Stuff I Found Intriguing
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Stuff I Found Intriguing
Websites that contain unique and imaginative content that I personally find useful and/or fascinating
Curated by John Jung
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Serendipity+creativity =" Random Acts of Legacy"

Serendipity+creativity =" Random Acts of Legacy" | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
"What emerges from a pile of deteriorating 16mm home movies spanning from 1936 to 1951, is a moving story of a Chinese American family set against the backdrop of race and class in Chicago, and one collector’s obsession with the 1933-4 World’s Fair. 

Rescued from an online auction, the filmmaker's quest to make meaning of this Chinese American family’s early home movies connects him with Irena Lum – the surviving daughter of graphic artist and collector, Silas Henry Fung."
John Jung's insight:
Ali Kazimi, a filmmaker on the faculty of York University in Toronto, bid successfully for depression era 16 mm home movies of the  Chinese American family of commercial artist, Silas Fung, and with the aid of Fung's daughter, Irena Lum, create this documentary of the life of a Chinese American family in Chicago.

link to trailer:

http://socialdoc.net/ali-kazimi/random-acts-of-legacy-2016/
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14 Phenomenal Photos Reveal There Were Indeed Black Chinese People

14 Phenomenal Photos Reveal There Were Indeed Black Chinese People | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
In a once-popular commercial for Calgon detergent in the 1970s, a curious housewife probes the
John Jung's insight:
"China’s Qing Dynasty, established by the Manchu people who ruled from 1644–1912, is described as having been a vast multicultural empire. But it appears multicultural might also be a euphemism for multiracial. Nothing illustrates this better than the black and white photos taken by visitors from Europe in the mid-to-late 1800s. John Thomson, an Irish photographer, was one of the first to capture images that reveal a surprisingly more diverse makeup of then-contemporary China."
Note that these photographs were taken around 1870s when cameras were 'primitive; by today's camera, making it quite remarkable that they were so detailed, even if posed.  

All of the photos in this article were taken by six photographers over a span of 50 years, between 1869 and 1919. And the locations where the images were captured spanned the face of China: From a small town in what was once held by China as its “Pacified South” to its capital city of Beijing in the north,  Black Chinese  played incredibly surprising and largely forgotten parts in unwritten chapters of Chinese history. But their pictures offer historians a great place to begin.
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Michael Derrick Hudson, Before You Steal My Chinese Name

Michael Derrick Hudson, Before You Steal My Chinese Name | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Know that you are trying to steal from a naming ritual and culture that goes back five thousand years.
John Jung's insight:
Writer Sharlene Chiang explains the logic behind the structure of names for Chinese, using her name to illustrate how this system identies relatives across generations. She then shifts her focus to describe her personal experiences with racist taunts and how she tried to be "white" when growing up, and wondering "Why did I have to be Chinese"

But when she became a mother she tries to instill Chinese identity in her daughter, 

"See me spend half my income on my daughter’s tuition to a Chinese immersion school where she learns to read, write, sing, and play in a language I wanted to have nothing to do with for much of my life."
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The symbolism of food at Chinese New Year

The symbolism of food at Chinese New Year | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
‍Guest commentary by Frank Sun
John Jung's insight:
A fascinating explanation of the symbolism of the special foods served in celebration of Chinese New Year. Many names of these foods are homophones or homonyms in the Chinese language  - they convey expressions of prosperity, good fortune and mostly hope for a good life.

Fish is one of the best examples of a food that sounds like an expression of desired prosperity. The word for fish (鱼“yu”) sounds exactly like the word for “leftover” or “surplus” which signifies a life of abundance and prosperity, good fortune and surplus for the lunar year about to begin.
 
Consider the fruits eaten during Chinese New Year,   Tangerines that ripen in the season of the New Year holidays is a homophone for “luck” (桔子), and while the word for orange (橙子) is a homophone for success (成). The word for pomelo is (柚子) which means “once more” or “again”, so if you share it with family or friends, you get to see them again.
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Kenneth R Marks - YouTube

Kenneth R Marks - YouTube | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Ancestor Hunter | Family History Website Creator | Genealogy Fanatic | Searcher of all things seen and unseen
John Jung's insight:
This YouTube Channel provides videos on a myriad of useful search strategies and resources for 'ancestor search' and other searches of the past in newspapers and other archival resources.
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Chinatown’s Ghost Scam

Chinatown’s Ghost Scam | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
When elderly immigrants fall prey to fraudsters promising protective blessings, their life savings are spirited away.
John Jung's insight:
Immigrants, Chinese or others, face many difficulties in a new country such as discrimination from native populations.  But they also face exploitation and financial scams perpetrated agains them from unscrupulous people of their own ethnicity who play on their superstitions and trust of people from their own background and speak the same language. 
 
