Sustentabilidad Ambiental
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Las 5 erres: reutilizar, reducir, reparar, reciclar y regular

Las 5 erres: reutilizar, reducir, reparar, reciclar y regular | Sustentabilidad Ambiental | Scoop.it

Desde pequeños nos enseñan en el colegio, en las excursiones a la granja escuela y centros de reciclaje la regla de las tres erres: reutilizar, reciclar y reducir. Estos son, por así decirlo, los pilares que hasta ahora debíamos seguir para que los recursos que explotamos no fuesen un problema ambiental. En este artículo hablaré de las 5 erres, poniendo sobre el tapete otras dos nuevas que complementan, desde mi punto de vista, de manera crucial la gestión de residuos.


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Husband-wife team sets up city farm to offer urban residents wider varieties ... - St. Louis Beacon

Husband-wife team sets up city farm to offer urban residents wider varieties ...St. Louis BeaconCarlos Villarreal is a photo lab manager, and his wife, Jeri, is an IT worker.

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Organic Agriculture Boosts Biodiversity On Farmlands - Science News - redOrbit

Organic Agriculture Boosts Biodiversity On Farmlands - Science News - redOrbit | Sustentabilidad Ambiental | Scoop.it

Does organic farming foster biodiversity? The answer is yes, however, the number of habitats on the land plays an important role alongside the type and intensity of farming practices. These are the findings of an international study that looked at ten regions in Europe and two in Africa. The results has been published in Nature Communications. The study shows that even organic farms have to actively support biodiversity by, for example, conserving different habitats on their holdings.

An international team, including scientists from Technische Universität München (TUM), investigated the contribution of organic farming to supporting farmland biodiversity between 2010 and 2013. Researchers wanted to explore whether organic farms are home to more species than their conventional neighbors. The team used uniform methods across Europe to capture data and analyze it to establish the impact of farming methods and intensity and of landscape features on biodiversity.

“Organic farming is beneficial to the richness of plant and bee species. However, observed benefits concentrate on arable fields,” says TUM’s Prof. Kurt-Jürgen Hülsbergen. His Chair for Organic Agriculture and Agronomy analyzed 16 Bavarian dairy farms.

The study investigated farms in twelve regions with different production systems. In each region, farms were selected randomly, half of them certified organic for at least five years. In Switzerland, grassland-based cattle farms were studied and in Austria the study looked at arable farms. In Italy and Spain, researchers focused on farms with permanent crops such as wine and olives, and on small-scale subsistence farms in Uganda.

More species because of field boundaries

More species were found in organic arable fields than in non-organic fields. In contrast, there was little difference in grasslands or vineyards. Organic farming benefited the four taxonomic groups of plants, earthworms, spiders and bees – which were sampled as surrogates for the multitude of creatures living on farmland – in different ways. In general, more species of plants and bees were found on organic than on non-organic fields, but not more species of spiders and earthworms.

If types of field boundaries such as grass verges or hedges were included in the comparison, the difference between organic and non-organic decreases. “Obviously, most species found in fields on organic farms tend to be concentrated in boundary areas on non-organic farms. There was little difference in the total number of species on the farms,” explains Max Kainz, who headed the sub-project at TUM. The occurrence of rare or threatened species did not increase on organic farms, according to Kainz.

Even organic farms need to increase habitats

To sustain farmland biodiversity, which is currently under grave threat, researchers have identified complement organic farming methods with dedicated efforts to conserve habitats. To increase the number of habitats, the authors of the study recommend adding structural elements, such as woods, grass verges and fallow land, to farms. “Surprisingly, viewed across all regions, we did not find a higher number of natural habitats on organic farms than non-organic farms,” reports Kainz.

“However, it was clear that habitat diversity is the key to species diversity,” adds Prof. Hülsbergen. He continues: “The results of the study underline the importance of maintaining and expanding natural landscape features – something that the EU’s Greening Program has been trying to accomplish.” If these additional habitats are different to the rest of the farm, for example hedges in grassland farms or herbaceous strips in arable farms, they have a huge impact on the biodiversity of a farm.


