Sydney Harbour Bridge: Then and Now
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The man behind the most famous sign seen from Sydney's Harbour Bridge - The Guardian

The man behind the most famous sign seen from Sydney's Harbour Bridge - The Guardian | Sydney Harbour Bridge: Then and Now | Scoop.it
The man behind the most famous sign seen from Sydney's Harbour Bridge
The Guardian
The addition of a newsagent's lightbox means the hand-painted black lettering that says "One way! Jesus" is also visible at night.
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BridgeClimb in 360°

BridgeClimb in 360° | Sydney Harbour Bridge: Then and Now | Scoop.it

BridgeClimb has joined forces with Destination NSW to give you a view of the climb in 360 degrees.

Ronni Polhill's insight:

This is a great interactive video which allows you to pretend you are climbing the Bridge. It allows you to upload a photo of yourself onto the face of someone climbing the Bridge, to control the camera view and "look around", and to pause the video to look at more things in detail. Hopefully the appeal of this particular technology will increase the motivation of certain children to learn (Passey et al., 2004 in Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 181). Individual students can upload a picture of themselves onto the video to watch themselves climbing the Bridge. This would be a great opening activity for a unit studying the Bridge, as it gives them opportunity to explore the structure and its surrounding area. In class, they could watch it twice, looking for different things each time:

 

1. Watch it for features of the Bridge and first things they notice about it - how high it is, how it was constructed, what transport uses it.

 

2. Watch it to geographically locate the Sydney Harbour Bridge in its local area and identify other key features surrounding it (Opera House, CBD, Botanic Gardens, Luna Park, The Rocks, Darling Harbour). Using a printout map of the CBD from Google Maps, see what buildings or features the students can locate and label from the video.

 

Having now "located" the Bridge, the students will have a better context for thinking about its history as an icon and the different ways it has been used.

 

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching humanities and social sciences. 4th ed. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning.

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National Sorry Day

National Sorry Day | Sydney Harbour Bridge: Then and Now | Scoop.it
This collection examines the history of Sorry Day and its significance in the nation's political and social history.
Ronni Polhill's insight:

This is an interactive book entitled "National Sorry Day" and created by Education Services Australia Ltd and ABC and publicised on the ABC Splash education website. It includes short text bites, as well as short film clips from ABC news programs. This is a helpful resource for showing students one of the more unconventional ways the Sydney Harbour Bridge has been used as a space in Australia's recent history.

 

In relation to the Sydney Harbour Bridge, it provides some information on the Corroboree 2000 Bridge Walk and helps to fit this event into the bigger picture of the move for Aboriginal reconciliation in Australia's history. Students will be challenged to see the Bridge not just as functional infrastructure, but also a place of protest. In terms of its specific relationship to outcomes, teachers can use the 2000 Bridge Walk as a springboard into discussions of the national issue of reconciliation, and help children to explain the process of changes in views amongst the community, and evaluate the effects on different individuals and Aboriginal groups -Outcome CCS2.2 (Board of Studies, 2006, p. 20).

 

This resource is too old for children in Stage 2 to explore directly (designed for Year 10), but there is some helpful footage within this resource which could be shown directly in class (particularly the footage of the actual walk). Part of a classroom activity could involve finding out a bit more about why there was a call for the Prime Minister to say "sorry", and this part of the unit could be a lead in to a change and continuity unit on the Stolen Generation.

 

In terms of evaluating this resource as an Indigenous resource, as per the Aboriginal education K-12 resource guide (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2003), I would argue its authenticity is strong as it uses up-to date and relevant information from actual news reports run by the ABC. It is fairly balanced & presents warnings in the filmclips about potential using footage of a deceased person. However, one of the negatives is a lack of acknowledgement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participation in the formation of the resource (although some of the news reports do interview these participants).

 

 

Board of Studies (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6. NSW: Board of Studies.

 

NSW Department of Education and Training (2003). Aboriginal Education K-12: Resource Guide.

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Breakfast on the Bridge | Photos

Breakfast on the Bridge | Photos | Sydney Harbour Bridge: Then and Now | Scoop.it

"6000 Sydneysiders walked onto a grass covered Sydney Harbour Bridge yesterday morning for the first ever Breakfast on the Bridge."

Ronni Polhill's insight:

This is a blog containing a series of photos from the 2009 "Breakfast on the Bridge". A great way this resource could be used would be to help students engage with the ways popular culture has influenced the way the Bridge is used. This would be a  way to encourage them to engage in discussions about this current local event, and to brainstorm why the Bridge is being used this way and how this differs from ways its been used in the past.

These photos could also become the basis for a literacy-based activity designed to develop students as "text users". Students could be encouraged to produce texts based on an understanding of these pictures and their own creativity (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 163)

 

Lesson:

"What would you normally expect to see on a bridge?", asking the kids to name things (cars, pylons, pedestrians, trains).