The "ghost scam" or "blessing scam" is one where a team of 3-4 Chinese women play upon the fears of elderly Chinese women by offering to help protect them against evil forces.  The victim is asked to bring valuables and cash savings in a bag which the scammers will give a blessing to and then return the bag, which must not be opened for 49 days or the blessing will be broken.  When the victim finally opens the bag, she discovers that the scammers has taken her valuables and replaced them with boxes of corn starch and laundry detergent. 

The scammers get away with their rip-offs because many victims are too embarrassed to report their losses to the police.
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Intermarriage in the U.S. 50 Years After Loving v. Virginia

Intermarriage in the U.S. 50 Years After Loving v. Virginia | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
In 2015, 17% of all U.S. newlyweds had a spouse of a different race or ethnicity, marking more than a fivefold increase since 1967, when the landmark Supreme
John Jung's insight:
The influential Pew Research Center examined interracial or interethnic marriages in the U. S. and found they increased from 3 to 17 percent overall since 1967, the year that the law against interracial marriages was ended in Virginia. The report implies that this large increase was due, at least, partly to this important legal decision.  
However, this may be overstated, as other societal changes also occurred during the 1960s and subsequently that would have increased interracial marriages even without the Loving v. Virginia decision.  One could argue that the more liberal attitudes and increasing population diversity of the era contributed to this increase, which in turn could have contributed to the Virginia decision.
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A conversation with 2 Chinese adoptees from China to white parents in the U.S. - SupChina

A conversation with 2 Chinese adoptees from China to white parents in the U.S. - SupChina | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
A conversation with Chinese adoptees in the U.S.
John Jung's insight:
"In April 1992, China implemented a law that, for the first time, allowed families from other countries to adopt Chinese children. Since then, around 120,000 Chinese have been adopted abroad, with 80,000 finding a home in the United States. .
..
 Rae Winborn is one of that first wave of adoptees, brought over at just nine months old to the U.S. to grow up with a white, middle-class American family in Durango, Colorado. 

 Charlotte Cotter was adopted a few years later at the age of five months in 1995, and grew up with two moms in Newton, Massachusetts. She is now the president of China’s Children International, a support and networking organization run by and for Chinese adoptees around the world, which she co-founded in 2011. 

 Kaiser and Jeremy had a conversation with Rae and Charlotte about their experiences growing up in America, why they both chose to learn Chinese and spend time working in China — which Rae described as the “Chinese-American experience on steroids” — and what it was like when Charlotte made contact with her birth family."

 Many aspects of the psychological issues for adoptees are discussed in detail with these very articulate women.  Many of the topics are relevant for transnational adoptions from other countries.
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Flipbook of "Green Turtle"

Flipbook of "Green Turtle" | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Real Heroes FIRST ISSUE! ShadowHero COMICS
John Jung's insight:
Graphic artist Gene Yang (American Born Chinese) brings to life the Green Turtle, the 1940s concept of Chu Hing for a Chinese "super hero" that didn't succeed.

The comic can be read or downloaded as a pdf from this Panda Express site:  https://www.pandaexpress.com/asian-pacific-american-heritage-month
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Did My Family Really Come “Legally”?

Did My Family Really Come “Legally”? | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Many people assume that their family immigrated to the United States legally, or did it “the right way.” In most cases, this statement does not reflect the fact that the U.S. immigration system was very different in the past and that their families might not have been allowed to enter had today’s laws been in effect.
John Jung's insight:
An historical perspective on today's hot topic, immigration policy and "illegal" immigrants. Ancestors of many people could be considered "illegal" by current laws.
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From Shanghai to Harlem via Trinidad and Mississippi Over Generations

"From Shanghai to Harlem" is an American migration and immigration story produced by awarding-winning team of Narrative Network (Sylvia Wong Lewis) and LS
John Jung's insight:
An amazing account of a successful multigenerational mixed race family by Sylvia Wong Lewis about her grandparents and parents from China, the West indies, Mississippi, and Harlem.