Read more at http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1113180754/organic-agriculture-boosts-biodiversity-on-farmlands/#FQDqm1cKGxPdIGXT.99

 

 

 

 


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Burundi farmers teach each other how to farm more efficiently

Burundi farmers teach each other how to farm more efficiently | Sustentabilidad Ambiental | Scoop.it
In July, an open day was held in the village communities of Makebuko and Bukirasazi in Burundi. The aim was to demonstrate the success of SCAD, a collaborative project set up by Alterra, Achmea and HealthNetTPO, which employs an integrated approach to improve both the food production and the social security of the local population.

 

wageningenur.nl/en/newsarticle/Burundi-farmers-teach-each-other-how-to-farm-more-efficiently.htm

 


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Vídeo de terapias | Burros para tratar el alzhéimer o autismo | EITB Vídeos

Vídeo de terapias | Burros para tratar el alzhéimer o autismo | EITB Vídeos | Sustentabilidad Ambiental | Scoop.it
Vídeo de teraspias. Cada más terapeutas confían en las terapias con burros para tratar a enfermos de alzhéimer, autismo o discapacitados. Granja-escuela...

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Los corderos cortarán el césped de los jardines de París

Los corderos cortarán el césped de los jardines de París | Sustentabilidad Ambiental | Scoop.it

Olvide las máquinas cortacéspedes y las desbrozadoras, ponga una oveja en su jardín. Es lo que ha hecho el Ayuntamiento de París, que de forma experimental reclutará rebaños de ovinos para que sieguen la hierba de un modo barato, silencioso y ecológico. El eco-pastoreo, que así se llama el invento, tiene las ventajas de que reduce el consumo de combustible y abona el terreno de forma natural. Lo malo del asunto es que también supone un ahorro en mano de obra, y tal y como están las filas del desempleo, las ovejas pueden ser destinatarias de mucha inquina.


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Pequeños gritones, por Susanna Tamaro

Pequeños gritones, por Susanna Tamaro | Sustentabilidad Ambiental | Scoop.it

Vivo en el campo desde hace muchos años y mis oídos están habituados a un sonido ambiente muy distinto del de las ciudades. No es que el campo sea, como muchos creen, un lugar de silencio, más bien al contrario. Pero se trata de una gama amplia y diversa de ruidos (el balido de las ovejas, el canto de los pájaros), carentes de esa densidad machacona de los de la gran ciudad


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Green Energy Jobs Surge Just in Time for Labor Day

Green Energy Jobs Surge Just in Time for Labor Day | Sustentabilidad Ambiental | Scoop.it
Some 12,500 jobs were added in the second quarter of 2014, double the number of the first quarter.

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Zero Waste World

Zero Waste World | Sustentabilidad Ambiental | Scoop.it
When the economy goes in circles, everybody wins.

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Shaun Scallan's curator insight, September 4, 2014 6:29 PM

Circular economy means there is no waste, only input for other processes.  Some real examples of what is available to encourage us to build systems that emulate nature and restore balance.

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En Isla de Pascua dan el vamos a concurso nacional de reciclaje ... - El Dínamo

En Isla de Pascua dan el vamos a concurso nacional de reciclaje ... - El Dínamo | Sustentabilidad Ambiental | Scoop.it
En Isla de Pascua dan el vamos a concurso nacional de reciclaje ...
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Grow Our Own ~ An Allotment Blog: Allotmentherapy - The Wisdom of Plants

Grow Our Own ~ An Allotment Blog: Allotmentherapy - The Wisdom of Plants | Sustentabilidad Ambiental | Scoop.it

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Bees can spot which flowers offer best rewards before landing | Farming Futures

Bees can spot which flowers offer best rewards before landing | Farming Futures | Sustentabilidad Ambiental | Scoop.it

Bumblebees are able to connect differences in pollen quality with floral features like petal colour, and so land only on the flowers that offer the best rewards, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Exeter.

Unlike nectar, bees do not ingest pollen whilst foraging on flowers, and so until now it has been unclear whether they are able to form associative relationships between what a flower looks like and the quality of its pollen. The study used bumblebee foragers, housed under controlled conditions to test whether they do learn about flowers during pollen collection.

