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Rescooped by Tarek Khamis from Geology
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Trickling of melted iron led to formation of Earth core - Pentagon Post

Trickling of melted iron led to formation of Earth core - Pentagon Post | T | Scoop.it
Pentagon Post
Trickling of melted iron led to formation of Earth core
Pentagon Post
Putting light on the research, study investigator Wendy Mao, said, “We know that Earth today has a core and a mantle that are differentiated.

Via Dr. Catherine Russell
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Rescooped by Tarek Khamis from Space & Time
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Mars Crater May Actually Be Ancient Supervolcano

Mars Crater May Actually Be Ancient Supervolcano | T | Scoop.it

A research project led by Joseph R. Michalski, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute, has identified what could be a supervolcano on Mars – the first discovery of its kind.


Via Michele Diodati
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Rescooped by Tarek Khamis from Geology
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Indonesia's Mount Sinabung Volcano Erupts, Villages Covered In Thick Ash - Huffington Post

Indonesia's Mount Sinabung Volcano Erupts, Villages Covered In Thick Ash - Huffington Post | T | Scoop.it
Straits Times Indonesia's Mount Sinabung Volcano Erupts, Villages Covered In Thick Ash Huffington Post MEDAN, Indonesia -- MEDAN, Indonesia (AP) — A volcano in western Indonesia erupted on Thursday, unleashing a column of dark volcanic material...

Via Dr. Catherine Russell
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Rescooped by Tarek Khamis from Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science
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Why the Avocado Should Have Gone the Way of the Dodo

Why the Avocado Should Have Gone the Way of the Dodo | T | Scoop.it
Its large pit and fleshy deliciousness are all a result of its status as an evolutionary anachronism

Via Meristemi
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Rescooped by Tarek Khamis from Erba Volant - Applied Plant Science
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Can an Algae-Powered Lamp Quench Our Thirst For Energy?

Can an Algae-Powered Lamp Quench Our Thirst For Energy? | T | Scoop.it
A French chemist is developing street lights that can absorb carbon dioxide 200 times more efficiently than trees

Via Meristemi
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Rescooped by Tarek Khamis from .. And Beyond!
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Germany Wants Its Own Internet Because of the NSA Debacle

Germany Wants Its Own Internet Because of the NSA Debacle | T | Scoop.it
As relations between the US and Europe become increasingly strained because, uh, the NSA spied on 35 world leaders, the state-backed Deutsche Telekom has declared that it wants to create a national internet to protect Germany from future privacy...

Via Andre Bontems
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Rescooped by Tarek Khamis from Jeff Morris
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Scientists develop implant that could stop Parkinson's growth

Scientists develop implant that could stop Parkinson's growth | T | Scoop.it
Scientists have developed a brain implant that could prevent the progression of Parkinson's disease. 

Via Jeff Morris
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Rescooped by Tarek Khamis from Space & Time
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Juno spacecraft resumes full flight operations on its way to Jupiter

Juno spacecraft resumes full flight operations on its way to Jupiter | T | Scoop.it

NASA’s Juno spacecraft, which is on its way to Jupiter, resumed full flight operations earlier today. The spacecraft had entered safe mode during its flyby of Earth last Wednesday. The safe mode did not impact the spacecraft's trajectory one smidgeon. This flyby provided the necessary gravity boost to accurately slingshot the probe towards Jupiter, where it will arrive on July 4, 2016.


Via Michele Diodati
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Rescooped by Tarek Khamis from Human Interest
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The World's Only Galloping Insect Runs Like A Race Horse In Slow-Mo

The World's Only Galloping Insect Runs Like A Race Horse In Slow-Mo | T | Scoop.it
One genus of South African dung beetle traded flying for a ridiculous-looking run. 

Via Jukka Melaranta
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Rescooped by Tarek Khamis from iScience Teacher
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Scientists Put Backpacks on Dragonflies to Track Their Brains in Flight | Wired Science | Wired.com

Scientists Put Backpacks on Dragonflies to Track Their Brains in Flight | Wired Science | Wired.com | T | Scoop.it
The brain of a dragonfly has to do some serious calculations -- and fast -- if it hopes to nab a mosquito or midge in midair.