For more info on Sylvia Wong Lewis:
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Legacy Family Tree Webinars : Webinar Library

Legacy Family Tree Webinars : Webinar Library | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Legacy Family Tree Webinars
John Jung's insight:
A rich source of varied webinars on fascinating issues, methods, and tips about genealogical research.
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Liverpool U. K. Chinese Seamen During WWII

Liverpool U. K. Chinese Seamen During WWII | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
The story of 2,000 Chinese men, mostly recruited from Shanghai, to supply needed noncombat manpower such as digging trenches for U.K. during WW II is a sad one. After the war, they were forcibly "expatriated" to China even though many had formed families with British women, purchased property, and owned businesses during their stay.  For moving photos of the Chinese men living in their impoverished surroundings, see:

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/37298298_Bert_Hardy's_ChinatownMay_1942


John Jung's insight:
The story of 2,000 Chinese men, mostly recruited from Shanghai, to supply needed noncombat manpower such as digging trenches  for U.K. during WW II is a sad one. After the war, they were forcibly "expatriated" to China even though many had formed families with British women, purchased property, and owned businesses during their stay.

A set of never published poignant photographs of the Liverpool Chinese seaman by Bert Hardy was used by Professor Gregory Lee, whose grandfather was one of the Chinese laborers, in his lecture about this little known story.   To see the collection, go to::
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"One Drop of Blood", by Lawrence Wright

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John Jung's insight:
A discussion of the complexities of classifying race in the census which are further complicated by the increase of mixed race families that leads many to check off more than one box for race on the census form. 

Because of the "one drop of blood" societal bias, children of a black and a white couple, have been counted as black as only 100% white were counted as white. 

However, as more children of black-white couples who in past decades  would have been classified as 'Black,"  more of them now check off more than one box. But by  reducing the size of  the Black category, previous social policies aimed at redressing past injustices against Black will be weakened.  Similar problems would exist for children of other mixtures of races.  As the author, Lawrence Wright noted:

"But multiracialism introduces nightmares of its own. If people are to be counted as something other than completely black, for instance, how will affirmative-action programs be implemented? Suppose a court orders a city to hire additional black police officers to make up for past discrimination. Will mixed race officers count? Will they count wholly or partly? Far from solving the problem of fragmented identities, multiracialism could open the door to fractional races, such as we already have in the case of the American Indians. In order to be eligible for certain federal benefits, such as housing-improvement programs, a person must prove that he or she either is a member of a federally recognized Indian tribe or has fifty per cent "Indian blood." One can envision a situation in which nonwhiteness itself becomes the only valued quality, to be compensated in various ways depending on a person's pedigree."
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Immigrant and Emigrant Populations by Country of Origin and Destination

Immigrant and Emigrant Populations by Country of Origin and Destination | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
As of 2015, the number of international migrants worldwide stood at almost 244 million (or 3.3 percent of the world’s population), according to UN Population Division estimates. This incredibly handy map shows the immigrant and emigrant populations by country of origin and destination. Select a country from the dropdown menu to learn where immigrants originate and the countries in which emigrants settle. If "emigrants" is selected, bubbles will appear over top countries of destination, sized according to the estimated emigrant population in each country.
John Jung's insight:
Powerful interactive visual resource mapping (im)migrants and emigrants populations in countries around the world based on 2015 statistics.
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Seats, Squats, and Leaves: A Brief History of Chinese Toilets

Seats, Squats, and Leaves: A Brief History of Chinese Toilets | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Why does the nation squat, and not sit, when using the john?
John Jung's insight:
China, even today, has not embraced flush toilets, much to the consternation of tourists from the west. This article explores some of the cultural, economic, and health issues behind the continued use of 'squat' toilets.
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Racist Chinese Laundry Commercial Sparks Outrage

Racist Chinese Laundry Commercial Sparks Outrage | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Recently, a Chinese detergent brand, Qiaobi, ran a commercial that sparked international outrage for its racist implications.
John Jung's insight:
In the viral Chinese ad for Qiaobi, an Asian woman is doing laundry before she is joined by a young black man leaning by the doorway. He has white paint splattered on his face, arms and pants, and wears a brown-stained white shirt. He walks towards the woman, exchanging flirtatious advances as she motions him to come closer. Once she lures him in close enough for a kiss, the woman shoves a detergent pod into his mouth and forces him head-first into the washing machine.
Smiling, she hops on top of the rumbling machine while muffled pleas are heard from inside. Much to many upset viewers’ surprise, an Asian man emerges from the machine in the same outfit – clean white shirt included. The commercial ends with the woman delighted with the new development and the closing voiceover, “Change, it all starts from Qiaobi laundry detergent pod.”

