Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy
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Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy
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Practical Tips For Raising Better Kids!

Practical Tips For Raising Better Kids! | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it
Parenting & Education Blog: "Practical Tips For Raising Better Kids!
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Zaziceva's curator insight, December 17, 2012 7:12 AM

Give them opportunities to explore and treat them like they're capable (for sure they are or can be).

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Does Mommy Need a Social Media Diet? (Why Modeling Matters) | The Digital Media Diet

Does Mommy Need a Social Media Diet? (Why Modeling Matters) | The Digital Media Diet | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it

A post several months ago, on Mashable.com, caught my eye. It was called “5 Lessons for Parenting in the Digital Age” and had a nice list of things to consider when parenting our digital natives – kids that are immersed in a digital world that excites and challenges today’s parents.

 

The list included:

 

Technology No Longer Has Boundaries


Know When to Cut it Off


The Difference Between Preference and Addiction


Focus on Technology That Truly Connects Us to Our Kids


Model the Balance


Up until number five, I was feeling pretty smug …


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The 10 Types of Educational Apps and When To Use Them – Kindertown

The 10 Types of Educational Apps and When To Use Them – Kindertown | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it

Many educators and parents are searching for apps that provide the best environment for learning to take place. Generally, this means apps that deliver meaningful content with an in-depth experience incorporating discovery and challenge. These apps are often “free-play” or “choice-filled” games which encourage kids to engage in their own learning. They have activities designed to support the child as they progress and master tasks.

 

However, a lot of apps don’t fit this ideal. They don’t offer children independent choices and they stay on the surface of educational subjects instead of diving into deep thinking. What about these apps? Is there value in them too or should we encourage people not to use them?

 

Just because we have an ideal doesn’t mean there isn’t value in the other experiences. To help me make sense of the different kinds of apps I have reviewed and the different values they offer, I created 10 overlapping categories. Sounds like a lot? It is. It gets even more complicated because many apps fit into two or three different categories. There are just so many different kinds of educational apps. We would be remiss to overlook how each gives something a little different to a child’s learning experience ...


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Everday inquiry and inquiry learning

Everday inquiry and inquiry learning | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it

Wrapping IL with Inquiry Learning - In this post I outline the characteristics of everyday inquiry and explain how everyday inquiry is related to inquiry learning. Everyday inquiry involves asking questions, and finding and using inf...


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I’ve been nominated ‘The Most Inspirational Therapist or Coach’

I’ve been nominated ‘The Most Inspirational Therapist or Coach’ | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it
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Controlling Parents More Likely to Have Delinquent Children

Controlling Parents More Likely to Have Delinquent Children | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it

"The researchers evaluated three parenting styles: authoritative, authoritarian, and permissive.


Authoritative parents are both demanding and controlling, but they are also warm and receptive to their children’s needs. They are receptive to bidirectional communication in that they explain to their children why they have established rules and also listen to their children’s opinions about those rules. Children of authoritative parents tend to be self-reliant, self-controlled, and content.


On the other hand, authoritarian parents are demanding and highly controlling, but detached and unreceptive to their children’s needs. These parents support unilateral communication where they establish rules without explanation and expect them to be obeyed without complaint or question. Authoritarian parenting produces children who are discontent, withdrawn, and distrustful.


Finally, in contrast to authoritarian parenting, permissive parents are nondemanding and noncontrolling. They tend to be warm and receptive to their children’s needs, but place few boundaries on their children. If they do establish rules, they rarely enforce them to any great extent. These parents tend to produce children who are the least self-reliant, explorative, and self-controlled out of all the parenting styles."


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How do children build trust? Where do they begin? 8 tips to consider.

How do children build trust? Where do they begin? 8 tips to consider. | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it

"The children who grow up in homes where love is offered, boundaries are given, eye contact is made, games are played, laughter is free flowing, violence is non-existent and time is spent together...are likely to grow up to be healthy, happy, loving, emotionally intelligent grown-ups."


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The Secret to Raising Entrepreneurial Kids - Forbes

The Secret to Raising Entrepreneurial Kids - Forbes | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it

Richard Branson may have been shy as a boy - but not anymore (Image via Wikipedia) Mary Mazzio – filmmaker-in-residence at entrepreneurial hotbed Babson College – has made a name for herself chronicling the success stories of business innovators.

