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Rescooped by Leonardo Mino from Climate change challenges
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Climate change is a 'medical emergency,' report suggests

Climate change is a 'medical emergency,' report suggests | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it
A commission reports that climate change is inextricably linked with public health, and that tackling climate change presents an opportunity to improve public health worldwide.

Via Cathryn Wellner
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Rescooped by Leonardo Mino from WHY IT MATTERS: Digital Transformation
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Barcelona has defined a "city OS" to coordinate its digital communication network

Barcelona has defined a "city OS" to coordinate its digital communication network | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it

Via Farid Mheir
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Farid Mheir's curator insight, October 25, 2014 4:50 PM

Truly inspiring to see that Barcelona has established an "operating system" for the city (city OS) that connects all of the sensors (street lights, parking meters, cameras, etc.) to make their data accessible for different applications and analytics opportunities.


Rescooped by Leonardo Mino from WHY IT MATTERS: Digital Transformation
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6 Ways Autonomous Cars Could Change Everything via @fastcompany

6 Ways Autonomous Cars Could Change Everything via @fastcompany | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it

Autonomous cars could also have all sorts of unanticipated effects, like reversing urbanization and putting an end to parking.


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Farid Mheir's curator insight, October 19, 2014 9:06 AM
Reverse urbanization, end of parking are some of the ways autonomous cars may change our lives. What would the impact on business be? Continuous delivery, where delivery vans make delivery routes 24-7?Predictive support, where support personnel are dispatched throughout an area where their service may be needed in the future, working in the car in between jobs?Warehouse on wheels, with high velocity items made available for order online and delivery in minutes?Travelling office, where sales team work out of small vans as they travel from one client to the next?
Mark Muller's curator insight, October 19, 2014 7:26 PM

I think autonomous (self-driving) cars will be the next major revolution in real estate. An autonomous campervan or bus could easile be converted into a mobile office or retail shop, eliminating the need for leasing a fixed tenancy.

 

Imagine a small office could be totally run from a moving bus, even picking up employees from home or train stations and transporting them to meetings as others work inside.

 

Maybe future landlords will lease both fixed and mobile property? 

Rescooped by Leonardo Mino from WHY IT MATTERS: Digital Transformation
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The disruptive aspect of Smart Cities via @frankdiana

The disruptive aspect of Smart Cities via @frankdiana | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it
Next up in this ongoing look at disruptive scenarios is the Smart City. For the first time in history, more than 50% of the world’s population lives in cities, and that percentage moves to 70% by 2...

Via Farid Mheir
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Farid Mheir's curator insight, October 25, 2014 5:18 PM

Frank Diana presents some very interesting examples of what a smart city can be and why it represents a major disruption in the future.

Social Media Online Marketing's curator insight, October 27, 2014 6:18 AM

#SocialMediaMonitoring & #SocialMediaAnalytics

Rescooped by Leonardo Mino from New Web 2.0 tools for education
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10 Ways to Show Your iPad on a Projector Screen

10 Ways to Show Your iPad on a Projector Screen | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it
Teachers really like the ability to display their iPad or their students'
iPads on a projector screen. Projecting on a large screen is great for
demonstrations, simulations, explanations, and showing examples. There are
several ways this can be done in the classroom. Read the post for more
information and for a handy chart.

Via Kathleen Cercone
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Ian Rennie's curator insight, October 2, 2014 11:29 AM

If this works in college I will be amazed and rather pleased

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8 Ways to Make Your Presentation More Interactive

8 Ways to Make Your Presentation More Interactive | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it
In a recent survey we conducted with the help of Harris Poll, almost half
of the respondents admitted to doing something other than listening during
a co-worker’s presentation—popular answers included sending a text message
(28 percent), checking email (27 percent), and falling asleep (17 percent).
To say the least, it can be difficult to hold an audience’s attention, let
alone get your message across when presenting. By making your presentation
more interactive, you can help your audience
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, October 25, 2014 5:27 PM

Presenting and teaching are similar so some of this might work for teaching as well.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production

World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it
The last section of dam is being blasted from the Elwha River on Washington's Olympic Peninsula on Tuesday.


For almost half a century, the two dams were widely applauded for powering the growth of the peninsula and its primary industry. But the dams blocked salmon migration up the Elwha, devastating its fish and shellfish—and the livelihood of the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe. As the tribe slowly gained political power—it won federal recognition in 1968—it and other tribes began to protest the loss of the fishing rights promised to them by federal treaty in the mid-1800s. In 1979, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Washington tribes, including the Elwha Klallam, were entitled to half the salmon catch in the state.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2014 1:16 PM

See also this video to see the rapid changes on the nearby White Salmon River when they removed the dam. 