Then, the teacher could ask:

"Would you expect to see cows?" - showing the relevant photo

"Trees?" - showing the photo

"Picnics?" - showing the photo

 
The children could then be encouraged to brainstorm or research other unconventional ways the bridge is used today (e.g. Sydney Running Festival & Sydney Cycle, NYE). Then in groups as an assessment, students could be asked to create an advertisement for a NEW event that they have invented on Sydney Harbour Bridge.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching humanities and social sciences. 4th ed. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning.

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Chocolate Sydney Harbour Bridge fireworks HOW TO COOK THAT Ann Reardon - YouTube

Chocolate Sydney Harbour Bridge: yum!

 

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The Opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge - YouTube

This newsreel footage with on-the-spot commentary contains unique coverage of the official opening ceremony of the Sydney Harbour Bridge on Saturday 19 March 1932.

 

Ronni Polhill's insight:

This video is a actual newsreel footage from the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge in 1932. Its real advantage is that it brings to life the history of this place for the viewer. As a primary source, it provides opportunities for children to become historians themselves. The first 5 minutes would be great as an observation activity right at the start of a unit of work. One key element of this viewing would be looking at the parade of different floats, as it presents a snapshot of important events in Australia's history. Students might be encouraged to evaluate for themselves whether the building of the Bridge should be considered one of these important events and why. These activities can help them to achieve the outcome CCS2.2 in the following areas:

 

- "identifies the contributions of some significant...events to community heritage."

-"distinguishes between primary and secondary source
material when acquiring information" (Board of Studies, 2006, p. 25)

 

I might combine this resource with some of the activities and documents about the Bridge's construction made available by the Australian Government funded National Centre For History Education  (http://www.hyperhistory.org/index.php?option=displaypage&Itemid=489&op=page). Student Activites: Part 1" provides a helpful progression of 5 activities. This would be great for students of all abilities; some students could focus on 1-2 activities, while those who are more gifted could work their way up to all 5.  This could even be used as the basis for a longer assignment, where the students have to produce a poster covering each area. 

 

Board of Studies (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6. NSW: Board of Studies.

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Sydney's Harbour Bridge lights turned off for Earth Hour

Sydney's Harbour Bridge lights turned off for Earth Hour | Sydney Harbour Bridge: Then and Now | Scoop.it
The Sydney Harbour Bridge has switched off its lights for Earth Hour and will be among thousands of homes and businesses around the globe, to switch off power for an hour from 8.30pm.
Ronni Polhill's insight:

This is an article from a British broadcaster ITV showing images of the Sydney Harbour Bridge lights being turned off for Earth Hour. It showcases the Bridge as a global icon taking part in the global activity that is Earth Hour. These images, in conjunction with images of other world landmarks with their lights off (http://www.itv.com/news/2014-03-30/world-landmarks-switch-off-lights-for-earth-hour/), help to show the interconnectedness of our globe.

 

This is a great resource for highlighting the global nature of events and issues such as sustainability. It ties in heavily with both the “interdependence and globalisation” and  “sustainable futures” learning emphases in global education, and particularly identifying and exploring “opportunities to participate in and influence decision-making locally, nationally, regionally & internationally” (Global Perspectives, 2008, p. 12). It also ties in particularly with the Environment Outcome ENS2.5 (Describes places in the local area and other parts of Australia and explains their significance) in:

-"gives reasons why particular activities may be associated with particular...built and heritage features" (Board of Studies, 2006, p. 31) e.g. thinking about why the Bridge took part in an Earth Hour demonstration.

 

As part of their learning, children could be encouraged to find out what Earth Hour is about. Students will also be able to see how a local event became a global event, because Earth Hour began in Australia and has now spread to the rest of the world.

 

There is a potential danger that is idea of sustainability on a global level is too abstract for a Stage 2 student developmentally. The best way to counter that is to ground this education in the young peoples' own lives, their own place, their own environment, giving them opportunities to have direct experiences with nature (Gilbert & Hoepper 2011, p. 358). This could be done using the "Saving our Resources" activity from "Thinking Globally" (Browett & Ashman, 2010, p.128) or a specific Earth Hour lesson plan designed by Cool Australia (http://coolaustralia.org/activity/earth-hour-how-does-changing-weather-affect-our-environment-year-3-4/). A follow on activity could be to encourage students to work out how they can help the school community to participate in Earth Hour, perhaps devising a presentation for assembly.

 

 

Board of Studies (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6. NSW: Board of Studies.

Browett, J. & Ashman, G. (2010). Thinking Globally: Global Perspectives in the early years classroom. Education Services Australia.

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching humanities and social sciences. 4th ed. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning.

(2008). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian schools. Education Services Australia.

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