Sustainable Business
29 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

Boots 'quietly getting on with' improving impact of Botanics range

Boots 'quietly getting on with' improving impact of Botanics range | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
High street health and beauty store reduces the sustainability impact of its largest skincare range by 32%
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

So, business leaders do think climate change is important after all, says flash poll

So, business leaders do think climate change is important after all, says flash poll | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
A flash poll carried out by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) of over 2,000 senior business executives across the world challenges the stereotype that business is complacent about climate change.

Just under half (46%) of respondents to the poll said that the effects of climate change call for urgent and immediate action by leaders in government, business and civil society.

“Companies will almost certainly be affected by climate change in one way or another"

“The poll comes at a time of heightened awareness of the effects of climate change. An unusual number of extreme weather events across the globe in early 2014 – including a heatwave in Australia, unusually cold weather in the eastern US and severe storms in Europe – may be interlinked, according to the UN's World Meteorological Organisation,” said the EIU.
“And business leaders' call for action may also have been influenced by a recent report by the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which warns that the world is ill-prepared for the risks from a changing climate.
“Companies will almost certainly be affected by climate change in one way or another. The risks involved include the breakdown of infrastructure networks, food systems and water ecosystems, for example.”
Emerging economies are particularly vulnerable to climate change, a point highlighted in the IPCC report. And that might explain why, in the EIU survey, emerging-market business leaders (from Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Latin America) are far more insistent on action to combat climate change than their peers in Europe and North America.
“The degree of divergence between rich and developing-world attitudes is striking, and suggests a significant degree of scepticism remains among developed-world businesses that climate change is a priority global issue,” it says.
Overall, however, the largest share of surveyed executives appears to be lending its voice to the call for action. This is consistent with other business-led initiatives on climate change taking shape in different parts of the world, such as the Prince of Wales’s Corporate Leaders Group (CLG) of major UK and European corporate leaders, which recently issued a communiqué warning that “significant changes must be introduced to the global economy, or the risks of disruptive climate impacts will grow increasingly serious”.
Meanwhile, 70 major global companies have signed the CLG’s Trillion Tonne Communiqué, calling for a timeline for achieving net zero emissions, which would keep cumulative emissions from human-caused CO2 below one trillion tonnes of carbon.
Energy giant Shell is among the signatories to the communiqué. However, in the EIU flash poll, only 39% of business leaders from the energy and natural resources sector demand urgent action on climate change, compared with 67% in logistics and distribution – the sector with the highest share of executives calling for immediate action.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

How can the value of nature be embedded in the world of business?

How can the value of nature be embedded in the world of business? | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
Natural capital isn't about putting a cash value on a Siberian tiger or a mangrove forest; it's about business risks and costs
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

Travel Foundation: sustainable tourism will soon be 'the only way to do business' - Blue and Green Tomorrow

Travel Foundation: sustainable tourism will soon be 'the only way to do business' - Blue and Green Tomorrow | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
Ahead of the eighth Responsible Tourism in Destinations (RTD8) conference in Manchester next week, the Travel Foundation's acting chief executive Salli Fel
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

Why the act of giving will get you a long way in business

Why the act of giving will get you a long way in business | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
Wharton professor, Adam Grant, talks about why those who give are happier and will be the winners of the corporate world
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

The battle for big business: climate change vs carbon-cutting policy | Trillion Fund

The battle for big business: climate change vs carbon-cutting policy | Trillion Fund | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
Most big business feels distinctly uncomfortable about climate change. Recognising internally - if not admitting publicly - the threat that the reality of man-made global warming poses to the foundations of the energy-dependent global stock markets, most large corporations choose to oppose policies designed to mitigate the damage.
We are seeing this play out in the UK as captains of energy intensive industries bemoan carbon taxes and green subsidies, using the threat of job losses as their clout to get politicians to cave in to their demands.
It is no exaggeration to say that big business, particularly big energy business - dependent as it is on the continued extraction and distribution of fossil fuels, has been deliberately subverting the growth of clean, fundamentally cheap renewable energy (that they cannot profit from) with smear campaigns: to politicians, the media and the public. It is "expensive". Green subsidies "punish the working classes". Renewable energy is
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