Tags: biogeography, environment, land use, sustainability, environment adapt.

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Peak Oil: The End of the Oil Age

Peak Oil: The End of the Oil Age | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it

"It has taken between 50-300 million years to form, and yet we have managed to burn roughly half of all global oil reserves in merely 125 years or so."


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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:28 AM

Peak Oil: The End of the Oil Age

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 11:40 AM

Resources shape the behavior of people living in a given geographical region. On Earth, the abundance and efficiency of oil has caused our societies to be built and operated with the use of oil. Human's needed fuel and found oil to be a natural resource that could fit their needs. But all good things must come to an end. Even though oil and gas are cheap and efficient ways of fueling our society, there are disastrous consequences like environmental degregation and over dependence on foreign oil that leads countries to be entangled in conflict that cost lives everyday. Now that we have the analytically tools to project when oil will run out it allows people to reevaluate their use of oil and gas and weigh the cost of using a resources that will eventually run out and leave the earth in ecological distress. The global oil reserves have been cut in half in just 125 years, although this use of oil led to many technological and medical advances that propelled society into an age of advancement unprecedented it is time to pull back the reigns and calibrate our expectations on how much oil and gas we should keep using.

Molly McComb's curator insight, May 27, 2015 11:11 AM

Talking how the global oil and gas output has decreased and how it will decrease in the future with the creation and use of other forms of energy. 

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6 Principles Of Genius Hour In The Classroom

6 Principles Of Genius Hour In The Classroom | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it
6 Principles Of Genius Hour In The Classroom

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Eileen Forsyth's curator insight, October 10, 2014 11:54 AM

In other words, my independent study...

Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, October 12, 2014 6:46 AM

6 principios da "Hora Genial " na Sala de aula:

Hora Genial permite liberdade aos aprendizes para desenharem sua aprendizagem. durante o periodo da aula. Sao estimulados a explorarem suas proprias curiosidades, e construirem e organziarem seu conheimento durante a aula. Para que isso se concretize, devem seguir os 6 principios:


1- regra 80/20

2- socializacao

3- criacao

4- requerimento de informacao

5- consolidacao (desenho)

6- proposito


Miguel Damiani's curator insight, October 12, 2014 1:12 PM

Seis principios que todo profesor debe tener en cuenta en su clase

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Welcome to the Anthropocene

"A 3-minute journey through the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. The film charts the growth of humanity into a global force on the equivalent scale to major geological processes."


Via Seth Dixon
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Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, September 24, 2014 11:55 AM

El Antropoceno,  nueva era geológica

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 11:33 AM

Summer reading KQ1: How has the Earth's environment changed over time?

Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 2016 7:44 PM

Many geologists and other scientists now recognize that we are in a new geologic era.  This new era, called the Anthropocene, is distinguished by the fact that one species (homo sapiens), is dramatically modifying the environment. These modifications are impacting geologic processes to such a degree that this time period is geologically distinct (see this remote sensing interactive for examples of environmental change).  Paul Crutzen, a Nobel Prize–winning scientist who champions the term Anthropocene declared, “It’s no longer us against ‘Nature.’ Instead, it’s we who decide what nature is and what it will be.”  This video is a great primer for discussing the nature and extent of human and environmental interactions as related to industrialization, globalization and climate change.  This is definitely one of my favorite resources. 

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5 Key Themes Emerging From the 'New Science of Cities'

5 Key Themes Emerging From the 'New Science of Cities' | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it
In the most innovative incubators of urban research, the lessons of Jane Jacobs are more vital than ever.

 

In the past few years, a remarkable body of scientific research has begun to shed new light on the dynamic behavior of cities, carrying important implications for city-makers. Researchers at cutting-edge hubs of urban theory like the University College London and the Santa Fe Institute have been homing in on some key properties of urban systems—and contradicting much of today's orthodoxy. Their findings have begun to feed into recent and upcoming gatherings on the future of cities—including lead-in events for the U.N.'s big 2016 Habitat III conference on sustainable development—and arming leaders in the field with new ammunition in the global battle against sprawl.


Tags: density, urbanism, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities, labor.



Via Seth Dixon
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A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates

A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it

"In a paper published Thursday in Science, demographers from several universities and the United Nations Population Division conclude that instead of leveling off in the second half of the 21st century, as the UN predicted less than a decade ago, the world's population will continue to grow beyond 2100."