Via Sherriden Masters, Sherriden Masters, John Purificati
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Sherriden Masters's curator insight, June 24, 2013 9:38 PM

Such an fascinating experiment, with significant challenges! The power harvesting using antenna, rather than having batteries, is brilliant. The labs they used, and the implications for studying neuron firing, are really interesting too! 

Also a little video on the site.

Rescooped by Tarek Khamis from Complex World
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The Year of Climate Departure for World Cities

The Year of Climate Departure for World Cities | T | Scoop.it

The global mean year of climate departure is 2047. The mean for the tropics is 2038, compared to 2053 for all other latitudes. Laboratory of Camilo Mora at University of Hawaii.


Via Claudia Mihai
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Rescooped by Tarek Khamis from Space & Time
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Milky Way galaxy ‘wobbles’

Milky Way galaxy ‘wobbles’ | T | Scoop.it

Astronomers have discovered that besides being permanently in motion, our Milky Way galaxy also makes small wobbling or squishing movements.


Via Michele Diodati
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Rescooped by Tarek Khamis from Space & Time
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The Effects of Space Weather on Aviation

The Effects of Space Weather on Aviation | T | Scoop.it

The next time you step onto an airplane, consider the following:  In any given year, the pilot of your aircraft probably absorbs as much radiation as a worker in a nuclear power plant. And you are about to follow him wherever he goes.


Via Michele Diodati
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Rescooped by Tarek Khamis from Amazing Science
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NASA rover confirms Mars origin of some meteorites that landed on Earth

NASA rover confirms Mars origin of some meteorites that landed on Earth | T | Scoop.it

Examination of the Martian atmosphere by NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover confirms that some meteorites that have dropped to Earth really are from the Red Planet.

 

A key new measurement of the inert gas argon in Mars’ atmosphere by Curiosity’s laboratory provides the most definitive evidence yet of the origin of Mars meteorites while at the same time providing a way to rule out Martian origin of other meteorites.

 

The new measurement is a high-precision count of two forms of argon — argon-36 and argon-38 — accomplished by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument inside the rover. These lighter and heavier forms, or isotopes, of argon exist naturally throughout the solar system. On Mars the ratio of light to heavy argon is skewed because much of that planet’s original atmosphere was lost to space. The lighter form of argon was taken away more readily because it rises to the top of the atmosphere more easily and requires less energy to escape. That left the Martian atmosphere relatively enriched in the heavier isotope, argon-38.

 

Years of past analyses by Earth-bound scientists of gas bubbles trapped inside Martian meteorites had already narrowed the Martian argon ratio to between 3.6 and 4.5 (that is 3.6 to 4.5 atoms of argon-36 to every one of argon-38). Measurements by NASA’s Viking landers in the 1970s put the Martian atmospheric ratio in the range of four to seven. The new SAM direct measurement on Mars now pins down the correct argon ratio at 4.2.

 

“We really nailed it,” said Sushil Atreya of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, lead author of an Oct. 16 paper reporting the finding in Geophysical Research Letters. “This direct reading from Mars settles the case with all Martian meteorites.”

 

One reason scientists have been so interested in the argon ratio in Martian meteorites is that it was — before Curiosity — the best measure of how much atmosphere Mars has lost since the planet’s wetter, warmer days billions of years ago. Figuring out the planet’s atmospheric loss would enable scientists to better understand how Mars transformed from a once water-rich planet, more like our own, into today’s drier, colder and less-hospitable world.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by Tarek Khamis from Astronomy physics and quantum physics
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How did supermassive black holes grow so big?

How did supermassive black holes grow so big? | T | Scoop.it
Galaxies may look pretty and delicate, with their swirls of stars of many colors -- but don't be fooled. At the heart of every galaxy, including our own Milky Way, lies a supermassive black hole.

Via Ioannis
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