Boeing: sustainability is ‘the right thing to do for business’ - Blue and Green Tomorrow

Boeing: sustainability is ‘the right thing to do for business’ - Blue and Green Tomorrow | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
The leading aircraft manufacturer talks energy efficiency, ‘green diesel’ and reducing aviation emissions. This article originally appeared in Blue &a
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

Apple's Climate Stance Signals Hope for Brave New World

Apple's Climate Stance Signals Hope for Brave New World | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
These days, it is the company that fails to guard itself against climate change risk that is destined to find itself on the losing end of market share. For a company like Apple, risk associated with climate change comes in many forms....
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

What radical, crazy-sounding ideas did Ben & Jerry’s make work?

What radical, crazy-sounding ideas did Ben & Jerry’s make work? | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
There's more to Ben and Jerry's than unusual flavors and fairly traded sugar cane - the company has strived for 'linked prosperity' - the idea that success should be shared with all its stakeholders.

Fans of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream are passionate about its unusual flavors with unusual names, like Cherry Garcia and Americone Dream. But there is more to Ben & Jerry’s than fairly traded cane sugar and cream from small family farms. The company has struggled valiantly for 35 years to live up to a vision its employees call “linked prosperity.” This is the simple but radical idea that the owners of the company should share their success with all of their stakeholders — everybody – including employees, suppliers, distributors, customers, cows, and even the people who own stock in the company.
In the 1980s, co-founder Ben Cohen and a fellow board member, Jeff Furman, pushed Ben & Jerry’s to set a course that a generation of socially responsible entrepreneurs would follow. In 1991, Ben & Jerry’s was probably the first publicly traded American company to offer health and other benefits to same-sex partners of employees. It was also the first American company to produce a transparent audit of the impacts it had on society, both positive and negative. It took unusually aggressive steps to limit its environmental impact, and its charitable giving was four times higher than the average for US corporations. In this excerpt from the first chapter of Ice Cream Social: The Struggle for the Soul of Ben & Jerry’s, journalist Brad Edmondson explains.
Ben & Jerry’s took radical, crazy-sounding ideas and proved they could work. They showed that optimizing a business for linked prosperity is fun when you’re doing it right, and that this approach creates amazingly loyal suppliers, employees, and customers. Their efforts made it easier for the socially conscious entrepreneurs who followed them. But breaking these trails wasn’t easy.

Ben Cohen’s public image is that of a happy-go-lucky hippie, but he is actually a shrewd businessman who is capable of driving a hard bargain.

The company has a three-part mission statement, and the three parts are equal and interrelated. It wants to make the world’s best ice cream, to pursue progressive social change, and to provide fair compensation to employees and shareholders alike. Ben & Jerry’s stuck to these principles as it became an international brand. But the company eventually grew beyond the managerial abilities of its board, and after years of struggling, they were forced to sell to Unilever, the world’s second-largest food company. Co-founder Ben Cohen walked away from the deal with $41 million, and Jerry Greenfield got $9.5 million. Yet both of them have also said that losing control of their company was one of the worst experiences of their lives, and they still don’t want to talk about it.
The three-part mission did survive the sale, however. The founders and the board accepted Unilever’s offer only after negotiating a detailed agreement that guaranteed them a continuing role in the company and gave them legally enforceable powers.
Under the agreement, Ben & Jerry’s continues to exist as a corporation chartered in Vermont. But it is a “close corporation.” Howard Fuguet, the company’s lawyer during the negotiations, defines this legal term as “basically a corporation that has only one stockholder. And in the case of Ben & Jerry’s, the stockholder grants certain powers to the board. One of the board’s powers is to appoint new members without the shareholder’s approval. This means that the shareholder can never fire the board.” These non-Unilever directors control nine of the board’s eleven seats.