"So what has Mazzio learned from interviewing global entrepreneurs? Her surprising answer is that entrepreneurship can be taught – and her films have inspired her to raise her own children differently. Here are four lessons from the world’s top business leaders that Mazzio has incorporated into her family’s life."

http://www.forbes.com/sites/dorieclark/2012/02/01/the-secret-to-raising-entrepreneurial-kids/


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Motherhood: The Invisible Profession | Psychology Today

Motherhood: The Invisible Profession | Psychology Today | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it

"The hardest job I've ever had is being a mother."

"Through this haze, they must learn to be master interpreters of their child's behavior, reflexively using hypothetico-deductive reasoning to decipher the secret codes of their baby's cries, movements, facial expressions, connecting them to what had come just before and testing out their theories. Every mother is a Behavioral Scientist whose dissertation subject is her children, and who is regularly assessing the methodological errors in her "experiments." Her feelings of love are fueled by feelings of achievement, her own and her children's, as she remembers with each step all the tumbles that had preceded it. Only, her doctoral work is never complete, and a degree never awarded. Children are like the Borg on Star Trek; as soon as you've mastered one set of their behaviors, they shift to a new frequency, and the learning curve starts again. We may wait many years before we, and society, see some of the ultimate results of our work."

Read more: http://www.psychologytoday.com/collections/201204/my-mother-myself/motherhood-the-invisible-profession


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How Parents Can Stay Involved with their Teen or Tween

How Parents Can Stay Involved with their Teen or Tween | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it
How Parents Can Stay Involved with their Teen or Tween http://t.co/UjlxYUvn...

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Price Tags for Parents - New York Times (blog)

Price Tags for Parents - New York Times (blog) | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it
Price Tags for ParentsNew York Times (blog)The indirect costs of parenting - particularly time - are enormous and rarely quantified, reducing the public recognition that parents receive for this work, an economist writes.
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Survey: Top 10 ways kids hide their online activity from parents - Kansas City Star

Survey: Top 10 ways kids hide their online activity from parents - Kansas City Star | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it
Survey: Top 10 ways kids hide their online activity from parentsKansas City StarFrom clearing their browser history to creating private email addresses, teens are increasingly leveraging their tech-savvy skills to hide their online activities from...
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A Law To Visit Your Parents?

A Law To Visit Your Parents? | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it
Shocked by a statistics that more than 33% of Chinese people visit their parents but once a year (and nearly 12% haven't visited in many years), lawmakers in China are pondering an amendment to China's elderly rights law ...
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One week of therapy may help reorganize brain, reduce stuttering

One week of therapy may help reorganize brain, reduce stuttering | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it
Just one week of speech therapy may reorganize the brain, helping to reduce stuttering, according to a study published in the August 8, 2012, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Using Pinterest to Find Summer Reading Activities

Using Pinterest to Find Summer Reading Activities | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it
I love Pinterest.  I can spend hours on it, just looking at things.  I can find ideas for ANYTHING on there!   Recipes, funny and/or inspirational sayings, and photos of places I want to visit....

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Serotonin And Happiness Are Regulated By Gut Bacteria - BMED Report

University of College Cork (UCC) scientists have shown that brain levels of serotonin, the ‘happy hormone,’ are regulated by the amount of bacteria in the gut during early life.  Their research is being published today in the leading international...

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Improving Children's Literature in Digital Spaces

Improving Children's Literature in Digital Spaces | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it
How do we know if a digital book is of a quality to support children's literacy development? An answer to this question must be constructed by all who contribute to a child's growth as a literate person.

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9 Ways to Raise a Global Kid

9 Ways to Raise a Global Kid | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it

"Help your child appreciate other cultures."

"Giving children a more global outlook prepares them for the future. They'll be more likely to be able to tackle the environmental, economic, political, technological, and public-health challenges they'll inherit, says Fernando M. Reimers, Ed.D., professor of international education at Harvard Graduate School of Education. And experts agree that a global perspective is going to be a key skill in our ever more digitally connected workplace. "Companies on the S & P 500 now generate 46 percent of their profits outside the U.S.," says Mortenson. "If you want students who are capable and competitive, we need to be able to prepare them differently. Kids who grow up with an international outlook are comfortable knowing that there may not be one clear-cut answer but a variety of perspectives."


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SMART PARENTING: Stop comparing, start living - New Straits Times

SMART PARENTING: Stop comparing, start living - New Straits Times | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it

"As parents, this is also a critical step to do for our children. Truly successful parents are those who can maximise their children’s capabilities, not those who can achieve the highest goals at the expense of their childhood.

