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Synthetic gene circuits pump up cell signals

Synthetic gene circuits pump up cell signals | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —Synthetic genetic circuitry created by researchers at Rice University is helping them see, for the first time, how to regulate cell mechanisms that degrade the misfolded proteins implicated in Parkinson's, Huntington's and other diseases.
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Mathematicians and Biochemists Synthesize a Temperature-Invariant Biological Genetic Clock at UH and Rice

Mathematicians and Biochemists Synthesize a Temperature-Invariant Biological Genetic Clock at UH and Rice | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
Read about how Mathematicians and Biochemists Synthesize a Temperature-Invariant Biological Genetic Clock at UH and Rice
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Berkeley Lab proposal for an open biofoundry passes crucial first test - Nanowerk

Berkeley Lab proposal for an open biofoundry passes crucial first test - Nanowerk | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
Nanowerk Berkeley Lab proposal for an open biofoundry passes crucial first test Nanowerk This biomanufacturing center would aim to meet the biomanufacturing challenges through three main interrelated components: a one-of-a-kind open collaboration...
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Why Innovation in Academic Publishing Is Essential

Why Innovation in Academic Publishing Is Essential | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
Why Innovation in Academic Publishing Is Essential
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Self-assembled silver superlattices create molecular machines with hydrogen-bond 'hinges' and moving 'gears'

Self-assembled silver superlattices create molecular machines with hydrogen-bond 'hinges' and moving 'gears' | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
A combined computational and experimental study of self-assembled silver-based structures known as superlattices has revealed an unusual and unexpected behavior: arrays of gear-like molecular-scale machines that rotate in unison when pressure is applied to them.
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A Biological 2-Input Decoder Circuit in Human Cells

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Guinn M, Bleris L.

"Decoders are combinational circuits that convert information from n-inputs to a maximum of 2n outputs. This operation is of major importance in computing systems yet it is vastly underexplored in synthetic biology. Here, we present a synthetic gene network architecture that operates as a biological decoder in human cells, converting 2 inputs to 4 outputs. As a proof-of-principle, we use small molecules to emulate the two inputs and fluorescent reporters as the corresponding four outputs. The experiments are performed using transient transfections in human kidney embryonic cells and the characterization by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. We show a clear separation between the ON and OFF mean fluorescent intensity states. Additionally, we adopt the integrated mean fluorescence intensity for the characterization of the circuit and show that this metric is more robust to transfection conditions when compared to the mean fluorescent intensity. To conclude, we present the first implementation of a genetic decoder. This combinatorial system can be valuable towards engineering higher-order circuits as well as accommodate a multiplexed interface with endogenous cellular functions."


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Off the shelf, on the skin: Stick-on electronic patches for health monitoring (w/ video)

Off the shelf, on the skin: Stick-on electronic patches for health monitoring (w/ video) | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —Wearing a fitness tracker on your wrist or clipped to your belt is so 2013. Engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Northwestern University have demonstrated thin, soft stick-on patches that stretch and move with the skin and incorporate commercial, off-the-shelf ...
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'Life Redesigned: The Emergence of Synthetic Biology' Lecture on Wednesday, April 30

'Life Redesigned: The Emergence of Synthetic Biology' Lecture on Wednesday, April 30 | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
'Life Redesigned: The Emergence of Synthetic Biology' Lecture on Wednesday, April 30. Press release distribution provided by EIN News
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Developing a culture of security for synthetic biology

Developing a culture of security for synthetic biology http://t.co/jKdGHtPYEe
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Semi-synthetic artemisinin: a model for the use of synthetic biology in pharmaceutical development

Semi-synthetic artemisinin: a model for the use of synthetic biology in pharmaceutical development | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
Gerd Moe-Behrens's insight:

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Chris J. Paddon & Jay D. Keasling