The guiding principles of the contract are set out in a four-page Shareholders Agreement and parts of a sixty-five-page Agreement and Plan of Merger, along with several attachments. They are public documents, on file and available through the federal Securities and Exchange Commission, and fourteen years after the sale, they are still in use. The agreements exist in perpetuity, which means they won’t ever expire. And this is the crucial difference between Ben & Jerry’s and other socially responsible businesses that sold themselves to multinational corporations. The folks in Vermont aren’t going anywhere.
The sale agreements give the Ben & Jerry’s board of directors primary responsibility for “preserving and enhancing the objectives of the historical social mission of the company as they may evolve,” and for “safeguarding the integrity of the essential elements of the brand.” Unilever has primary responsibility for the financial and operational aspects of the business, and it also retains all powers not expressly given to the board.
“The idea was to follow the historical pattern of the three-part mission,” says Howard Fuguet. The agreements captured the tension that had always existed between the product quality, economic, and social parts of Ben & Jerry’s and set up a system of checks and balances so the three parts could keep moving forward together. “The important thing, historically, was that no part of the mission should be more important than any other part,” he said. “They are supposed to be equal.”
The sale agreements also describe the job of the CEO in detail. They require the board of Ben & Jerry’s to agree with Unilever on an annual business plan and delegation of authority to the CEO, with Unilever having the final decision on both counts. They also allow Unilever to hire and fire the CEO after “good faith consultation” with the board. But the board has the express power to prevent the CEO from changing product standards, introducing new products, or changing marketing materials or any use of the Ben & Jerry’s trademark. Some of the CEO’s compensation is pegged to the company’s social performance, and this part of the compensation package is decided by the board of Ben & Jerry’s.
The agreements require Unilever to pay a “living wage” to all Ben & Jerry’s employees, based on local calculations of the cost of what the board calls “a decent life.” The agreements also require Unilever to contribute $1.1 million a year to the Ben & Jerry’s Foundation, plus adjustments to ensure that its contribution will increase in step with inflation and increased sales. They require Unilever to fund an independently audited annual report of Ben & Jerry’s social performance, and they call upon Unilever to develop its own system of social assessments.

"And after we signed the deal, Jerry and his wife asked my wife and me to come to their house for dinner."

These points were negotiated in marathon sessions between Ben Cohen and Richard Goldstein, the chief of Unilever’s North American operations. “It was by far the most unique deal I have ever been involved in,” said Goldstein, who negotiated dozens of acquisitions for Unilever. “When we were getting toward the end of it, Ben used to call me at home at all hours. My wife would answer the phone and he’d say ‘Yo, it’s Ben.’ She’d say, ‘Ben, he’s traveling. I’m going back to sleep.’ And after we signed the deal, Jerry and his wife asked my wife and me to come to their house for dinner. I can’t remember ever doing something like that. I was flattered.”
Ben Cohen’s public image is that of a happy-go-lucky hippie, but he is actually a shrewd businessman who is capable of driving a hard bargain. He negotiated the sale agreements under incredible pressure, as a bidding war for the company heated up, lawsuits were filed, and friendships were frayed. “He was disciplined,” said Pierre Ferrari, another board member who went through the sale. “He pushed the process. The sale agreements have precise numbers in them. That was Ben.”
Cohen is also a perfectionist. After the sale, he left the board of directors and never returned, citing irreconcilable differences with Unilever. Today he and Jerry are paid to represent the brand, but he keeps his distance from the company and has, at times, been sharply critical of Ben & Jerry’s multinational parent. But his old partner in the social mission, Jeff Furman, stayed on. Jeff is currently Chair of the Board of Ben & Jerry’s.
The story of the company’s endless pursuit of linked prosperity offers answers to the questions Ben and Jeff first posted in the 1980s: What would the world look like if businesses got serious about pursuing social and environmental justice? What if a business was directed toward several equally important goals, with profit being only one of them? And what would happen if social justice activists controlled the boards of directors of a large, global enterprise? Could that work?
There’s a second, related question. It’s the question of legacy. Thousands of business owners do value their employees, the natural environment, and the community at least as highly as their own bank accounts. But investing in these areas rarely produces an immediate financial return, and many investors see social investments as unnecessary costs. So how can socially responsible businesses retain their progressive values after the founding generations retire? Or, to put it another way, how can someone give up control of a successful enterprise without throwing away its purpose?
Jeff Furman doesn’t know the answers to these questions, and, like Ben, he would also prefer that Unilever did not own Ben & Jerry’s. He stayed to protect the vision of linked prosperity and pass it on to the next generation. And, he says, he knows that the struggle to reconcile profit making with social justice will never end. At Ben & Jerry’s, however, the struggle has a permanent seat in the boardroom.
Brad Edmondson regularly posts new material about Ben & Jerry’s at the site www.icecreamsocialbook.com.
Click here for a chance to win a copy of Ice Cream Social.
zlc energy ltd's insight:

