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Rescooped by Amit Shrestha from Tracking the Future
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The Pentagon Basically Wants to Merge You With a Robot

The Pentagon Basically Wants to Merge You With a Robot | the future | Scoop.it

From artificial mammal brains to prosthetics that feel like real limbs, the military’s blue-sky researchers are aiming to bring man and machine closer than ever before.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Mlik Sahib's curator insight, March 7, 2014 1:27 PM

"DARPA doesn’t just want machines to get smarter; it wants them to work better, together. We’re talking about drones, which have already changed how the U.S. wages war. But the potential of drones is far from untapped and this year’s DARPA budget is brimming with research for new ways to leverage advances in robotics. The $5 million “Swarm Challenge” looks to see if a flock of small drones can all play well together. It involves the development of algorithms that would allow a number of small unmanned systems to work in unison and solve problems. Darpa envisions the drone hive-mind could be useful supporting troops in air, ground and maritime operations and could even help out in obstacle-clearing and search and rescue operations."

Rescooped by Amit Shrestha from Tracking the Future
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60,000 miles up: Space elevator could be built by 2035, new study says

60,000 miles up: Space elevator could be built by 2035, new study says | the future | Scoop.it

Imagine a ribbon roughly one hundred million times as long as it is wide. If it were a meter long, it would be 10 nanometers wide, or just a few times thicker than a DNA double helix. Scaled up to the length of a football field, it would still be less than a micrometer across — smaller than a red blood cell. Would you trust your life to that thread? What about a tether 100,000 kilometers long, one stretching from the surface of the Earth to well past geostationary orbit (GEO, 22,236 miles up), but which was still somehow narrower than your own wingspan?

The idea of climbing such a ribbon with just your body weight sounds precarious enough, but the ribbon predicted by a new report from the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) will be able to carry up to seven 20-ton payloads at once. It will serve as a tether stretching far beyond geostationary (aka geosynchronous) orbit and held taught by an anchor of roughly two million kilograms. Sending payloads up this backbone could fundamentally change the human relationship with space — every climber sent up the tether could match the space shuttle in capacity, allowing up to a “launch” every couple of days.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Szabolcs Kósa
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aanve's curator insight, March 7, 2014 9:38 PM
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Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, March 9, 2014 12:49 AM

Think I will pass on this

Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, March 10, 2014 10:41 PM

Hundreds of challenges remain to be solved but as even NASA struggles to maintain an edge, the pay-off of a Space Elevator has never been clearer. The original idea of Konstantin Tsiolkovsky which Arthur C. Clarke turned into a novel could be the revolution space exploration needs.

Rescooped by Amit Shrestha from Tracking the Future
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Between Ape and Artilect

Between Ape and Artilect | the future | Scoop.it

During 2010-12, noted AI researcher and long-time Humanity+ Board member Ben Goertzel conducted a series of textual interviews with researchers in various areas of cutting-edge science — artificial general intelligence, nanotechnology, life extension, neurotechnology, collective intelligence, mind uploading, body modification, neuro-spiritual transformation, and more. These interviews were published online in H+ Magazine, and are here gathered together in a single volume. The resulting series of dialogues treats a variety of social, futurological and scientific topics in a way that is accessible to the educated non-scientist, yet also deep and honest to the subtleties of the topics being discussed.

 

Between Ape and Artilect is a must-read if you want the real views, opinions, ideas, muses and arguments of the people creating our future.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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luiy's curator insight, March 8, 2014 2:34 PM

- Itamar Arel: AGI via Deep Learning 

- Pei Wang: What Do You Mean by “AI”? 
- Joscha Bach: Understanding the Mind
- Hugo DeGaris: Will There be Cyborgs?
- DeGaris Interviews Goertzel: Seeking the Sputnik of AGI 
- Linas Vepstas: AGI, Open Source and Our Economic Future 
- Joel Pitt: The Benefits of Open Source for AGI
- Randal Koene: Substrate-Independent Minds
- João Pedro de Magalhães: Ending Aging 
- Aubrey De Grey: Aging and AGI
- David Brin: Sousveillance
- J. Storrs Hall: Intelligent Nano Factories and Fogs
- Mohamad Tarifi: AGI and the Emerging Peer-to-Peer Economy 
- Michael Anissimov: The Risks of Artificial Superintelligence 
- Muehlhauser & Goertzel: Rationality, Risk, and the Future of AGI 
- Paul Werbos: Will Humanity Survive?
- Wendell Wallach: Machine Morality
- Francis Heylighen: The Emerging Global Brain 
- Steve Omohundro: The Wisdom of the Global Brain and the Future of AGI 
- Alexandra Elbakyan: Beyond the Borg 
- Giulio Prisco: Technological Transcendence 
- Zhou Changle: Zen and the Art of Intelligent Robotics 
- Hugo DeGaris: Is God an Alien Mathematician? 
- Lincoln Cannon: The Most Transhumanist Religion?
- Natasha Vita-More: Upgrading Humanity 
- Jeffery Martin & Mikey Siegel: Engineering Enlightenment 

aanve's curator insight, March 8, 2014 10:03 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Mlik Sahib's curator insight, March 8, 2014 10:40 PM

