Sussex Psych
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Scarecrow of Romney Marsh | Unofficial Britain.

Scarecrow of Romney Marsh | Unofficial Britain. | Sussex Psych | Scoop.it

Across Romney Marsh rides the ‘Scarecrow’, AKA The Reverend Doctor Christopher Syn, leader of Kentish smugglers in Russell Thorndike’s novels.

 

Here are the credits form the Disney TV series from 1963…

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Lair of the Saurian: An exploration of Asda’s Jurassic Car Park, Silverhill, Hastings

Lair of the Saurian: An exploration of Asda’s Jurassic Car Park, Silverhill, Hastings | Sussex Psych | Scoop.it

uperstores and their car parks are generally considered non-places, like budget hotel chains, storage facilities and motorway service stations. It doesn’t matter where in Britain you are, the Premier Inn, IKEA, Tesco, Roadchef or Big Yellow Storage remain consistent. They transcend geography, retaining their distinctive architecture, décor and narrative logic, much like Britain’s imperial outposts during the age of Empire.

 

Recently, it occurred to me that my only experience of a superstore car park was as a customer with a car. I’ve never treated the car park as a pedestrian destination. To remedy this, I set out on foot for the ASDA in Silverhill, Hastings with absolutely no intention of entering the store itself....

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Vision of Britain | William Camden | Berkshire, Surrey and Sussex

Vision of Britain | William Camden | Berkshire, Surrey and Sussex | Sussex Psych | Scoop.it
SUSSEX

UNDER Suth-rey toward the South lieth stretched out in a great length Suth-sex, which also in times past the Regni inhabited, in the Saxon tongue called Suth-sex , and at this day Sussex, which is as much to say as the Region of the South Saxons , a word compounded of the site thereof Southward and of the Saxons, who in their Heptarchie placed here the second kingdome. It lieth upon the British Ocean all Southward with a streight shore (as it were) farre more in length than bredth. Howbeit it hath few harbours by reason that the sea is dangerous for shelves, and therefore rough and troublous, the shore also it selfe full of rocks, and the South-west wind doth tyrannize thereon, casting up beach infinitely. The sea coast of this countrie hath greene hils on it mounting to a greater height, called the Downes, which, because they stand upon a fat chalke or kind of marle, yeeldeth corne aboundantly. The middle tract, garnished with medowes, pastures, corne-fields, and growes [groves] maketh a very lovely shew. The hithermore and Northren side thereof is shaded most pleasantly with woods, like as in times past the whole country throughout, which by reason of the woods was hardly passable. for the wood Andradswald, in the British language Coid Andred , taking the name of Anderida the Citty next adjoining, tooke up in this quarter, a hundered and twentie miles in length and thirtie in bredth, memorable for the death of Sigebert King of the West Saxons, who, beeing deposed from his roiall throne, was in this place stabbed by a Swineheard and so died. Many prety rivers it hath, but such as springing out of the North side of the shire forthwith take their course to the Ocean, and therefore not able to beare any vessell of burden. Full of iron mines it is in sundry places, where for the making and fining whereof there bee furnaces on every side, and a huge deale of wood is yearely spent, to which purpose divers brookes in many places are brought to runne in one chanell, and sundry medowes turned into poles and waters, that they might bee of power sufficient to drive hammer milles, which beating upon the iron resound all over the places adjoyning. And yet the iron here rought is not in every place of like goodnesse, but generally more brittle than is Spanish iron, whether it bee by the nature or tincture and temper thereof. Howbeit, commodious enough to the iron Maisters who cast much great ordinance thereof, and other things to their no small gaine. Now whether it bee as gainefull and profitable to the common-wealth may be doubted, but the age ensuing will bee better able to tell you. Neither want here glass-houses, but the Glasse there made, by reason of the matter of making, I wot not whether, is likewise nothing so pure and cleare, and thereof used of the common sort onely.

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Urban Sketchers: Hastings harbour, East Sussex

Urban Sketchers: Hastings harbour, East Sussex | Sussex Psych | Scoop.it
Hastings harbour, East Sussex. The working harbour at Hastings, on the south coast of England, is unusual because the fishing boats are hauled up onto the shingle beach at the end of each outing. This view of the confusing ...
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Dramatic footage of Rock-a-Nore cliff collapse - Hastings and St. Leonards Observer

Dramatic footage of Rock-a-Nore cliff collapse - Hastings and St. Leonards Observer | Sussex Psych | Scoop.it
Hastings and St. Leonards Observer
Dramatic footage of Rock-a-Nore cliff collapse
Hastings and St. Leonards Observer
THIS is the dramatic moment hundreds of tonnes of earth and rock crashed to the ground at Rock-a-Nore.
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Chanctonbury Ring | Mysterious Britain & Ireland

Chanctonbury Ring | Mysterious Britain & Ireland | Sussex Psych | Scoop.it

Chanctonbury Ring is a hill on the Sussex Downs some 700 feet above sea level and, until the hurricane, which swept across Southern England, was crowned with beech trees. Excavations at the site showed that the ramparts dated from 300 BC.