Wow, those guys are truly inspiring!

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

Our Mission

For every item purchased, we donate $7 to this weeks charity. Sevenly is a social good platform for helping charities raise funding and social awareness to aid in today's pressing issues.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

Meet The First Carbon-Neutral Hotel Group In The World, And Why Your Business Should Take Notice

Meet The First Carbon-Neutral Hotel Group In The World, And Why Your Business Should Take Notice | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
In an interview with Kirsten Brøchner of the Arthur Hotel Group in Copenhagen, Denmark, we discussed their journey to become the first carbon-neutral hotel group in the world, and how their 5-point climate action plan is not only good for the planet, but good for business. Rahim Kanani: Tell me a little bit about [...]
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

Why business needs to wake up to water waste - Carbon Trust

Why business needs to wake up to water waste - Carbon Trust | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
Business water use: Carbon Trust Chief Executive, Tom Delay, discusses progress that needs to be made by businesses to address water scarcity
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

Sustainability inside - Carbon Trust

Sustainability inside - Carbon Trust | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
Sustainable business: Put sustainability inside your business to become more resilient, cut costs and grow revenues.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

Industrial renewable heat - Carbon Trust

Industrial renewable heat - Carbon Trust | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
What are the opportunities for renewable heat technology in industry? Analysis of renewable heat in five main industrial sectors, and opportunities for its use
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

How can the value of nature be embedded in the world of business?

How can the value of nature be embedded in the world of business? | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
Natural capital isn't about putting a cash value on a Siberian tiger or a mangrove forest; it's about business risks and costs
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

Ethical consumer market now worth £54bn in the UK – up 12% in 2012 - Blue and Green Tomorrow

Ethical consumer market now worth £54bn in the UK – up 12% in 2012 - Blue and Green Tomorrow | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
The ethical consumer market, most notably the food and drink sector, grew by more than 12% in 2012 despite the global recession, according to findings by E
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

M&S among four UK firms named on world’s 'most ethical' companies list - Blue and Green Tomorrow

M&S among four UK firms named on world’s 'most ethical' companies list - Blue and Green Tomorrow | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
Marks & Spencer is among four UK firms named on the annual World’s Most Ethical (WME) companies list, published by the Ethisphere Institute thinktank
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

Understanding desire: how brands can respond to what people want - Blue and Green Tomorrow

Understanding desire: how brands can respond to what people want - Blue and Green Tomorrow | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
With the launch of her book, Anna Simpson proposes a new role for brands: not manufacturing desire through clever campaigns, but responding to it with inte
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

Jenna Voigt : The long-term investment theme that analysts are overlooking

Jenna Voigt : The long-term investment theme that analysts are overlooking | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
Alliance Trust’s Peter Michaelis explains why you cannot afford to turn a blind eye to the importance of sustainable business models.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

Ownership Day: age of ‘invisible investors’ passing - Blue and Green Tomorrow

Ownership Day: age of ‘invisible investors’ passing - Blue and Green Tomorrow | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
Pension funds have been urged to “lead from the front” and hold companies to account. To mark the second annual Ownership Day, institutional investors
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

TripAdvisor extends initiative to showcase green hotels

TripAdvisor extends initiative to showcase green hotels | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
Travel website, TripAdvisor, is to extend its GreenLeaders programme - which highlights hotels that are engaging in environmentally-friendly practices - into Europe.

