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Gifted children

http://www.euronews.com/ Being gifted has long been equated to being intelligent and having a high IQ. However, many scholars believe that students can also ...
Vrinda Shingdia's insight:

It is interesting seeing the view of gifted children in other parts of the world. This video focuses on Brazilian and Russian gifted children. In Russia, a school for gifted children starts the day off by cleaning to instill discipline. The term “cleanliness is next to Godliness” comes to mind. Sometimes cleaning is looked down upon as a janitorial and menial service. Thus, public spaces are often left very dirty. If everyone did their part and cleaned up after themselves, it would make a big difference. I think this action can have an overall global impact. This mindset of being clean, leaving spaces clean, and having respect for those who will conduct the final tidying, can have a ripple effect of using less and leaving less trash around. What better place to start this training than at school, as demonstrated at a gifted school in Russia! Education does not only relate to academics; children need to be “educated” in all facets of life, even gifted children who are already academically ahead. In relation to my personal upbringing, cleaning is an act of respect for myself and others, and self discipline. 

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What all teachers in regular classrooms can do for the gifted … # 1

What all teachers in regular classrooms can do for the gifted … # 1 | TAG Students | Scoop.it
Teachers often think they just haven't got time to differentiate the curriculum for gifted students.

Via Susan Liner Fisher
Vrinda Shingdia's insight:

One of the hardest aspects of being a teacher is identifying that every student learns differently. It is even harder to take this concept to the next level when you insert the concept of a "gifted and talented" student living amidst the "normal" students in a classroom. As in most most cases however, once you accept a situation and understand the process, you can adjust to anything. 

 

The adjusment process begins with understanding how to relate to know another. It is one of the hardest endeavors in this world to relate to another person, being that everyone is so unique. Luckily, the methods of trying are open to our imagination and are therefore unlimited. The points presented in this article confirm what I hold to be true. I enjoyed the approaches listed about trying to relate to the gifted and talented students in a classroom. The first and important point is to accept it. Sometimes that is the biggest part of any battle - accepting. Once you accept, then the rest of the points will come naturally. 

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My view: Ten myths about gifted students and programs for gifted - CNN (blog)

My view: Ten myths about gifted students and programs for gifted - CNN (blog) | TAG Students | Scoop.it

My view: Ten myths about gifted students and programs for giftedCNN (blog)Beyond that definition, there are no specific national criteria for identifying gifted and talented students nor does federal law provide funding or mandates for...


Via Susan Liner Fisher
Vrinda Shingdia's insight:

I appreciate the effort to examine myths regarding “gifted” students. There is undeniably a barrage of varying opinions about how to meet the needs of these special children. Without a foundational definition of what “gifted” truly means however, the term will continue to be ferociously attacked or fought in favor of.


As the article denotes, one size fits all does not work within education. Therefore, programs catered to the “gifted” student, or those catered to the struggling student exist. Both are intended to aid the child by providing either challenging coursework, or additional assistance. Unfortunately, there are a plethora of flaws within these programs – which result in the myths mentioned. Many times it can be argued that students within gifted programs are overachievers than they are gifted. Do they really belong in the program? Speaking from personal experience, I believe that I was placed into GT programs not necessarily because I was "gifted" but because I had parental support pushing me to overachieve. In retrospect, I am not clearly able to differentiate which part of my education was due to my alleged giftedness and which part was due to my overachieving tendencies. On the reverse, some “gifted” students are put into special classrooms because they have ranked highly on a test, but once within the program show no developmental progress socially or behaviorally. Do they belong in the program? This is the case with one particular student in the classroom in which I am interning. Statiscally, he scored high enough to be placed in the gifted program, but spends most of his days in the principals office due to behavioral issues. This goes back to the only constant: there is no concrete definition of what defines a gifted student or how a gifted program should be structured.


Being that the term “gifted” will most likely never be defined, the best approach appears to be to define the “gifted” program. Whatever district you live in, ensure that the program is challenging for the children, in every facet of the word. Students should be encouraged and engaged, and checked for academic, behavioral, and social progress, characteristics that will aid in a person’s overall growth. To define the program as one that is intended to enhance the development of a high performing student, is different than titling a child as gifted or nongifted. Children need to be stimulated when learning, and if that is the reason for the existence of the term “gifted” and the need for gifted programs, then I hope for its continuance, progress, and success.

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Alissa Huk's curator insight, March 18, 2013 1:31 AM

This is a great read and identifies the top 10 myths about gifted education and gifted students. A real eye-opener.

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Twitter / gtchatmod: Gifted programs need to speak ...