 

As with other lonely wooded spots there are many stories and legends concerning ghosts and the devil. Legend has it that the devil had a hand in the formation of Chanctonbury Ring. When he discovered that the inhabitants of Sussex were being converted from previous pagan religions to Christianity he decided to drown them

 

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Hastings: Zombie Walk

Hastings: Zombie Walk | Sussex Psych | Scoop.it
YOU could be forgiven that the town looked like a scene straight from a horror movie on Saturday (October 26) as more than 300 zombies took park in the second annual 1066 Walk of the Dead zombie walk.
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Hasting: A Cursed Town or Media Hype?

A brief film about the supposed 'curse' on the town of Hastings and St Leonards on Sea in East Sussex....

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Brighton's petrolheads: portrait of a unique community - The Guardian

Brighton's petrolheads: portrait of a unique community - The Guardian | Sussex Psych | Scoop.it
The Guardian Brighton's petrolheads: portrait of a unique community The Guardian They gather every Tuesday evening on Brighton seafront, come rain or shine, and park up in a neat line: Nissan Skylines, VW Golfs, Ford Fiestas, Lexuses, Daihatsus and...
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The Stag Inn, Hastings

Stag Inn, Hastings

The Stag Inn is a public house in the Old Town area of Hastings, a port and seaside resort in East Sussex, England. One of many ancient buildings on All Saints Street, the 16th-century timber-framed inn was refronted in the 18th century, but many of its original features remain.

The Stag Inn is a public house in the Old Town area of Hastings, a port and seaside resort in East Sussex, England. One of many ancient buildings on All Saints Street, the 16th-century timber-framed inn was refronted in the 18th century, but many of its original features remain. The preserved bodies of two smoke-blackened mummified cats have been displayed on a wall since their discovery in the 19th century; witchcraft has been suggested as an explanation for this "grisly sight".

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Life Among the Concrete: A Harbour Wall Dérive

Life Among the Concrete: A Harbour Wall Dérive | Sussex Psych | Scoop.it

he Stade is a shingle beach from where fishermen launch their boats. At low tide the shingle is strung with fish heads and crab claws.

 

A harbour wall protects the beach. Herring gulls stand sentry as I approach over rocks and an iron bar encrusted in mussels. The wall’s only a couple of hundred metres long. But as I get in close a peculiar world opens up....

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Dead Cats, Cold Curry & a Broken Heart at The Stag

Dead Cats, Cold Curry & a Broken Heart at The Stag | Sussex Psych | Scoop.it

It’s a wintry Wednesday night at The Stag, a Tudor pub in Hastings  old town.

 

I sit beneath a cabinet containing two smoke-dried cats, discovered in the pub’s chimney in the 1940s.

 

The official story is the weirdest: these cats belonged to Hannah Clarke, a witch who lived here in the 16th Century. At night she’d fly across the town on her broomstick, surveying the coastline for French invaders. She sealed the cats into the brickwork as a charm to ward off the plague.

 

The less popular and more likely story – explained to me by the owner – was that the cats crawled into the chimney for warmth. Then someone unwittingly lit a fire.

 

“I’ve actually bought another mummified cat since,” he says, proudly.

I’m impressed. Two mummified Tudor cats are just two mummified cats. But three mummified Tudor cats are a collection.

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Dragons & Serpents In Sussex

Dragons & Serpents In Sussex | Sussex Psych | Scoop.it

In Sussex, Dragon legends seem to be restricted to the West, though whether this is due to any particular geographical or cultural reason or just a hole in the folklore record is not clear. Serpents were seen as very unlucky in Sussex, probably due to association with the Devil, and this extended to Dragons. Accounts of such beasts go back a long way, with the 8th century Anglo-Saxon Chronicle which mentions "Wondrous Adders that were to be seen in the land of the South Saxons". Around the same time, Ethelward's Chronicle of 770AD mentions "Monstrous serpents were seen in the country of the Southern Angles that is called Sussex". Maybe they are the last remnants of some form of dinosaur, Iguanodon bones have been found in Tilgate forest, not too far from St. Leonards forest where one of the Sussex dragon tales is set.