Via Seth Dixon
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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:23 AM

It is interesting to see the demographic transition model in real life effect. As time passes, underdeveloped countries will enter stage 3 of the demographic transition model and see a decline in birth rate and death rate remains relatively low. Most developing countries now will enter the very end of stage 3 and even stage 4 as birth rates balance of death rates. The real question is whether or not Earth will be able to sustain 11 billion people. It is scary to see the world in a rapid population boom. This population growth relates to the agricultural unit in that the use of GMO's is to accommodate the rapidly growing populations in the world.

Aaron Burnette's curator insight, September 8, 2015 9:25 AM

The population was originally predicted to level off in the next half century, but this is not the case by a long-shot, as predicted by the UN.

AHS Model UN's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:12 PM

These articles from the Guardian and National Geographic were the first I'd heard of the new population projections for the future.  For many years it was assumed that the global population would level out at around 9 billion; while that is still within the range of possibilities but these new projections indicate that it is much more likely that the total global population will be much higher than that.  The geographic implications of this are far reaching.   

 

Tag: population, demographic transition model, unit 2 population.

Rescooped by Leonardo Mino from Geography Education
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Geography Soup

"A great resource full of great links to accompany the Geography Soup channel on Vimeo."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 3, 2014 7:19 PM

Geography Soup is a Vimeo channel designed to include interesting videos that are laden with geographic content in them.  This powerpoint slideshow has resources designed to help you get the most flavor and substance out of these (and any other) video resources.  This is especially great for K-12 students, physical and regional geography.


Tags: K12, video.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:22 PM

Course resource

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Climate change is a 'medical emergency,' report suggests

Climate change is a 'medical emergency,' report suggests | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it
A commission reports that climate change is inextricably linked with public health, and that tackling climate change presents an opportunity to improve public health worldwide.

Via Cathryn Wellner
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Leonardo Mino from WHY IT MATTERS: Digital Transformation
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6 Ways Autonomous Cars Could Change Everything via @fastcompany

6 Ways Autonomous Cars Could Change Everything via @fastcompany | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it

Autonomous cars could also have all sorts of unanticipated effects, like reversing urbanization and putting an end to parking.


Via Farid Mheir
more...
Farid Mheir's curator insight, October 19, 2014 9:06 AM
Reverse urbanization, end of parking are some of the ways autonomous cars may change our lives. What would the impact on business be? Continuous delivery, where delivery vans make delivery routes 24-7?Predictive support, where support personnel are dispatched throughout an area where their service may be needed in the future, working in the car in between jobs?Warehouse on wheels, with high velocity items made available for order online and delivery in minutes?Travelling office, where sales team work out of small vans as they travel from one client to the next?
Mark Muller's curator insight, October 19, 2014 7:26 PM

I think autonomous (self-driving) cars will be the next major revolution in real estate. An autonomous campervan or bus could easile be converted into a mobile office or retail shop, eliminating the need for leasing a fixed tenancy.

 

Imagine a small office could be totally run from a moving bus, even picking up employees from home or train stations and transporting them to meetings as others work inside.

 

Maybe future landlords will lease both fixed and mobile property? 

Rescooped by Leonardo Mino from WHY IT MATTERS: Digital Transformation
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Barcelona has defined a "city OS" to coordinate its digital communication network

Barcelona has defined a "city OS" to coordinate its digital communication network | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it

Via Farid Mheir
more...
Farid Mheir's curator insight, October 25, 2014 4:50 PM

Truly inspiring to see that Barcelona has established an "operating system" for the city (city OS) that connects all of the sensors (street lights, parking meters, cameras, etc.) to make their data accessible for different applications and analytics opportunities.


Rescooped by Leonardo Mino from WHY IT MATTERS: Digital Transformation
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Big data and big agriculture via @gigaom

Big data and big agriculture via @gigaom | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it
As the global population increases, weather volatility grows, and fuel prices surge, there will be more incentives to use data and analytics on the farm to increase yields and minimize risks.

Via Farid Mheir
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Farid Mheir's curator insight, October 31, 2014 10:15 PM

great insight that shows how much digital permeates every field (pun intended ;-)

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Two Useful iPad Apps to Create Classroom Posters ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Two Useful iPad Apps to Create Classroom Posters ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it
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How Ebola sped out of control

How Ebola sped out of control | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it
The story behind the failure of the world's health organizations to stop the Ebola disaster.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, January 12, 2015 10:18 AM

The development between MDCs and LDCs are very different in a lot of ways. The Ebola epidemic is handled in two different ways because of the levels of development in countries. in MDCs there is more of a health indutry and can cure sicknesses much faster than those countries of less development. 