The findings indicate that pollen foraging behaviour involves learning and individual decision-making, which may allow bees to quickly learn which flowers provide the most nutritious pollen rewards for rearing their young.

The experiments involved manipulating the quality of pollen offered to the bees by diluting the samples. The researchers examined what they preferred to collect, if they could differentiate quality before landing by only letting the bees smell and see the pollen rather than probing it; and presenting the bees with four different coloured discs containing stronger and less diluted pollen to record preferences and change of preferences over time.

'Bees associate colour cues with differences in pollen rewards' by Elizabeth Nicholls and Natalie Hempel de Ibarra is published in the Journal of Experimental Biology.

From: http://bbsrc.ac.uk/news/food-security/2014/140731-pr-bees-spot-best-flow...


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Sanatana Pages: Organic farming and the centrality of the cow

Sanatana Pages: Organic farming and the centrality of the cow | Sustentabilidad Ambiental | Scoop.it

Subhash Palekar Raises Agriculture to Spiritual Levels

For over sixty years, Indian agriculture was in a slumber. Our lands were scandalized by an unknown thing called as synthetic fertlizer. This was done to help the farmer get a 'better' harvest.

As the farmer started using it, he immediately noticed that, his soil had become infertile and could no longer bear crops for the next season. He was advised to add more and more fertilizer to the soil to compensate for the nutrient loss. Soon he was faced with another threat. The plants that grew with fertilizer needed pesticides. Soon, he started using these pesticides, which are deadly poisons. He noticed that the pests had become resistant to these chemicals as time went by. He was puzzled.

Our farmer forgot the ancient lesson that the soil HAD LIFE. He forgot that there were natural laws that governed the soil which his ancestors had obeyed from time immemorial. By thus obeying the laws , they had taken bumper harvests and had kept the land well cared for and transferred the land intact for posterity.

Subhash Palekar

It was at this time that a great mind set out to work in this field. He himself was a graduate of Agricultural science from a 'modern university'. He set out to work in his field using the British devised ways of Fertlisers and Pesticides and became an utter failure. He also ruined his land.

Then he set out to research on how our ancestors did so well in Agriculture without any of these chemicals. He consulted the Vedas, and the ancient wisdom literature. The result is a revolutionary, path breaking method, which Sri Subhash calls as 'Zero Budget Natural Farming'. Sri Subhash tried his method in his own soil and replicated it in various other fields tasting success every time.

An inspired Sri Subhash set out to teach this method to his countrymen. He has so far conducted not less than 1000 workshops, all heavily attended, to spread this new way of life for farmers.

The fundamental concept in Sri Subhash's work is that
1. Soil does not need nutrients to be added.
2. The soil has micro organisms which GENERATE NUTRIENTS for the soil.
3. It is possible to revive a fertliser damaged soil back to the natural ways.
4. That the new method require no money to do Agriculture.

Fascinating, is it not ? Read on for some more.

Sri Subhash says the pivot of 'Zero Budget Natural Farming' is the desi cow. He says that the desi cow's Urine, Cow dung and Milk have all the qualities required to rejuvenate the soil. Just ONE desi cow, says Sri Subhash, is all that is required to maintain a 30 acre Farm. He laments that the Desi- Jersi hybrid cows are of no use in his scheme of things.

What a sad thing ? The desi (country) cow is now has such a dwindling population that we need to revive them on a war footing. I wondered why the hybrid Jersi cow is unfit. A publication of 'Govardan', a voluntary organisation for Cow protection, says that the high yield Jersi was produced by crossing a wild pig and an Australian cow breed !

Sri Subhash has some formulas to revive the soil. One is 'Jeevamrutam'. This is not a replacement for Fertlizer , he says. Jeevamrutam is only a catalyst for the soil to generate its nutrients. He says that the 'organic manure','earthworm manure' are fads and are another recipe for disaster.

Sri Subhash condemns the university taught concept of burning the leftover plants after harvest. He says that these are to be left over in the soil itself by turning them over into the soil. This process of 'Mulching' helps the soil prepare its own manure.

