Syncrebibliosis
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A Radical Way of Unleashing a Generation of Geniuses

A Radical Way of Unleashing a Generation of Geniuses | Syncrebibliosis | Scoop.it
Students in Matamoros, Mexico weren't getting much out of school -- until a radical new teaching method unlocked their potential. And then everything changed.
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The Developing Mind, Second Edition: How Relationships and the Brain Interact to Shape Who We Are: 9781462503902: Medicine & Health Science Books @ Amazon.com

The Developing Mind, Second Edition: How Relationships and the Brain Interact to Shape Who We Are

Product by Brand: The Guilford Press ~ Daniel J. Siegel (author) More about this product
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In this book, Daniel J. Siegel goes beyond the nature and nurture divisions that traditionally have constrained much of our thinking about development, exploring the role of interpersonal relationships in forging key connections in the brain. He presents a groundbreaking new way of thinking about the emergence of the human mind and the process by which each of us becomes a feeling, thinking, remembering individual. Illuminating how and why neurobiology matters, this book is essential reading for clinicians, educators, researchers, and students interested in promoting healthy development and resilience.

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What Does Buddhism Require?

The reality of rebirth may not be necessary. But believing in it probably is.
Jerry Swatez's insight:

Buddhism is a syncretic religion.

Self is a practical illusion.

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When science and philosophy collide in a 'fine-tuned' universe

In a 2004 review in "Science" of "Searle's Mind: a Brief Introduction," neuroscientist Christof Koch wrote:

"Whether we scientists are inspired, bored, or infuriated by philosophy, all our theorising and experimentation depends on particular philosophical background assumptions. This hidden influence is an acute embarrassment to many researchers, and it is therefore not often acknowledged. Such fundamental notions as reality, space, time and causality – notions found at the core of the scientific enterprise – all rely on particular metaphysical assumptions about the world."


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-04-science-philosophy-collide-fine-tuned-universe.html#jCp

Jerry Swatez's insight:

Lakoff & Johnson address this influence directly.

Lyotard addresses it tacitly.

Siegel addresses it indirectly.

 

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Amazon.com: The Order of Things: An Archaeology of the Human Sciences (9780679753353): Michel Foucault: Books

The Order of Things: An Archaeology of the Human Sciences

~ Michel Foucault (author) More about this product
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Amazon.com: The Order of Things: An Archaeology of the Human Sciences (9780679753353): Michel Foucault: Books
Jerry Swatez's insight:

Foucault's notion of "episteme" provides a way of noticing the deep structure of how the public mind --and individual minds making up such a public-- think at certain periods in our intellectual history.

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Philosophy in the Flesh: the Embodied Mind & its Challenge to Western Thought: George Lakoff, Mark Johnson: 9780465056743: Amazon.com: Books

Philosophy in the Flesh: the Embodied Mind & its Challenge to Western Thought

~ Mark Johnson (author) More about this product
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 What are human beings like? How is knowledge possible? What is truth? Where do moral values come from? Questions like these have stood at the center of Western philosophy for centuries. In addressing them, philosophers have made certain fundamental assumptions—that we can know our own minds by introspection, that most of our thinking about the world is literal, and that reason is disembodied and universal—that are now called into question by well-established results of cognitive science. It has been shown empirically that:Most thought is unconscious. We have no direct conscious access to the mechanisms of thought and language. Our ideas go by too quickly and at too deep a level for us to observe them in any simple way.Abstract concepts are mostly metaphorical. Much of the subject matter of philosopy, such as the nature of time, morality, causation, the mind, and the self, relies heavily on basic metaphors derived from bodily experience. What is literal in our reasoning about such concepts is minimal and conceptually impoverished. All the richness comes from metaphor. For instance, we have two mutually incompatible metaphors for time, both of which represent it as movement through space: in one it is a flow past us and in the other a spatial dimension we move along.Mind is embodied. Thought requires a body—not in the trivial sense that you need a physical brain to think with, but in the profound sense that the very structure of our thoughts comes from the nature of the body. Nearly all of our unconscious metaphors are based on common bodily experiences.Most of the central themes of the Western philosophical tradition are called into question by these findings. The Cartesian person, with a mind wholly separate from the body, does not exist. The Kantian person, capable of moral action according to the dictates of a universal reason, does not exist. The phenomenological person, capable of knowing his or her mind entirely through introspection alone, does not exist. The utilitarian person, the Chomskian person, the poststructuralist person, the computational person, and the person defined by analytic philosopy all do not exist.Then what does?Lakoff and Johnson show that a philosopy responsible to the science of mind offers radically new and detailed understandings of what a person is. After first describing the philosophical stance that must follow from taking cognitive science seriously, they re-examine the basic concepts of the mind, time, causation, morality, and the self: then they rethink a host of philosophical traditions, from the classical Greeks through Kantian morality through modern analytic philosopy. They reveal the metaphorical structure underlying each mode of thought and show how the metaphysics of each theory flows from its metaphors. Finally, they take on two major issues of twentieth-century philosopy: how we conceive rationality, and how we conceive language.Philosopy in the Flesh reveals a radically new understanding of what it means to be human and calls for a thorough rethinking of the Western philosophical tradition. This is philosophy as it has never been seen before.

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Differend: Phrases in Dispute (Theory and History of Literature) (9780816616114): Jean-Francois Lyotard: Books

Differend: Phrases in Dispute (Theory and History of Literature)

~ Jean-Francois Lyotard (author) More about this product
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Amazon.com: Differend: Phrases in Dispute (Theory and History of Literature) (9780816616114): Jean-Francois Lyotard: Books
Jerry Swatez's insight:

What I hear in Lyotard's words are echoes of references to professional controversies in various fields. Lyotard writes --and I [COMMENT]:

 

Thesis
        [COMMENT: I want to clarify that, as I read this preface, the    

         thesis is the nut, the core, the meat, the central point of the text.
              Thesis = A proposition that is maintained by argument. An
               original point of view. A hypothetical proposition.]
    
    Phrases are constituted according to sets of rules (phrase regimens).
        reasoning
        knowing
        describing
        recounting
        questioning
        showing
        ordering
        etc.
    Phrases from heterogeneous regimens cannot be translated one into another.
        [COMMENT: I read this assertion with a feeling of awe. If true, its
        implications are vast.

        One example:

        a. Translations from one language to another (e.g., French/English) can only be done in cases in which the two languages share phrase regimens.

         b. Implied: (Such) phrase regimens are not relative to cultures; they are, in principle, universal.]

    Phrases from heterogeneous regimens can, however be linked together.
    Phrase linkings must accord with an end specified by a genre of discourse,
        which genre the heterogeneous phrases in question share.
            Dialogue links a showing (e.g., an ostention)
                        or a description (e.g., a definition)
                      onto a question.
    The end (stake) specified by the dialogic genre of discourse is
        the two parties coming to an agreement about the sense of a referent.
    Some[additional]goals specified (fixed) by certain genres of discourse are:
        to know
        to teach
        to be just
        to seduce
        to justify
        to evaluate
        to rouse emotion
        to oversee
        . . .

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