Teach
0 view | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Nikki Scheu from Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

Hunger Map

Hunger Map | Teach | Scoop.it
From Africa and Asia to Latin America and the Near East, there are 870 million people in the world who do not get enough food to lead a healthy, productive life. The Hunger Map provides invaluable information that helps professionals, schools, and the general public understand more about the biggest single risk to global health.

Via Kristen McDaniel
more...
Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, February 28, 2014 11:48 AM

Interactive world map of hunger from the World Food Programme (UN).  Students can click on individual countries to see the category of hunger based on percent of population that is undernourished and factors such as farming ability and climate.  

Rescooped by Nikki Scheu from Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

Best Sites for Primary Documents in World History

Best Sites for Primary Documents in World History | Teach | Scoop.it
Here's links and descriptions of a dozen great websites for finding historic documents in World history. Samples from each site are included.

Via David McMullen, Kristen McDaniel
more...
Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, February 14, 2014 4:46 PM

Lots of sites for those often difficult-to-locate primary sources for world history.  

Utah Geographical Alliance's comment, April 19, 2014 4:02 AM
Great resource!
Rescooped by Nikki Scheu from Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

Visualizing Emancipation(s): Mapping The End of Slavery in America

Visualizing Emancipation(s): Mapping The End of Slavery in America | Teach | Scoop.it

Computer and online technologies are enabling historians to find ways to create new kinds of documents and ask new kinds of questions about history. Every other week, our Assistant Editor, UT History PhD student, Henry Wiencek, will introduce our readers to the most interesting of these new history projects and websites.

How did slavery end in America? It’s a deceptively simple question—but it holds a very complicated answer. “Visualizing Emancipation” is a new digital project from the University of Richmond that maps the messy, regionally dispersed and violent process of ending slavery in America.

 


Via Seth Dixon, Kristen McDaniel
more...
Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, February 7, 2014 10:18 AM

These overlay maps look at the emancipation of slaves in the southern US during the Civil War.  What a great way to get kids analyzing and questioning with the use of maps!