Symbols and cultural identity
155 views | +0 today
Follow
Symbols and cultural identity
Looking at the different cultural symbols of Newtown (Sydney, Australia) and the symbols of the city of Sydney and Australia as a nation.
Curated by Eric Jewson
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Eric Jewson
Scoop.it!

Civic history - City of Sydney

Civic history - City of Sydney | Symbols and cultural identity | Scoop.it
A history of Sydney City Council, which dates back to the 1840s.
Eric Jewson's insight:

The city of Sydney has a vast history as Australia's oldest city. This site has lots of useful data on it to be able to form a timeline of the development of the city and its people.

 

Particularly useful for stage 2 and investigating cultural identity in community are the sections on the symbols of the city and people and places. Symbols of the city delves into the history of Sydney and how it developed its coat of arms, flag and flower.

 

One way you could use this site in a classroom would be to compare Sydney with other city histories to see how cities can evolve in different ways. Sydney was never truly designed to be a city but rather started small and kept adding more suburbs. This is seen today in the lack of grid structure in its streets, which more often follow the lay of the land and sometimes have been built over old indigenous tracks. Relations to Aboriginal people in the area have changed vastly over time, there is a relevant list of significant days in history here: http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/learn/history/aboriginal-history/significant-dates.

As a task for the classroom students in groups could investigate the meaning behind one aspect of the symbols of Sydney (coat of arms, flower, gemstone, flag) and explain to the rest of the class the importance of the symbol and why it holds meaning. As a part of this lesson an excursion could be planned to Sydney town hall (http://www.sydneytownhall.com.au/schools-symbolism-and-identity.asp) as well as the museum of Sydney (http://www.hht.net.au/museums/mos).

 

 

 

more...
Catherine Smyth's curator insight, May 6, 2013 5:12 AM

What life was like... Primary sources and the history of Sydney.

Scooped by Eric Jewson
Scoop.it!

Who are we?

Eric Jewson's insight:

This site gives an informative look at cultural identity and what makes that important. It provides lots of exercises for kids and looks at cultural icons internationally.

 

This could be used as a resource to plan lessons on looking at identity on a local, national and global scale. It starts to present the idea of a global identity and can be used to provide exercises for kids about how they would represent that unified global culture.

 

This is a useful tool for discovering global perspectives, and explores how language, symbols, customs and events all play a significant role in creating identity. As a classroom task children could be asked to try to find out about their own country, or they could pick one that they are interested in. The children could then try to find the coat of arms, national anthem, national animals, birds, stones and national dress for their country and present the meaning behind these things to the class. It would help to teach the kids about the vast differences in culture between the countries and perhaps teach them a little about the history of the country at the same time.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Eric Jewson
Scoop.it!

Newtown Project

Newtown Project | Symbols and cultural identity | Scoop.it
A critical resource on the history of
the Municipality of Newtown
Eric Jewson's insight:

This website looks at the history of Newtown and its people. It presents important people and places in Newtown's history sometimes through writing from the time or audio files as well as artwork. There is a lot of information about the schools and important buildings and architecture in Newtown.

 

Especially interesting is the look at the history of the Gadigal people.There is a lot of detail about the history of the people in the area and their place in the society. This section has topics on sports, law, activism, school and many others.

 

There is an emphasis on places of cultural importance in Newtown, those that are recognisable as symbols of the area such as the "I have a dream" mural on King st but also other street art in the area.

It could be used as a research exercise in seeing how the identity of Newtown has changed and how it has stayed the same throughout its history. Students could look at the history of the area and identify cultural icons that are significant to them.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=5QLlQqWIzO0#!
A nice video on Newtown, celebrating 150 years since its proclamation as a municipality.
“Newtown residents pride themselves on strong community, progressive ideas, creativity, acceptance and environmental awareness,” the Lord Mayor Clover Moore (http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/learn/history/people-and-places/newtown-sesquicentenary)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Eric Jewson
Scoop.it!

Aboriginal People and Place

Aboriginal People and Place | Symbols and cultural identity | Scoop.it
Thematic history of Aboriginal People and Place
Eric Jewson's insight:

The Aboriginal people have a vast history with the land where Sydney now resides and they remain an important part of our community, culture and history. This source provides insight into that connection with in depth views of the important events, people and culture of the Aboriginal people of the land. It has ackowledged the role that Aboriginal people must play in their transfer of knowledge if we are to learn about their sense of community and connection to the land which existed long before white settlers were here. The inclusion of audio files from various speakers and images along with the text add to the learning experience. The source is useful as it is written by Aboriginal people with their input and acknowledgement so it provides a less heard tale of events.

 

To utilise this source in a classroom the class could be split into different groups and investigate a significant event that has happened in Aboriginal history. Another example would be to go on an excursion to see Aboriginal artwork, for instance in the museum of Sydney which it is mentioned is on Cadigal peoples land and has Aboriginal artwork. After viewing it the children could talk about symbols they saw in the paintings or sculptures and talk about their meaning. Alternatively in small groups the students could choose (or be allocated) a significant Aboriginal person and have to find out what they can about them to present to the class.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Eric Jewson
Scoop.it!

It's an Honour - Symbols

It's an Honour - Symbols | Symbols and cultural identity | Scoop.it
Eric Jewson's insight:

An interesting site looking at the different symbols that represent Australia. The site also raises the questions of why each of those symbols represent Australia and answers how and when the symbols were chosen.

 

There is a lot of good information for teachers on here with quizzes and factsheets about the national flag, anthem, flower, gemstone and colours. There are also good explanations of what the symbols are meant to represent. There is also information on other Australian flags, such as the Australian Aboriginal flag and the Torres Strait Islander flag.

Great for stage 2 learners looking at culture and identity, specifically, how symbols contribute to Australian identity. As a task students could be asked to look at the meaning behind the Australian flag and how it displays our national identity. It would be interesting to see how many of the students understood the symbolism behind the Australian flag, the Australian Aboriginal flag and the Torres Strait Islander flag, and whether they had seen them all before.

 

After the students had an understanding of Australian symbolism, they could also look at flags from other countries. Here are a few examples in a video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubfpwcUfCrE

more...
No comment yet.