Vrinda Shingdia's insight:

I am a strong believer of not forcing “material,” “protocol,” and a “curriculum” onto a student. Although I agree that having a format of streamlining information so that we can function as a civilization is important, far too often I see rigid agendas being forced upon the young generation of the world. The stress of getting good grades outweighs creativity. Wanting to get that “good job” to survive and provide, takes precedence over simply enjoying learning. While I’m going to school right now I feel more pressure to perform higher and get better grades rather than enjoy my college years. The workload is a huge part of this.

 

Gifted children are not enhanced machinery onto which teachers can dump a heavier workload, and expect higher results and efficiency. They too need to develop their interests and passions. It is the teacher's responsbility to not overload the students with extra work which take away from opportunity to explore their passions and creativity.

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Rethinking Giftedness and Gifted Education: A Proposed Direction Forward Based on Psychological Science - Association for Psychological Science

Rethinking Giftedness and Gifted Education: A Proposed Direction Forward Based on Psychological Science - Association for Psychological Science | TAG Students | Scoop.it

Via Susan Liner Fisher
Vrinda Shingdia's insight:

The psychological scientific perspective presented in this video defines giftedness as nurture-based vs. nature-based. Upon understanding that children are not born “gifted” and it is not a “static phenomenon,” but that children are nurtured throughout their education to want to strive for excellence, one can then make an educated proposition regarding how to support these high performing students.

 

Talented children do indeed need opportunities exposed to them that will help them advance in their fields of interest. How to help these students maximize their potential and build strength in self-efficacy clearly needs more research. I question whether this research should be conducted by the Association of Psychological Science or internally amongst experienced educators in the field.


As talked about in the video, I don’t necessarily agree that acceleration is the all-inclusive appropriate approach to encourage children who are academically gifted, but I do believe that for some, early entrance into high school classes or admittance into college earlier than expected, will benefit them, as long as they are cognitively skillful and up to par with their older peers. I agree fully however, that the education system should allow all students to identify their preferences early in their educational journey. This will enable students to perform dedicated learning to their area of interest, while at the same time completing their other subjects. Dedicated coaching and specialized teaching is very important for all students, especially the “gifted,” by guaranteeing that students get the assistance they need to developmentally succeed in order to go on and become the future solvers of societal problems in the world.

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Gifted Students Have 'Special Needs,' Too - The Atlantic

Gifted Students Have 'Special Needs,' Too - The Atlantic | TAG Students | Scoop.it
Gifted Students Have 'Special Needs,' Too
The Atlantic
For many years, Washington's only sign of interest in this portion of the K-12 universe was the Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Program.

Via Susan Liner Fisher
Vrinda Shingdia's insight:

My first reaction and question to this article is: what defines an “elitist” student? If the answer is IQ testing, which is based on a presumptuous and invalidated system of measuring ones intelligence, or standardized tests which contain cultural biases, then I disagree wholeheartedly. I will however, argue in favor of the fact that each child has a special ability which makes him/her unique. For some children they may excel in academics, but may need support in other developmental areas. It is therefore fair to claim that these students have “needs” too.

 

So now the solution: Perhaps my optimistic view is based on lack of on-going teaching experience. But as a future educator, I see a simplistic solution being to ammend the curriculum as a whole. This would entail altering it such a way to include additional and challenging activities related to the same content areas, but that aid in other developmental areas including social, moral and emotional skills. Is tweaking the system set in place, in a way to stimulate creativity, rather than remain focused solely on academics of these overachievers, not enough? Enriching the content in lieu of labeling these students appears to be a viable option.

 

From where I’m standing, this change must start from the top, i.e. - the administrators who hover over the education system. Doing what it takes to demonstrate the benefits of enhancing the curriculum with practical strategy application activities through mediums apart from the standard paper and pencil, would be beneficial to these “gifted” students, and will ensure that they reach their full potential. 

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B Ritt Smetzer's curator insight, February 14, 2016 3:35 PM

The Atlantic published this article on their online newspaper which was written by Chester E. Finn. The idea behind it is that our government, school systems, and society hinders the support of our brightest children by denying funding for programs, funding for supplies and the belief that it is necessary. I whole-heartedly agree that children who are gifted also have "special needs" and deserved to be differentiated for.  We are denying them help and allocated as much money as we can to children with disabilities and who struggle with school. this article is very powerful and outlines where the misconception starts and how we are not taking action to make any of it any better.  I personally believe that this article should be read by every person who is in the education field and every parent of a gifted child.

 

Finn, C. E., Jr. (2012, December 22). Retrieved February 14, 2016, from http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2012/12/gifted-students-have-special-needs-too/266544/ ;