Talk To Me
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Talk To Me
My selection and perspective of the hundreds of works showing in the exhibition at MoMA, "Talk to Me".
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MoMA | Talk to Me | SMSlingshot

MoMA | Talk to Me | SMSlingshot | Talk To Me | Scoop.it
Ok, I am tired of saying about the possibilities that a software of a work in this exhibition can have. All the systems using new technologies which interfere in the cities, for me, are very interesting. Is a new way to relate to our own environment, and to the environment interact with us. So, the SMSlingshot is another example of how citizens could interfere in the landscape of their own city, communicating at the same time with thousands, maybe millions of people.

"The SMSlingshot marries the traditional weapon with digital technology, splattering information onto facades and other surfaces that then serve as public screens. The battery-powered device is a wooden slingshot with a display screen, keypad, and laser. Users can store and type text messages and then release the slingshot to blast them onto surfaces, where they appear within a splash of color and linger as long as the performers decide, and the text is tweeted at the same time. VR/Urban considers the SMSlingshot an intervention against increasingly commercialized urban space, which is thus reclaimed and occupied through virtual tags. The device fuses a prehistoric tool, vibrant urban art, and innovative technology into a product that encourages interaction, information, and empowerment in the city."
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MoMA | Talk to Me | Double-Taker (Snout)

MoMA | Talk to Me | Double-Taker (Snout) | Talk To Me | Scoop.it
I've already seen this work, but I don't remember where. The thing reminds me HAL-9000, don't you? The idea of a machine following my steps and facing my movements creeps me out. But can you imagine what kind of inventions could be done with this principle? It is the beginning of Robocop!

"With a body similar to a large worm or elephant trunk, Double-Taker (Snout) is surprisingly emotional for a creature consisting of a robotic arm and a single, giant googly eye. Snout was placed above the entrance to the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts in 2008, where it silently tracked the actions of museum visitors as they came in and out. A computer program used information from a stereo camera and vision algorithms to detect the visitors’ behavior and then directed these signals to influence the movements of the arm. The result was a mechanical cyclops that seemed bashful yet curious and interested as it caught glimpses of passersby and followed them with its eye. By endowing the robotic creature with realistic observational behaviors, the designers achieved a suggestion of intelligent awareness."
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MoMA | Talk to Me | Cross-fire from the Natural Occurrence series

MoMA | Talk to Me | Cross-fire from the Natural Occurrence series | Talk To Me | Scoop.it
This work, for me, could be classified as what I call PopMediaArt. It is a new media work using pop-art attributes and converging with sculptures of the experiment. Could be this classified as sound art? Or is just an experiment of how sound waves are absorbed by objects? Or is questioning the china that we put in our tables?

"Cross-fire, directed by Geoffrey Mann and produced by Chris Labrooy, takes an audio excerpt from Sam Mendes’s 1999 film American Beauty—a heated argument between Lester and Carolyn Burnham (Kevin Spacey and Annette Bening)—and animates it, so that the tension that tears across the room appears to be felt literally by the objects on the dining room table. There are no human bodies in the animation, only the voices of the characters and the music of Bobby Darin in the background; the fight’s relentless sound waves are absorbed and transferred across the table through the silverware, glasses, and dishes. With this film Mann explores the effect of the sound of speech on familiar objects—in this case with forms increasingly warping as the fight escalates. Cross-fire was commissioned by Past, Present & Future Craft Practice (PPFCP), a research project based at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, University of Dundee, Scotland."
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MoMA | Talk to Me | Suwappu

MoMA | Talk to Me | Suwappu | Talk To Me | Scoop.it
There is a very good quote from Lucia Santaella, a very popular semiotic intellectual, which says: "when a new way of producing language and communication appears, it happens a very interesting transition: at first, the new way makes an impact in the old methods and media. At a second moment, the media and the languages that can born inside of it are taken by the artists as an experimental object". That is the motive that I liked this work. It is not very innovative even a unique piece, but it is how our kids will start to play. The main powerful aspect here is the design very well worked and interactive. The face of the doll determines the character, and the pants the environment in which it will be. It is fantastic!

"Suwappu (Japanese for “swap”) is a series of eight toy characters—including Deer, Badger, Fox, Robin, and Tuna—whose lower and upper halves can be swapped and re-assembled into hybrid characters. The features painted on the characters act as visual markers that are deciphered with image-recognition software in an accompanying Suwappu app. Viewing the figures through the app unveils an augmented-reality world in which Suwappus interact and perform, based on personality cues triggered by the head, in surroundings determined by the markers on the legs. The designers at Dentsu London and BERG are “interested in Suwappu as characters, as merchandise, and as a new kind of content platform,” one that could have an extended life on Twitter, Facebook, and other social media platforms."
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MoMA | Talk to Me | Hungry Hungry Eat Head

MoMA | Talk to Me | Hungry Hungry Eat Head | Talk To Me | Scoop.it
My interest in this work is just the use of augmented reality in the city. The public, in this example, should carry a poster with a code to be the performance. But if the manufacturing companies start to do cloths with these codes? Everyone would be in a performance 24/7?