GreenLeaders was developed in consultation with the UK Green Building Council, as well as the Carbon Trust, the United Nations Environment Programme and the International Tourism Partnership, who advised on what hotels could do to make their buildings and operations more environmentally friendly.
The programme, which up until now was offered only in the US, awards qualifying hotels and B&Bs with TripAdvisor GreenLeaders status, based on the green practices the property has in place – with properties tiered between Bronze, Silver, Gold or Platinum awards. Each award will be shown on the property’s listing on TripAdvisor.
For the first time, hotels and B&Bs in 19 markets, including UK and Ireland, Germany, France, Italy and Spain, are able to apply for TripAdvisor GreenLeaders status.
Eligible accommodation businesses will be assessed against a holistic set of environmental criteria, including practices ranging from linen and towel re-use, recycling and composting through to solar panels, electric car charging stations and green roofing. The more green practices a hotel or B&B has in place, the higher the TripAdvisor GreenLeaders level it can achieve.
According to a recent TripBarometer traveller survey by TripAdvisor, 81% of travellers place importance on properties implementing eco-friendly practices, and 85% of UK hoteliers indicate that they currently have green practices in place.
Jenny Rushmore, director of responsible travel at TripAdvisor, said: “With so many travellers placing an importance on the eco-friendly practices of the places they visit, accommodation owners stand to gain a real competitive edge by promoting their environmentally friendly practices. Our TripAdvisor GreenLeaders programme will enable businesses managing their environmental footprint to highlight their commitment to millions of travellers around the world, at no expense to their business.”
John Alker, director of policy and communications at UK-GBC, said: “For the hotel and leisure sector, going green is not only the right thing to do, it’s just good business. Green should be viewed as another aspect of quality. The GreenLeaders programme will help consumers – and indeed investors – understand who is taking this seriously.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

Sainsbury’s shrinks toilet roll packaging by 12mm and takes 500 lorries off the road

Sainsbury’s shrinks toilet roll packaging by 12mm and takes 500 lorries off the road | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
Sainsbury's has become the first supermarket to reduce the amount of cardboard used in its own-brand toilet rolls in a bid to cut carbon emissions.

The retailer has shrunk the diameter of the inner cardboard tube on every roll by 12mm, cutting the number of delivery lorries required by 500 a year, the equivalent of 140,000 kg of CO2.
The paper in Sainsbury's toilet rolls has been 100% FSC certified for many years and the cardboard tube has also been certified since September 2011.
As part of its 20 by 20 Sustainability Plan, Sainsbury's is committed to making sure that its own packaging has been reduced by half compared to 2005 and this latest initiative will help deliver this, it says. New packaging designs on Sainsbury's own brand products has generated an 11% reduction in the last two years.
New on pack information will also help shoppers make more sustainable purchasing decisions, by reassuring customers that it is the same number of sheets and the same quality in each roll, but that it will now use less packaging, take lorries off the road and save the consumer space at home.
Fiona Miall, toilet roll buyer for Sainsbury's said: "We are always looking for new ways to make small changes to our business that can help our customers make more sustainable choices. Our scale means that by making what seems like a relatively small packaging development, we're able to make significant carbon savings.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

Ethical retailer of the week: Green and Black’s - Blue and Green Tomorrow

Ethical retailer of the week: Green and Black’s - Blue and Green Tomorrow | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
Green and Black’s produces chocolate products, using organic and Fairtrade ingredients, and has a strong focus on ethics. The company was set up as a sm
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

waste & recycling news - Will.i.am: on plastic, waste and becoming obsolete

waste & recycling news - Will.i.am: on plastic, waste and becoming obsolete | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by zlc energy ltd
Scoop.it!

Carbon Trust calls for businesses to adapt or die - Carbon Trust

Carbon Trust calls for businesses to adapt or die - Carbon Trust | Sustainable Business | Scoop.it
New report urges businesses to prioritise resource efficiency or risk getting left behind
more...
No comment yet.