And what about pests ? Subhash maintains that a naturally grown plant fights pests. But the plants in transit in chemical ravaged field can be protected by simply prepared 'natural pesticides' which arwe usually buttermilk, pepper and such simple combinations.

The Government Sponsored Chemical Mafia

A govermental survey states that the fertliser subsidy alone was abot Rs 13,000.00 crores in the year 2000. Add to this the pesticide subsidy and the farmer's burden. A report says that the pesticide business in India is the fourth largest in the world! Imagine what would have happened if the money is spent on raising desi cows, strengthening ponds and lakes, and protecting the village fiorests !

There are some criminal agricultural scientists who sit and lord over every governmental commission on Agriculture. These are the very people who are in hand in glove with the synthetic mafia and have been the cause of so much decline in production. Sri Subhash has alleged that our country imports foodgrains of about 5 million tonnes every year. This fact is not known to many Indians. The governments cheats here also.

Recently, a central minister went on record stating that poor Indians are eating more and this is causing problems. It is no wonder with such people at the helm, our Agriculture remains without policy.


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Brandon Chesney's curator insight, May 27, 2015 8:25 AM

This farmer in India had been using synthetic fertilizer to grow his crops. Because he used this he noticed that the soil became Infertile and he couldn't grow new crops for the next season. Since he could not grow anymore crops he started using more and more fertilizers which in turn led to having to use Pesticides. He had forgot the whole kind of law set in place about how the soil has life and was better than any other fertilizers or pesticides.

Neohouse's comment, July 27, 2017 6:04 AM
Woa bài viết rấy hay . Mong nhận được nhiều bài viết từ bạn
Emilia Morales's curator insight, November 30, 2017 12:06 PM
soil is naturally full of rich nutrients that aid crops in growing. It doesn't need chemical fertilizers. 
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Las 5 erres: reutilizar, reducir, reparar, reciclar y regular

Las 5 erres: reutilizar, reducir, reparar, reciclar y regular | Sustentabilidad Ambiental | Scoop.it

Desde pequeños nos enseñan en el colegio, en las excursiones a la granja escuela y centros de reciclaje la regla de las tres erres: reutilizar, reciclar y reducir. Estos son, por así decirlo, los pilares que hasta ahora debíamos seguir para que los recursos que explotamos no fuesen un problema ambiental. En este artículo hablaré de las 5 erres, poniendo sobre el tapete otras dos nuevas que complementan, desde mi punto de vista, de manera crucial la gestión de residuos.


Via Gumersindo Fernández
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¿Sirve de algo contar ovejas para dormir?

¿Sirve de algo contar ovejas para dormir? | Sustentabilidad Ambiental | Scoop.it
Muy Interesante. ¿Sirve de algo contar ovejas para dormir? .
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Will Brazil elect Marina Silva as the world's first Green president?

Will Brazil elect Marina Silva as the world's first Green president? | Sustentabilidad Ambiental | Scoop.it
Born into a poor, mixed-race Amazon family, Marina Silva is on the verge of a stunning election win weeks after taking over her party

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Willy De Backer's curator insight, August 31, 2014 3:15 AM

Very interesting development in Brazil.

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Garden cities and smart cities: the business case for urban regeneration

Garden cities and smart cities: the business case for urban regeneration | Sustentabilidad Ambiental | Scoop.it
Housing shortages mean the government's idea of garden cities has an appeal, but the jobs and economic activities that go with homes must also be tackled (#Helsinki aspires to have a car-free city, using ride-sharing apps, taxis, car pools and travel...

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La carta de un "salvaje" - Radio Bío-Bío

La carta de un "salvaje" - Radio Bío-Bío | Sustentabilidad Ambiental | Scoop.it
Radio Bío-Bío La carta de un "salvaje" Radio Bío-Bío Si no somos capaces de abrazar medidas que regulen el reciclaje, el control de gases expelidos al ambiente o la educación de nuestros niños, en un corto plazo tendremos problemas irreversibles y...
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