"Hungry Hungry Eat Head is an installation meant to engender interactive play in a public place. Participants are given large cardboard QR codes, which are transformed by video-tracking technology into three-dimensional animations broadcast live on a large LED screen, so that ordinary people turn into strange animals, grinning monsters, and alien creatures, all moving and interacting in real time. In the spirited free play that has resulted, some participants have adopted zany attitudes to suit their new personas, some have danced, some have just stared, and passersby have become witnesses to the spectacle. The installation introduces an element of fantasy and surprise into urban space using minimal technology, and anyone present can take advantage of it. Hungry Hungry Eat Head, which premiered in Edinburgh, was created for BBC Big Screen, a collaborative program between the BBC and eighteen UK cities, as part of the Abandon Normal Devices (AND) Festival."
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MoMA | Talk to Me | Locals and Tourists, New York and London

MoMA | Talk to Me | Locals and Tourists, New York and London | Talk To Me | Scoop.it
A very thoughtful work using visualization of data. It reminds me the excellent pieces of Aaron Koblin (http://www.aaronkoblin.com/).

"Locals and Tourists uses geotagging data from the photo-sharing websites Flickr and Picasa to visualize the different areas frequented by locals and tourists in New York, London, and 124 other cities, including Taipei, Sydney, Berlin, and San Jose, California. After harvesting millions of data points in the form of photographs, Eric Fischer links them by photographer and date and then plots them on a city’s OpenStreetMap grid. A photographer with many shots of the same city and a long photo history can be assumed to be a local and is represented in blue, and someone whose photos are taken within a limited time period is assumed to be a tourist and represented in red; photographers whose status can’t be determined are represented in yellow."
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MoMA | Talk to Me | Hello World!

MoMA | Talk to Me | Hello World! | Talk To Me | Scoop.it
Nice!

"Hello World! is a large-scale Semacode mowed into a wheat field near Ilmenau, in Germany’s Thuringia region. The code is formed by dark (mature green wheat plants) and light (mowed plants mixed with soil) squares 18 across and 18 down, that when decoded read “Hello, world!” in keeping with the tradition of christening any new coding experiment by programming it to produce this cheerful declaration. The installation, now integrated into Google Earth’s database of images, marries a low-tech method with a decidedly high-tech effect, while also making reference to and updating the ancient language of runes and crop circles. The human need for expression continues at a global, even planetary, scale."
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MoMA | Talk to Me | Augmented (hyper) Reality: Augmented City 3D

MoMA | Talk to Me | Augmented (hyper) Reality: Augmented City 3D | Talk To Me | Scoop.it
Like we were saying, augmented reality. In the future, it will be everywhere, in every situation. So how would be to live in a world that even the table communicates and interacts with us? Just a playful and questioning work about the hotter trend of the future.

"Keiichi Matsuda considers the architecture of today’s city to be increasingly about “the synthetic spaces created by the digital information that we collect, consume, and organize,” rather than the built form. In his film, Matsuda gives life to this idea, presenting the city as an “immersive human-computer interface” where the experience of moving and interacting with the three-dimensional environment is enhanced by an integrated layer of augmented reality."
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MoMA | Talk to Me | Hand from Above

MoMA | Talk to Me | Hand from Above | Talk To Me | Scoop.it
Another example of how the new technologies can interfere in our relationship to the city. The idea of being caught by a giant hand in my way to work wasn't in my plans. This software or mechanism can be used or thought to other experiments which question our way to handle the city.

"In Hand from Above, passersby are briefly transported to a different reality. The crowds walking near the large-screen LED monitor are broadcast live on the screen, but instead of the expected reflection, they see images of themselves being tickled, assaulted, or flicked away by an enormous hand, as though by some colossal deity. The reactions of the installation’s unwitting participants have varied: some run away, others flinch, but many interact with the hand, waving at the screen to attract attention. In every case, people are encouraged to pause in their normal routines and engage with a virtual presence and with each other. Hand from Above was commissioned by the Foundation for Art and Creative Technology and the Liverpool City Council for BBC Big Screen; it premiered during the Abandon Normal Devices (AND) Festival in Liverpool."
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MoMA | Talk to Me | Dead Drops

MoMA | Talk to Me | Dead Drops | Talk To Me | Scoop.it
I loved this work because is a very cool and imaginative way to do urban interventions using new technologies. Of course you will not have your computer everywhere you go, or any device with a usb hub. Still brings the question of how we are connected with the city and how the city relates to us.

"With Dead Drops, Bartholl created an anonymous, public peer-to-peer file-sharing space by “injecting” USB flash drives into walls, poles, or buildings at five NYC locations. Passersby can upload or share whatever they desire by plugging their devices directly into these ports. As such, Dead Drops embeds a unique space for uncensored public conversation into the physical structure of the city."
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