sustainable education
3 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Kate Makin
Scoop.it!

Google+ Conversation with Al Gore about Combating Climate Change

Seven years ago former Vice President Al Gore released An Inconvenient Truth, kick-starting a global conversation about climate change (available on Google P...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kate Makin from Sustain Our Earth
Scoop.it!

Alaska sinks as climate change thaws permafrost

Alaska sinks as climate change thaws permafrost | sustainable education | Scoop.it

The nation's last frontier is — in many ways — its ground zero for climate change. Alaska's temperatures are rising twice as fast as those in the lower 48, prompting more sea ice to disappear in summer. While this may eventually open the Northwest Passage to sought-after tourism, oil exploration and trade, it also spells trouble as wildfires increase, roads buckle and tribal villages sink into the sea.


Via SustainOurEarth
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kate Makin from Organic Farming
Scoop.it!

Bees

Bees cram a lot of life into 40 days, more than many people do in 40 years.
The newborn have duties cleaning cells, including that from which each emerges, then stocking them some with honey and pollen (separately) capping the cells with propolis. Other cells contain eggs laid by the queen, which hatch as larvae which these junior bees feed.
The preparation of honey for the hive involves complexification and reducing of water content, a big part of this process achieved by deep kissing, so to speak, the transferance of honey from one bee's digestive tract to others in turn.
I expect that this process is fundamental both to the health benefits of honey and also to the risk of hive collapse if some aberrant organism or molecule gets into the collective guts.
The practice in large scale commercial honey production of heating pipes through which honey is asked to flow may kill off a lot of the health value. So local, unprocessed honey inherently is more likely to have health value. How thickly you have to dollop it on/in to matched the highly regarded Manuka honey is unknown. Note that Manuka honey is obtained by bees foraging this teatree's flowers:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leptospermum_scoparium
... so source of honey and pollen will affect honey's health value, surely.
I once kept a pollen trap on a suburban hive for a couple of days when the honey run was at its peak. This is essentially a boot scraper at the door, to take of the cluster of pollen, see yellow blobs here:
http://www.nichedevelopment.com/bees/images/bee_22.jpg
During that period the pollen was remarkably diverse in colour and taste: dull earthy flavours from clover and other legumes; pale lemony-white from citrus, delicious; wondrous dark red wine coloured pollen from roses, with deep rich flavour.
As bees grow up their duties go closer to the door, where they add dancing to kissing in their social repertoire, increasing the lacework of communication, learning to navigate. And they begin to use their wings, fanning the hive for humidity reduction and cooling, as well as strengthening for guard duties near the door. There are a lot of predators who would like to get into the hive, from other bees to ants to Pooh and other bears.
And so, in last days, eventually out on the range, they fly to scout for nectar and pollen further away rather then immediately around, to suck the nectar up while getting the pollen attached to socks, staying with one species one trip. Finding way home, deep kissing the load away while others massage their feet, then providing a report to others of where they have been.
An organic farm inspector once suggested to me that the risk of chemical pollution of hives was reduced by the fact that poisoned bees were unlikely to make it home. I wonder if research needs to concentrate on the less toxic, the more clever substances being used out there on plants or in plants, which have slower impacts and which may really only explode in the hive world of unsafe sucks.
Bees are pretty clever. But not all that clever. They perhaps did not realise that people could count until the research was shoved under their proboscises. See

http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/intuitive-knowledge.shtml

Experiments with bees show the same sort of understanding of numbers and intentions. An experimenter set out dishes of honey in a sequence, doubling the distance each time. After the first three dishes had been found by scouts, the bees showed up at the fourth location before the honey arrived, extrapolating from the experimenter's previous behavior and inferring his intentions.

Via Giri Kumar
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Makin
Scoop.it!

Scottish islands say ‘we want to control destiny’

Scottish islands say ‘we want to control destiny’ | sustainable education | Scoop.it
SCOTLAND’S largest island groups have written to the UK and Scottish governments demanding more powers for their communities to protect their culture and make the most of renewable resources.
more...
Jim Arnott's curator insight, July 18, 2013 4:58 PM

Vote Yes in the 2014 Referendum on independence for Scotland.

Scooped by Kate Makin
Scoop.it!

Award-winning Ugandan veterinarian to speak about 'Saving Gorillas by Saving ... - Colorado State University News (press release)

Award-winning Ugandan veterinarian to speak about 'Saving Gorillas by Saving ... - Colorado State University News (press release) | sustainable education | Scoop.it
Colorado State University News (press release)
Award-winning Ugandan veterinarian to speak about 'Saving Gorillas by Saving ...
Kate Makin's insight:

Steps toward a friendlier future

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Makin
Scoop.it!

Solar Water Desalination (Alpha Minds)

Solar Water Desalination (Alpha Minds) | sustainable education | Scoop.it
Read at : http://www.minds.com/blog/view/35935/solar-water-distiller-enables-desalination-anywhere-there039s-sunlight-and-saltwater Solar Water Distiller Enables Desalination Anywhere There's Sunli...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kate Makin from MOVIES VIDEOS & PICS
Scoop.it!

Who Killed The Honey Bee? (BBC Documentary)

Bees are dying in their millions. It is an ecological crisis that threatens to bring global agriculture to a standstill. Introduced by Martha Kearney, this d...

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kate Makin from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Turning algae into biofuel: A one minute method for biocrude

Converting algae to biofuel could be a sustainable solution to the need for liquid fuel in the United States, according to U-M researchers. Scientists in the chemical engineering department are working to create an effective method for converting the plant, which can be harvested continuously and grown in any water condition.

 

Phil Savage (http://che.engin.umich.edu/people/savage.html) is the Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Chemical Engineering (http://che.engin.umich.edu/) at the University of Michigan. His research focus is on energy production from renewable resources, developing novel processes for converting biomass hydrogen, methane, and liquid transportation fuels.

 

Savage's ocean-going organism of choice is the green marine micro-alga of the genus Nannochloropsis. To make their one-minute biocrude, Savage and Julia Faeth, a doctoral student in Savage's lab, filled a steel pipe connector with 1.5 milliliters of wet algae, capped it and plunged it into 1,100-degree Fahrenheit sand. The small volume ensured that the algae was heated through, but with only a minute to warm up, the algae's temperature should have just grazed the 550-degree mark before the team pulled the reactor back out. Previously, Savage and his team heated the algae for times ranging from 10 to 90 minutes. They saw their best results, with about half of the algae converted to biocrude, after treating it for 10 to 40 minutes at 570 degrees.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Makin
Scoop.it!

Mukherjee calls for rural growth strategy to reduce poverty, trigger development - NetIndian

Mukherjee calls for rural growth strategy to reduce poverty, trigger development - NetIndian | sustainable education | Scoop.it
Mukherjee calls for rural growth strategy to reduce poverty, trigger development NetIndian "Technology has to be the vehicle to bridge distances - not only in terms of geography, but also progress and development," he said in his inaugural address...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Makin
Scoop.it!

Celebrating 125 Years of National Geographic Magazine - Forbes

Celebrating 125 Years of National Geographic Magazine - Forbes | sustainable education | Scoop.it
Celebrating 125 Years of National Geographic Magazine
Forbes
The findings and images they brought back have educated us, inspired us, and helped us change the world.
Kate Makin's insight:

National Geographic is an amazing resource for the classroom

more...
No comment yet.