and Apps for Teacher-Parent Communication ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Teach it | Scoop.it
Students with parents who are up-to-date on their child(ren)'s lives tend to perform better in school. Fortunately, technology offers a variety of ways that can save teachers time as well as keep parents engaged. Here are some notable tools used by teachers and parents.

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BI Media Specialists's curator insight, October 27, 2014 10:01 AM

Have you tried any of these apps? I have used Storybird and really like it for creative writing activities.

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Using AirDrop in the Classroom - Instructional Tech Talk

Using AirDrop in the Classroom - Instructional Tech Talk | Teach it | Scoop.it
In the new version of OS X, Yosemite, AirDrop helps you quickly transfer files between your Mac and nearby Mac computers or iOS devices using Wi-Fi. The best part, especially in the school setting, is that your devices do not need to be on the same Wi-Fi network for AirDrop to work as they will create their own directly connected network to allow for file sharing.

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John O'Connor's curator insight, October 28, 2014 7:12 AM

AirDrop is a simple tool that is often faster than emailing pictures and is excellent for sharing video files.

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NASA unveils Earth Day 'global selfie' mosaic – News – ABC Environment (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

NASA unveils Earth Day 'global selfie' mosaic – News – ABC Environment (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Teach it | Scoop.it
NASA has compiled thousands of 'selfies' submitted via social media to create a mosaic image of the Earth.

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Google's Smarty Pins Game Tests Your Geography Knowledge

Google's Smarty Pins Game Tests Your Geography Knowledge | Teach it | Scoop.it
Google unveiled a fun new game called "Smarty Pins" that tests players' geography and trivia skills.

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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, July 5, 2014 9:05 AM

Google previously released other games, including Santa Maps Dive and Spell Up. For its part, Smarty Pins is similar to a game called GeoGuessr, which challenges players to identify a photo by clicking its location on Google Maps.

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50 Amazing Finds on Google Earth

50 Amazing Finds on Google Earth | Teach it | Scoop.it

"You’ve no doubt already come across some interesting finds on Google Earth. The post below attempts to compile the most fascinating sites other have stumbled upon browsing Google Earth. From natural formations to human structures, the world is a different place when viewed from above.  If you’re interested in seeing any of the places yourself, I’ve included the coordinates for every image shown below. Just copy and paste into Google Earth/Maps and explore for yourself!"


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Ann Marie Pelosky Poncet's curator insight, February 14, 2014 8:07 AM

IF you don't have time or money to travel, you can do so by following this link.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, February 14, 2014 10:26 PM

yes amazing geographic tool. I love zeroing in on Africa- so much more than sand and empty spaces.

ruth

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 2014 2:09 PM

When first reading this and viewing the images that go along with it; it became clear that someone somewhere in te world was either looking for these or they stumbled across these specfic faces and shapes in the earth that we dont neccesarily get to see everyday. 28. Monkey Face 65.476721, -173.511416 Russia. This Russian Monkey face was very interesting to see and I would have never thought that their would be these types of images captured.  

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Disaster Resilience Education For Schools: Australian Emergency Management Institute

Disaster Resilience Education For Schools: Australian Emergency Management Institute | Teach it | Scoop.it

For teachers and students, this toolkit of disaster resilience education resources focuses on both individual and community resilience, vital components to developing a shared understanding of the critical role everyone plays in developing a disaster resilient Australia. Resources are designed to be flexible to individual learning styles and are aligned to curriculum


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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, October 22, 2013 2:41 AM

Very timely resources in light of current NSW Bushfires...

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Geography Right Here. Right Now.

Amazing facts for a Geography of the 21st Century. See www.geography.org.uk See www.pupilvision.com


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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, November 3, 2013 9:26 PM
What is Geography? Why teach Geography?