- Itamar Arel: AGI via Deep Learning 

- Pei Wang: What Do You Mean by “AI”? 
- Joscha Bach: Understanding the Mind
- Hugo DeGaris: Will There be Cyborgs?
- DeGaris Interviews Goertzel: Seeking the Sputnik of AGI 
- Linas Vepstas: AGI, Open Source and Our Economic Future 
- Joel Pitt: The Benefits of Open Source for AGI
- Randal Koene: Substrate-Independent Minds
- João Pedro de Magalhães: Ending Aging 
- Aubrey De Grey: Aging and AGI
- David Brin: Sousveillance
- J. Storrs Hall: Intelligent Nano Factories and Fogs
- Mohamad Tarifi: AGI and the Emerging Peer-to-Peer Economy 
- Michael Anissimov: The Risks of Artificial Superintelligence 
- Muehlhauser & Goertzel: Rationality, Risk, and the Future of AGI 
- Paul Werbos: Will Humanity Survive?
- Wendell Wallach: Machine Morality
- Francis Heylighen: The Emerging Global Brain 
- Steve Omohundro: The Wisdom of the Global Brain and the Future of AGI 
- Alexandra Elbakyan: Beyond the Borg 
- Giulio Prisco: Technological Transcendence 
- Zhou Changle: Zen and the Art of Intelligent Robotics 
- Hugo DeGaris: Is God an Alien Mathematician? 
- Lincoln Cannon: The Most Transhumanist Religion?
- Natasha Vita-More: Upgrading Humanity 
- Jeffery Martin & Mikey Siegel: Engineering Enlightenment 

Rescooped by Amit Shrestha from Tracking the Future
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The future of education

Videogames, digital pens, holograms and tactile learning platforms could all become the norm as education looks set to change dramatically over the next 30 years. With technology dominating in and outside the classroom, interconnectivity is likely to play a key role in helping students adapt to the changing world around them


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Rachael Bath's curator insight, March 15, 2014 9:05 AM

Nice thoughts and interesting predictions.

XLPro Training's comment, April 14, 2014 12:58 AM
Nice Predictions....
XLPro Training's comment, April 14, 2014 12:58 AM
Nice Predictions....
Rescooped by Amit Shrestha from COOL 3DPRINTING
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3D-printed liver replica to help in transplant operations - NDTV

3D-printed liver replica to help in transplant operations - NDTV | the future | Scoop.it
The 3D-printed liver replicas, made of transparent material threaded with coloured arteries and veins, could help surgeons prevent complications while performing liver transplants or removing tumours, a path-breaking research shows.

Till date, surgeons look at a magnetic resonance image (MRI) or a computed tomography (CT) scan to visualise the liver and plan the operation.

"We provide the surgeons with a physical model that is 100 percent identical to what they would encounter in surgery when they operate," Nizar Zein, chief of hepatology at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, was quoted as saying.

It takes away some of the potential surprises that would be found at the time of surgery.

To create the artificial liver, the researchers combined the MRI and CT scans that patients have already undergone and then recreated the 3D shape of the organ.

These models were anatomically accurate in terms of volume and location of vessels in the liver.

Using these models, the team created the 3D-printed organs using a transparent polymer, then dyed the main blood vessels and the bile ducts.

The researchers are now developing similar methods to guide complicated surgeries, such as hand and face transplants, and pancreatic tumour removals.

The new liver replica could also be used to train medical students in the techniques needed for surgery, Zein added in a study published in the journal Liver Transplantation.

Relevantly, a US company in January claimed to have developed the world's first multi-material full-colour 3D printer capable of making objects of hard, soft and flexible polymers.

The 3D printer developed by Stratasys features "triple-jetting" technology that combines droplets of three base materials, reducing the need for separate print runs and painting.


Via Annie Theunissen
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Inge Bothma's curator insight, March 12, 2014 5:03 AM

WOW! So amazing

Rescooped by Amit Shrestha from Gadgets I lust for
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Finally a smartwatch that looks smart?

Finally a smartwatch that looks smart? | the future | Scoop.it

Gábor Balogh is a freelance designer from Hungary who, like many of us, wants an attractive, watch-like watch that just happens to be smart. The difference between Balogh and the rest of us is he went ahead and designed an interface he believes could enable regular watch designs to include a full bevy of smart features.


Via Guillaume Decugis
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Arthur Charles Smith's curator insight, March 11, 2014 6:39 PM

Wearable technology is not just a cool idea. It's no longer bulky and unappealing, it's sleak and it's fashionable.

Jack Barfoot's curator insight, March 18, 2014 10:15 AM

Looks a good Idea but what are the flaws

Anuj Taya Ror's curator insight, March 28, 2014 7:15 AM

This is one of the best article I found on internet. It explain that how can be a normal wrist-watch converted in a smart-watch. Which will have all the mobile computational power. This watch could have maps, internet, media and internet capabilities.

Rescooped by Amit Shrestha from Gadgets I lust for
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Will the iPhone 6 be solar powered?

Will the iPhone 6 be solar powered? | the future | Scoop.it

The iPhone 5S is less than six months old but buzzes about the iPhone 6 is becoming a hotter topic. Many people are wondering if it will be bigger or of the same size. Will it be joined by an iPhone 6C, or the iWatch and is it going to have standout features?


Via Guillaume Decugis
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Charline Missu's curator insight, March 10, 2014 5:33 PM

Un sujet bien d'actualité avec les progrès que l'on voit en matière de recharge mobile, il serait temps d'adapter ce que l'on sait à d'autres technologies :)

Inge Bothma's curator insight, March 12, 2014 4:57 AM

Might solve the screen cracking disaster!

Jamie Ruppert's curator insight, March 15, 2014 10:19 AM

What's next for iPhone? What could be more convenient than solar power?