"Recent developments in synthetic biology, combined with continued progress in systems biology and metabolic engineering, have enabled the engineering of microorganisms to produce heterologous molecules in a manner that was previously unfeasible. The successful synthesis and recent entry of semi-synthetic artemisinin into commercial production is the first demonstration of the potential of synthetic biology for the development and production of pharmaceutical agents. In this Review, we describe the metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches that were used to develop this important antimalarial drug precursor. This not only demonstrates the incredible potential of the available technologies but also illuminates how lessons learned from this work could be applied to the production of other pharmaceutical agents.?


 http://bit.ly/1pNVSiv

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A brief history of synthetic biology

A brief history of synthetic biology | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
Gerd Moe-Behrens's insight:

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D. Ewen Cameron, Caleb J. Bashor & James J. Collins

"The ability to rationally engineer microorganisms has been a long-envisioned goal dating back more than a half-century. With the genomics revolution and rise of systems biology in the 1990s came the development of a rigorous engineering discipline to create, control and programme cellular behaviour. The resulting field, known as synthetic biology, has undergone dramatic growth throughout the past decade and is poised to transform biotechnology and medicine. This Timeline article charts the technological and cultural lifetime of synthetic biology, with an emphasis on key breakthroughs and future challenges."

 http://bit.ly/1higfgP

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Biologik - Synthetic Biology will soon be regrowing organs... | Facebook

Synthetic Biology will soon be regrowing organs from our own cells.... http://t.co/vN6tweeSk7
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Science AMA Series: I’m Mark Hahnel, former stem cell biologist, founder of figshare. Academia is broken. Discuss. Also, AMA. : science

Science AMA Series: I’m Mark Hahnel, former stem cell biologist, founder of figshare. Academia is broken. Discuss. Also, AMA. : science | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
There are very few, if any discoveries each year in academia that come about without building on the concepts and ideas that have been previously publ...
Gerd Moe-Behrens's insight:

*Academica is broken*

by

 MarkHahnel

"There are very few, if any discoveries each year in academia that come about without building on the concepts and ideas that have been previously published in academic journals. This is the natural progression of research. However, this is often limited to building on top of conclusions or ideas, as opposed to conducting the actual research itself. Current dissemination of research is largely based on making .pdf-based summaries of key findings available, while the actual research outputs and raw data behind the graphs are largely unavailable. This isn’t due to a lack of demand to by researchers to get credit for all of their hard work, it’s because the publication and subsequent reward structure in academia does not support this.

Perhaps the most depressing part of academia is the waste of research outputs. So much funding and researcher time goes into doing experiments that produce null results. This isn’t a bad thing. The problem here is that no single academic can be right all of the time, so when experiments are carried out (often at great costs, both financially and in terms of time) that do not confirm the hypothesis, where does this research go? The simple answer is nowhere."


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Summarizing DNA nanotechnology, Synthetic Biology are on the path to realizing visions of nanomedicine and Nanoscale Metamaterial to visible spectrum control

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How these London scientists make body parts in a lab - The Times Herald

How these London scientists make body parts in a lab - The Times Herald | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
CTV News
How these London scientists make body parts in a lab
The Times Herald
How these London scientists make body parts in a lab.
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Synthetic biology platform of CoryneBrick vectors for gene expression in Corynebacterium glutamicum and its application to xylose utilization

Synthetic biology platform of CoryneBrick vectors for gene expression in Corynebacterium glutamicum and its application to xylose utilization | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
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A new world wide web: Using spider silk to mend bones

A new world wide web: Using spider silk to mend bones | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
Spinning silk into bandages, bones … and breast implants.
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Synthetic biology of metabolism: using natural variation to reverse engineer systems

Synthetic biology of metabolism: using natural variation to reverse engineer systems | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
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Synthetic biology approaches to engineering the nitrogen symbiosis in cereals

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Math modeling integral to synthetic biology research