I.C.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2015 2:29 PM

It was sad that it took over 4 months for there to be declared an epidemic.  I think if this hit in the US or Europe then things would have been taken care of a lot faster.  Out of sight, out of mind till one trickled in then another.  Then we got scared.  But Africa needs to get it together and create a better continent with healthcare systems that work.  The doctors over there said it looked medieval.  I believe that and can't even fathom how horrible it was.  

Molly McComb's curator insight, May 27, 2015 11:11 AM

Talking about the failure of WHO to stop the Ebola outbreak and how the low developed countries were so quickly affected by the disease. 

 

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Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country

Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it
A new analysis of sea levels and flood risk around the world offers more evidence that the brunt of climate change will not be borne equally.


More than a quarter of Vietnam’s residents live in areas likely to be subject to regular floods by the end of the century.  Globally, eight of the 10 large countries most at risk are in Asia.  These figures are the result of a new analysis of sea levels and flood risk around the world, conducted by Climate Central and based on more detailed sea-level data than has previously been available.  The analysis offers more evidence that the countries emitting the most carbon aren’t necessarily the ones that will bear the brunt of climate change.  


Tags: Southeast Asia, water, disasters, urban ecology, coastal, climate change. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 15, 2014 5:14 PM

In this article the author discusses the risk of flooding in many different locations of the world. He claims about 2.6 percent of the world's populations. That's a big percentage considering all the people of the planet. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 14, 2015 12:10 PM

Flooding is a major risk when it comes to the world we live in especially for Southeast Asia, some areas will be below sea level which shows how the the climate changes are affecting the flood risks caused by global carbon emission. A study from this article shows that eight our of ten of the largest countries will be at the risk of being flooded and below sea level. The major question is how can this carbon emissions be lower? If the carbon is lower then the sea level will rise and less countries will be at risk, this is mainly focusing on Southeast Asia. Yes, we can not change the climate changes but by keeping the land clean and taking care of the environment the flood risk and sea level change could get out of risk level. 

If the weather continues at the rate it is at then about 2.6 percent of the global population which is approximately 177 million people will be living in a place at risk of regular flooding. Flooding can cause a lot of damage to homes, crops and people physically because flooding is not just a little amount of water.

The largest country at risk with people in danger from the map is China, I liked the way this map worked because you can see from the boxes how many people are going to be affected by the flooding. Instead of just having numbers, giving a better visual for people with the boxes and their sizes.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 9:24 PM

It's like watching the land on Earth change right in front of our eyes.  According to this map, if global carbon emissions stay as they currently are and sea levels can be affected about as much as expected, 2.6 million people of the global population will live in a high risk flood zone; this wipes out 177 million people!  

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How Ebola sped out of control

How Ebola sped out of control | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it
The story behind the failure of the world's health organizations to stop the Ebola disaster.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, January 12, 2015 10:18 AM

The development between MDCs and LDCs are very different in a lot of ways. The Ebola epidemic is handled in two different ways because of the levels of development in countries. in MDCs there is more of a health indutry and can cure sicknesses much faster than those countries of less development. 

I.C.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2015 2:29 PM

It was sad that it took over 4 months for there to be declared an epidemic.  I think if this hit in the US or Europe then things would have been taken care of a lot faster.  Out of sight, out of mind till one trickled in then another.  Then we got scared.  But Africa needs to get it together and create a better continent with healthcare systems that work.  The doctors over there said it looked medieval.  I believe that and can't even fathom how horrible it was.  

Molly McComb's curator insight, May 27, 2015 11:11 AM

Talking about the failure of WHO to stop the Ebola outbreak and how the low developed countries were so quickly affected by the disease. 

 

Rescooped by Leonardo Mino from Geography Education
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Why this Ebola outbreak became the worst we've ever seen

"The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more people than sum total of all the previous outbreaks since the virus was first identified in 1976. This video explains how it got so bad."  