In addition to the controversy over the racism, there is plaigarism as it is highly similar to a 2006 Italian detergent commercial where  a young Italian woman is doing her laundry when a scrawny white male appears, in loose drawers and white tube socks. Though initially upset to see the man, the woman flirtatiously motions the man to come closer, luring him to the laundry machine, which she also shoves him into. Only this time, a young, athletically-toned black man emerges from the machine. Gaping at his physique against the background rap music, the woman appears very pleased with her results. The commercial then ends with three words flashed across the screen: "Coloured is better."
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The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao

The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Jonathan Chatwin  Oct.2017 book review of "The Souls of China" by Ian Johnson published  in www.chinainsight.info
John Jung's insight:
The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao by Pulitizer Prize winning Ian Johnson uses three different groups of Chinese to explore the recovery of religious or spiritual experience in China after the extreme suppression of religion by Mao's Communist China from 1949 for a quarter of a century, a restriction that exceeded the earlier rejection of Western religion at the end of the Qing Dynasty in an effort to eliminate superstition and bring China into the modern world.

Johnson describes faith and spirituality in a Shanzi family of Daoist funeral masters, a group of Beijing pilgrims in a shrine, and in a protestant congregation in Chendu.

Johnson noted a shift in Chinese belief back to the ancient lunisolar calendar that was dropped in 1929, a system that divides the year into 24 phases associated with seasonal changes.  He attributes this shift to a renewed belief in the "interdependence of earth and sky, and the connection between the spiritual, the animal and the inanimate worlds" that may reflect the growing emptiness of an emphasis on materialism.

A well-written presentation, and whether one accepts the interpretation, the book is important in examining a relatively neglected and suppressed topic in China over the past century.

To view the review in a larger font: go to p.12 on this site:
https://www.chinainsight.info/images/past_issues/2017/2017_10.pdf
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How Anti-Chinese Propaganda Helped Fuel the Creation of Mestizo Identity in Mexico

How Anti-Chinese Propaganda Helped Fuel the Creation of Mestizo Identity in Mexico | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Uncovering the forgotten history of anti-Chinese propaganda and violence during the Mexican revolution, this book reads like a dossier of state secrets.
John Jung's insight:
Chinese in Mexico, as in other countries, were badly treated even though they made major economic contributions to the country. In his book, Chino: Anti-Chinese Racism in Mexico, 1880-1940,  ProfessorJason Oliver Chang documents the racism against Chinese from the revolution up to the 1940s.

"By centering the Chinese in the drama of Mexican history, Chang opens up a fascinating untold story about the ways antichinismo was embedded within Mexico's revolutionary national state and its ideologies."
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101 Ways to Research Your Family Tree for Free

101 Ways to Research Your Family Tree for Free | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Explore one hundred of the best free genealogy sites and free surname search sites online for your ancestors.
John Jung's insight:
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Why the UK Must Teach More Chinese History

Why the UK Must Teach More Chinese History | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Tom Harper University of Surrey The Sovietologist E.H. Carr once asked “what is history?” in his book of the same name. It is a question that may need to be asked again in light of plans by Oxford …
John Jung's insight:
"In sum, by studying China’s past, we can move beyond the Eurocentric discourse that has become ever more limited in recent years. The ‘common knowledge’ of UK Higher Education that has long been deemed to be ‘universal is far too Eurocentric in nature focusing upon the experiences of the European powers and the Americas. While these lessons are important, they alone are not sufficient in exploring a turbulent world order where Asia is playing an increasingly prominent role. The experiences of China will likely gain the same tractions as those of the European powers of the previous two centuries."