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Shadwell's Folly and the House of Usher - Hastings and St. Leonards Observer

Shadwell's Folly and the House of Usher - Hastings and St. Leonards Observer | Sussex Psych | Scoop.it
Hastings and St. Leonards Observer
Shadwell's Folly and the House of Usher
Hastings and St. Leonards Observer
He was a pupil of the Georgian architect Decimus Burton who's father James Burton started building St Leonards as a holiday resort in 1828.
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An interview with Salena Godden, Author of Springfield Road

An interview with Salena Godden, Author of Springfield Road | Sussex Psych | Scoop.it
Salena Godden discusses memory, her new book, and her experience of growing up in Hastings in the 1970s.
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Hastings Borough Bonfire Society

Hastings Borough Bonfire Society | Sussex Psych | Scoop.it

Toward the end of October 1554, a Bible-reading was taking place in the home in Black Lion St  (now site of the Black Lion Pub) of one Dirick Carver, a brewer from Brighthelmstone (now Brighton) with John Launder, Thomas Iveson and William Veisey. Under the command of Sir Edward Gage, the High Sheriff of Sussex, the four men were arrested at prayer. It was a short matter of time before they were brought before the court of Bonner, the Bishop of London in Newgate, London. They were kept there until 8 June 1855. After forced confessions were signed, their fate was sealed. On 22 July 1555, Dirick Carver, was taken by his Catholic persecutors, to Lewes town centre to be burned outside of the Old Star Inn, where the Town Hall currently stands. His Bible was taken from him and thrown into a barrel on the pyre. The crowd called to him, pleading God to strengthen his resolve and his faith. He knelt down and prayed, but was then forced to climb into the barrel too. Carver took his Bible and threw it into the surrounding crowd. His final words were: “Lord have mercy upon me, for unto thee I commend my spirit and my soul doth rejoice in thee!” His Bible was preserved and is on display in Lewes Museum today. Clear evidence of his blood splattered on the pages of Judges, Zephaniah and Ruth is a graphic reminder of his physical ordeal. On 6 June 1556, four more Protestants were taken to their flaming deaths in Lewes. Thos Harland, John Oswold, Thos Avington and Thos Reed had all spent a great deal of time in prison, and still rejected the Mass and refused to go to a church where the language was one they would not understand. Despite these deaths, Bonner, the Bishop of London was not convinced that the heretics were being persuaded back to the Roman faith. So he arranged the largest bonfire of humans the town or indeed the country had seen. The ten hapless Protestants were: Richard Woodman, George Stevens, Alexander Hosman, William Mainard, Thomasina Wood, Margery Morris, James Morris, Denis Burges, Ann Ashdon and Mary Groves.

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Hastings: Doing Bonfire Night Differently

Hastings: Doing Bonfire Night Differently | Sussex Psych | Scoop.it

I hadn’t realised,  until I read the programme issued by the Hastings Borough Bonfire Society, that all this November 5th junketing derives from James I’s decree in 1605 that the foiling of Catesby’s plot to blow up Parliament was to be celebrated annually for ever after.  Why the good people of Sussex in particular, should have taken it up with such alacrity, and still use the occasion each year for torchlight processions, bonfires and fireworks, still remains a mystery, writes Antony Mair

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A stunning sunset - Hastings and St. Leonards Observer

A stunning sunset - Hastings and St. Leonards Observer | Sussex Psych | Scoop.it
A stunning sunset
Hastings and St. Leonards Observer
AWASH with colour, this photograph of Hastings Pier has been awarded 'judges' favourite' in the BBC Countryfile annual photography competition.
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DISCOVERING FOSSILS | Hastings (East Sussex)

DISCOVERING FOSSILS | Hastings (East Sussex) | Sussex Psych | Scoop.it
Roy Shepherd introduces the palaeontology of the Hastings area.
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In pictures: Sussex shrine to extinct bird the dodo - BBC News

In pictures: Sussex shrine to extinct bird the dodo - BBC News | Sussex Psych | Scoop.it
In pictures: Sussex shrine to extinct bird the dodo
BBC News
In pictures: Sussex shrine to extinct bird the dodo. Ralfe Whistler is a naturalist, but one with a difference - he has a passion for the dodo, a bird that died out hundreds of years ago.
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