 

The first step is to encourage our kids to find and understand their own strengths and weaknesses. We must also stop the urge to compare their academic performance or behaviours with siblings, friends or worst, their cousins.

 

While we can point out other people’s achievements or good behaviours, we must be very careful in doing so because children will pick up the wrong signals. If we say things like “Why can’t you be more like your cousins?” the children may read that the parents prefer their cousins to them. That is a very bad signal as it will definitely damage the good parent-child relationships. When this happens, it is very hard to get back on track and we may have temporarily lost their trust."

 

Read more: SMART PARENTING: Stop comparing, start living - Sunday Life & Times - New Straits Times http://www.nst.com.my/life-times/sunday-life-times/smart-parenting-stop-comparing-start-living-1.45177#ixzz1mFJy4s4f

SMART PARENTING: Stop comparing, start living

New Straits TimesBy Zaid Mohamad 


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The Only Child: Debunking the Myths

The Only Child: Debunking the Myths | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it

"Only children are supposed to be spoiled, selfish and lonely."

"A Stereotype Is Born
The image of the lonely only — or at least the legitimizing of that idea — was the work of one man, Granville Stanley Hall. About 120 years ago, Hall established one of the first American psychology-research labs and was a leader of the child-study movement. A national network of study groups called Hall Clubs existed to spread his teachings. But what he is most known for today is supervising the 1896 study "Of Peculiar and Exceptional Children," which described a series of only-child oddballs as permanent misfits. Hall — and every other fledgling psychologist — knew close to nothing about credible research practices. Yet for decades, academics and advice columnists alike disseminated his conclusion that an only child could not be expected to go through life with the same capacity for adjustment that children with siblings possessed. "Being an only child is a disease in itself," he claimed."

"Generally, those studies showed that singletons aren't measurably different from other kids — except that they, along with firstborns and people who have only one sibling, score higher in measures of intelligence and achievement. No one, Falbo says, has published research that can demonstrate any truth behind the stereotype of the only child as lonely, selfish and maladjusted. (She has spoken those three words so many times in the past 35 years that they run together as one: lonelyselfishmaladjusted.) Falbo and Polit later completed a second quantitative review of more than 200 personality studies. By and large, they found that the personalities of only children were indistinguishable from their peers with siblings."


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Women in the Media: You Can't Be What You Can't See | PhD in Parenting

Women in the Media: You Can't Be What You Can't See | PhD in Parenting | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it

"Let Them See

I want our daughters to look out into society and see that they can be anything they want to be. I want them to see women in roles that include President, teacher, mother, lawyer, scientist, construction worker, astronaut, activist, engineer, doctor, farmer and more. I want them to see women expressing opinions, calling the shots, giving expert advice, and standing up for what they believe in. I want them to see women doing all of those things, without people commenting first and foremost on their bodies, their clothing, and their make-up. I want our daughters to believe that they can be anything they want to be, not just because we've told them that, but because they see that mirrored back to them in society.

I want all girls to believe that they have a chance to be whatever they want to be. Not just those girls with the trailblazer gene."

http://www.phdinparenting.com/2012/04/21/women-in-the-media-you-cant-be-what-you-cant-see/


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Single Parent Tips: Avoid the Morning School Rush

Single Parent Tips: Avoid the Morning School Rush | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it
"It's all in the timing."

Never has this statement been more true than trying to wrestle a toddler into shoes, a teen into consciousness and yourself into a pair of pantyhose in the morning befo...

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Raising Kids In Our Digital Media World

Raising Kids In Our Digital Media World | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it

New media technologies are changing rapidly. The opportunities and challenges for parents and their children can be both exciting and intimidating. This slideshow from Common Sense Media gives a good overview of the changing media landscape and provides a framework for understanding its impact on your kids.


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Parenting: Stay-at-home dads are happy - 6abc.com

Parenting: Stay-at-home dads are happy - 6abc.com | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it
6abc.comParenting: Stay-at-home dads are happy6abc.comLosing a job forces dads into stay-at-home fatherhood, while their wives have either kept their jobs or were able to find one quicker.
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Care for some Parenting Classes? | 99percentblog

Care for some Parenting Classes? | 99percentblog | Sue Atkins Parenting Made Easy | Scoop.it
programme offering parenting classes to expectant parents and those with children up to the age of two. The programme is expected to start on a piloting basis in Middleborough, Camden (North London) and High Peak ...
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