The value of viewing history between UK and China from China's perspective is every bit as important as looking at China's view of the history of  China-U.S. relations.  
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Hsiung Shih-I   Playwright Lady Precious Stream

Hsiung Shih-I   Playwright Lady Precious Stream | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
John Jung's insight:
 S. I. Hsuing was the first Chinese to direct a play in London's West End with his "Lady Precious Stream"  at the Little Theatre in John Street, London, by the People's National Theatre in 1935, directed by Nancy Price and Hsiung, and ran for 1,000 nights.[5] The play was also later performed on Broadway at the Booth Theatre in New York, produced by Morris Gest.[6] It was adapted for television in 1950.[7]

Here is an excerpt from an analysis of the play I found at this site


"...the play is more of a romantic, and partly comic, domestic drama than a martial piece. Precious Stream is the third daughter of the Wang family and shocks her parents and sisters by falling in love with, and ultimately marrying, the gardener Xue, who is of humble origin. In this take of love treachery, fidelity and reconciliation, Precious Stream shows her devotion to the noble Xue who is elevated to a senior position in the army fighting the rebel forces opposed to the Tang emperor. "

Xue is captured by the enemy forces and, to save his own life, is forced to marry the rebel queen. Xue is placed in a terrible dilemma but his love for Precious Stream remains strong, and he attempts to find a way out of his impasse, while his loyal wife remains constant and hopes for his return. Audiences at the time were captivated by the specially prepared Chinese curtain and backdrop, as well as by the dazzling costumes, designed by the great Chinese Opera performer Mei Lanfang.

The staging is minimal, with few props, and the performance is unconventional for Western audiences.

Not much could be found about Hsiung's later work or whether Lady Precious Stream had any performances elsewhere.

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A Parallel Between Documentary Editing and Concussion Evaluation.

A Parallel Between Documentary Editing and Concussion Evaluation. | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Even in a fractious era, the filmmaker still believes that his documentaries can bring every viewer in.
John Jung's insight:
In a recent New Yorker magazine article, writer Ian Parker discussed the latest documentary, The Vietnam War, by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick, and also profiles the career and life of Burns.  

Although it has little or nothing to do directly with the Vietnam War film, a general discussion of editorial judgment of film making was raised well past the halfway point of a lengthy article.  Asked whether  it is legitimate to include 'misleading' images if it serves to illustrate a point Burns is making, he cited an anecdote involving legendary University of Arkansas football coach, Frank Broyles, about how he dealt with players who may have suffered a concussion in a game.

"Broyles explained that coaches tend to gauge the seriousness of an injury by asking a player his name or the time of day; if he can’t answer correctly, it’s serious. As Burns recalled it, Broyles went on, “But, of course, if the player is important to the game, we tell him what his name is, we tell him what time it is, and we send him back in.” This method came to be dubbed "Broyles Law," and is parallel to what might be called the "Ken Burns law" of editing, but not to be confused with the well-known "Ken Burns effect" of panning still photographs to give the illusion of a movie.
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Pre-1958 Chinese Collection (Asian Reading Room: Library of Congress)

Pre-1958 Chinese Collection (Asian Reading Room: Library of Congress) | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
An overview of the pre-1958 Chinese Collection in the Asian Division at the Library of Congress.
John Jung's insight:
This link is a guide to the recently digitized Chinese collection at the Library of Congress is now available.online.  
Complex, and takes effort to learn to navigate so the Asian Division of the Library provided this research guide for the Pre-1958 Chinese Collection. It offers a detailed overview of the diverse types of materials found in the collection and helps readers to navigate the rich body of texts it contains.

"The contents of the Asian Division’s Pre-1958 Chinese Collection, totaling more than 40,000 items, are now fully searchable through the Library’s online catalog in both Chinese characters and Romanized script.... Around 23,000 of the works in the collection—including 5,300 titles designated as rare books—were created before 1911, when the rule of China’s final imperial dynasty ended. Among these works are rare Song and Yuan dynasty editions (960–1368), including 11  Buddhist sutras and 6,000 volumes of Chinese and Tibetan works donated in 1915."
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Who 'owns' an ethnic cuisine?: The Appropriation Conversation

Who 'owns' an ethnic cuisine?: The Appropriation Conversation | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
The implications of culinary appropriation are both concrete and abstract. They warrant informed analysis.
John Jung's insight:
Culinary appropriation refers to 'outsiders' cooking the foods of another culture.  The Southern Food Alliance (SFA) provides links to diverse views on this topic.  
As SFA notes, 
"...who cooks the cuisines of other cultures is not new, and the lines between appreciation and appropriation, between trend and tradition, are fuzzy at best. The implications of culinary appropriation are both concrete (who benefits financially from selling other cultures’ foods?) and abstract (what do culinary representations of other cultures teach about those communities and their place in American culture?)." 
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