Sustainability Science
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Sustainability Science
How might we keep the lights on, water flowing, and natural world vaguely intact? It starts with grabbing innovative ideas/examples to help kick down our limits and inspire a more sustainable world. We implement with rigorous science backed by hard data.
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China has climate change deniers, too. But they’re mostly shunned.

China has climate change deniers, too. But they’re mostly shunned. | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
Unlike in America, climate change skepticism in China is largely a left-wing notion.
PIRatE Lab's insight:
US President-elect Donald Trump sees climate change, according to his incoming chief of staff, as a "bunch of bunk." But China — the biggest carbon dioxide emitter on Earth — takes the topic very seriously. And state-run papers in the country are already crowing that the US under Trump will “betray its words” on climate change, while "China will unswervingly keep its promise.”
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What China's successful reforestation program means for the rest of the world

What China's successful reforestation program means for the rest of the world | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
China is growing a lot of trees: Here's why that news might not be as great you might think
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China to end one-child policy

China to end one-child policy | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it

"All couples will now be allowed to have two children, the state-run news agency said, citing a statement from the Communist Party. The controversial policy was introduced nationally in 1979, to reduce the country's birth rate and slow the population growth rate. However, concerns at China's aging population led to pressure for change."


Via Seth Dixon
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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 24, 2015 6:58 AM

Chinas change in policy can be directly attributed to the need of unskilled labor. China has become an economic superpower, by exploiting its vast resources of labor. For decades, China has had a vast reservoir of cheap labor to rely on. In recent years, that vast reservoir has begun to run dry. This new phenomenon can be traced to the governments one child policy.  The lack of multiple new births has lead to an older population. An older population can provide the type of manual labor, that China needs to compete in the global market. The government  hopes to revesre the aging trend by ending this policy. If successful, China would likely see another era of great growth within its economy.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:37 PM

Lets not forget the expansion of china also with its economic strength and its military strength which is a threat to other countries in the area because china can take control and with Chinese moving into Africa and United states as residents china is going to need to populate its own country.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:55 PM

First implemented in 1979 and diminished in 2013 It is good to hear something like this has finally come to an end. Although it deemed successful by stopping the birth of an estimated 400 million babies, there were some places that allowed two children in rural areas if the first was a girl. It is assumed though that even though this is no longer a required policy, many couples may only have one child since it is accepted as a social norm. 

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Arsenic poisoning in rural China - in pictures

Arsenic poisoning in rural China - in pictures | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
Mines and chemical plants mushroomed in the
realgar-rich area around Heshan from the 1950s. Shut down in 2011 due to the pollution they caused, dust and run-off plagues the village to this day

Via pdeppisch
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Waterless World: China’s ever-expanding desert wasteland

Waterless World: China’s ever-expanding desert wasteland | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
As climate change makes vast parts of Inner Mongolia uninhabitable, an official declares: ‘Land desertification is China’s most important ecological problem.’
PIRatE Lab's insight:

Great story and graphic video demonstration of one compenent of climate change.

 

I still find it amazing this lack of will amongst most scientists in China  when it comes to criticizing Chinese policies.  This may be something of a misquote, but my experience shows it may well not be:

 

"Our biggest concern today is not man-made problems, it is climate change and water resources"  Excuse me???  Climate change and you overdrafting of water supplies ARE FUNDAMENTALLY a "man-made" problem.  We have all seen the consequence of such incorrect phrasing and articulation.  We are creating this mess.  I would hope we could be mature enough to own up to the problem and face it head on.

 

This story also does a good job of putting yet another face of the greatest victims of climate change; the poor who eek out a living in marginal environs.

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Inner Mongolia's unauthorised steel factories – in pictures

Inner Mongolia's unauthorised steel factories – in pictures | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
China has vowed to close 1,000 coal mines to reduce its dependence on fossil fuels. But these haunting photographs by the award-winning Canadian photojournalist Kevin Frayer, who travelled to Inner Mongolia to witness the activities of unauthorised steel mills, underline the scale of Beijing’s challenge

Via Garry Rogers
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Garry Rogers's curator insight, November 30, 2016 1:15 PM
It's too easy to bribe local regulators.  And so the use of fossil fuel continues to increase.
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Beijing is sinking at an alarming rate, research shows

Beijing is sinking at an alarming rate, research shows | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
Parts of Beijing are sinking more than 4 inches per year because of over-exploitation of groundwater
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China seeks to fight smog by brainstorm: All ideas welcome

China seeks to fight smog by brainstorm: All ideas welcome | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
The city of Wuhan is considering building skyscrapers coated with a high-tech substance that can "eat" air pollutants. An artist is offering to suck particulates out of Beijing's dirty skies using a giant vacuum-cleaner-type device and sell jewelry made with the collected contaminants. One researcher is suggesting an "urban wind passage" in the Chinese capital, regulating the height and density of buildings so that smog has a dispersal channel.
PIRatE Lab's insight:

Very interesting to see the arc of history repeating.  I recall many of the crazy ideas here in California.  A similar story was had when we needed water during a drought.  And for our famously traffic-clogged highways.  

 

When you go down the same road creating a problem we know is going to happen and just think you will "deal with it" later, the next phase is the outlandish responses to dealing with those problems.  Eventually we get to the mature adult phase wherein we actually tackle the problems of our own creation.  It would be nice if we could just jump to the last phase in the first place.

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China's industry exporting air pollution to U.S.

China's industry exporting air pollution to U.S. | Sustainability Science | Scoop.it
China’s export industry is responsible for dirty emissions that are blowing across the Pacific Ocean and contributing to smog in the United States, a new scientific study says.
PIRatE Lab's insight:

One of the true costs of globalization.  While this is nothing new, it is nice to have yet another data point confirming this.  I frequently use an image of Chinese emissions on a particular day in 2008 to show the Pacific Basin-spanning scale of our modern day manufacturing/polluting industries.  We are all in this together.  We need to solve these problems together.  There is no hiding from a global challenge.

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