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Kathy Major

"A long-standing challenge in synthetic biology has been to create gene circuits that behave in predictable and robust ways. Mathematical modeling experts from the University of Houston (UH) collaborated with experimental biologists at Rice University to create a synthetic genetic clock that keeps accurate time across a range of temperatures. The findings were published in a recent issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"Synthetic gene circuits are often fragile, and environmental changes frequently alter their behavior," said Krešimir Josić, professor of mathematics in UH's College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. "Our work focused on engineering a gene circuit not affected by temperature change."
Synthetic biology is a field in which naturally occurring biological systems are redesigned for various purposes, such as producing biofuel. The UH and Rice research targeted the bacterium E. coli.
"In E. coli and other bacteria, if you increase the temperature by about 10 degrees the rate of biochemical reactions will double – and therefore genetic clocks will speed up," Josić said. "We wanted to create a synthetic gene clock that compensates for this increase in tempo and keeps accurate time, regardless of temperature."
The UH team, led by Josić and William Ott, an assistant professor of mathematics, collaborated with the lab of Matthew Bennett, assistant professor of biochemistry and cell biology at Rice. Josić, Bennett and Ott have been working together on various research projects for three years. The team also included UH postdoctoral fellow Chinmaya Gupta.
According to Bennett, the ability to keep cellular reactions accurately timed, regardless of temperature, may be valuable to synthetic biologists who wish to reprogram cellular regulatory mechanisms for biotechnology.
The work involved engineering a gene within the clock onto a plasmid, a little piece of DNA that is inserted into E. coli. A mutation in the gene had the effect of slowing down the clock as temperature increased.
UH researchers created a mathematical model to assess the various design features that would be needed in the plasmid to counteract temperature change. Gupta showed that the model captured the mechanisms essential to compensate for the temperature-dependent changes in reaction rates.
The computational modeling confirmed that a single mutation could result in a genetic clock with a stable period across a large range of temperatures – an observation confirmed by experiments in the Bennett lab. Josić's team then confirmed the predictions of the models using real data.
"Having a mechanistic model that allows you to determine which features are important and which can be ignored for a genetic circuit to behave in a particular way allows you to more efficiently create circuits with desired properties," Gupta said. "It allows you to concentrate on the most important factors necessary in the design."
"Throughout this work, we used mathematical models to find out what is important in designing robust synthetic gene circuits," Josić said. "Computational and mathematical tools are essential in all types of engineering. Why not for biological engineering?"
Josić, Ott and Bennett's research is funded by the National Institutes of Health through the joint National Science Foundation/National Institute of General Medical Sciences Mathematical Biology Program."


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An Invitation to Contribute to the Second Life of the Synthetic Biology Collection - PLOS Biologue

An Invitation to Contribute to the Second Life of the Synthetic Biology Collection - PLOS Biologue | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
  Synthetic Biologist Dr. Jean Peccoud introduces a major rejuvenation of the PLOS Synthetic Biology Collection and calls on the community to lead the
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The battle for the “green” polymer. Different approaches for biopolymer synthesis: bioadvantaged vs. bioreplacement

The battle for the “green” polymer. Different approaches for biopolymer synthesis: bioadvantaged vs. bioreplacement | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
Biopolymers have been used throughout history; however, in the last two centuries they have seen a decrease in their utilization as the proliferation of inexpensive and mass-produced materials from petrochemical feedstocks quickly became better-suited to meeting society's needs. In recent years, high petroleum pric
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Synthetic biology: E. coli reporter gets the inside scoop

Synthetic biology: E. coli reporter gets the inside scoop | SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute | Scoop.it
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Christina Tobin Kåhrström

"Recent progress in synthetic biology has enabled the construction of sophisticated genetic circuits to monitor environmental stimuli. Kotula et al. now engineer Escherichia coli with a genetic memory device that is capable of sensing, remembering and reporting on antibiotic exposure in the mammalian gut."


 http://bit.ly/1jZLDsk

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[Douglas Densmore] Fluigi: Synthetic Biology Based Microfluidic ...

Fluigi: Synthetic Biology Based Microfluidic Control Synthesis. Douglas Densmore.
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Scott C Mohr's curator insight, April 3, 2014 2:56 PM

I hope to see this field advance as microfluidic systems evolve and enable rapid development of synthetic circuits.