Via Seth Dixon
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John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, October 28, 2014 10:20 PM

In just a few months the Ebola virus has cumulated out of control. More people became affected and died in the last five months than all of the combined deaths that have occurred since Ebola was first discovered in 1976. Ebola began to spread from rural areas to a border region in West Africa when ill people traveled to the city to work or go to the market, making international spread likely. Mounting a campaign to increase awareness of the risks and to contain the virus was nearly impossible due to the low illiteracy rates. Consequently, health workers were taking ill people away from family and their homes to contaminate centers. This caused much fear and mistrust and was not successful. More people became infected and the snowball effect ensued. When people did show up at ill-equipped hospitals, there were not enough beds or free space and most were turned away. Some health workers walked off the job fearing being infected because of the poor conditions. No gloves, masks or gowns were provided and workers feared for their own health. The ill patients went back into the community and Ebola continued to spread. The response of the global community was not fast enough, and help did not arrive in time before the spread of Ebola became an epidemic. It is clear that in a world that is so closely connected, we must have a global heath system that works.  

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 4, 2014 5:32 PM

Ebola is getting worst every day. one of the things that has caused the spread of this virus is the fact that many working people cross the border to other regions to work or to go to market. Back in days, you used to see this Ebola issue in very rural areas, but now is getting worst. In these areas were the Ebola is getting worst, they do not count with a good health system. Sometimes there are day when they do not have gloves, gowns and mask, and because of that, there have been health care workers who have just walked away from their jobs because they do not want to put in risk their life. This  is a very sad situation, which I hope it get better.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 13, 2015 10:41 PM

Geography played an important role in spreading this disease like wild fires. In a rural place such as Liberia where there is low literacy rates and  limited knowledge of Ebola, it can be spread without people knowing what is happening. On top of that there are workers crossing the border everyday for work and exposing it to everyone around them. This even took place in west Africa where Ebola breakout are unheard of. All these contributing factor led to the worst epidemic of the century. 

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Fire and Weather

"This is what a pyrocumulus cloud caused by the burning of over 28,000+ acres of forest looked like as the sun set.  In person as these clouds were changing it wasn't all that noticeable when the huge plumes of smoke changed shape, but thanks to the magic of a time-lapse we get to behold the violent nature of the smoke cloud, including a storm cloud that emerged behind the main pyrocumulus."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 23, 2014 1:02 PM

Seeing this fire essential create it's own weather system is riveting.  While this scene can be seen as beautiful on the macro-scale, it is horrific on the ground where the fire ravaged physical and human landscapes alike.  Here is some satellite imagery of the fire. 

 

Tagsdisasters,  weather and climateCalifornia, landscape, time lapsevideo.

Diane Johnson's curator insight, September 24, 2014 7:10 PM

Great application of key factors involved in weather systems.

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A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates

A World With 11 Billion People? New Population Projections Shatter Earlier Estimates | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it

"In a paper published Thursday in Science, demographers from several universities and the United Nations Population Division conclude that instead of leveling off in the second half of the 21st century, as the UN predicted less than a decade ago, the world's population will continue to grow beyond 2100."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:23 AM

It is interesting to see the demographic transition model in real life effect. As time passes, underdeveloped countries will enter stage 3 of the demographic transition model and see a decline in birth rate and death rate remains relatively low. Most developing countries now will enter the very end of stage 3 and even stage 4 as birth rates balance of death rates. The real question is whether or not Earth will be able to sustain 11 billion people. It is scary to see the world in a rapid population boom. This population growth relates to the agricultural unit in that the use of GMO's is to accommodate the rapidly growing populations in the world.

Aaron Burnette's curator insight, September 8, 2015 9:25 AM

The population was originally predicted to level off in the next half century, but this is not the case by a long-shot, as predicted by the UN.

AHS Model UN's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:12 PM

These articles from the Guardian and National Geographic were the first I'd heard of the new population projections for the future.  For many years it was assumed that the global population would level out at around 9 billion; while that is still within the range of possibilities but these new projections indicate that it is much more likely that the total global population will be much higher than that.  The geographic implications of this are far reaching.   

 

Tag: population, demographic transition model, unit 2 population.

Rescooped by Leonardo Mino from Geography Education
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Natural gas leaking from faulty wells, not fracked shale

Natural gas leaking from faulty wells, not fracked shale | Sustainable Urbanism | Scoop.it

"A new study adds to growing evidence that the risk of fracking contaminating drinking water wells is to due to problems with the lining of the gas wells, not the high-pressure fracturing of deep shale to release natural gas. In a new study, scientists examined isotopes of helium and two other noble gases to identify the source of methane found in drinking water wells in the Marcellus Shale of Pennsylvania and the Barnett Shale of Texas, areas where a lot of fracking has taken place. The pattern of isotopes suggested that the stray gas had leaked out of the well casing near the surface, rather than escaping from the fracked deep shale, according to a story in The Dallas Morning News. The findings will be published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences."

 

Tags: energy, pollution, resources, environment, environment modify, ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
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