Educational Studies
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Rescooped by Madison R from Kenya School Report - 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Want to become a teacher? You must score high grades

Want to become a teacher? You must score high grades | Educational Studies | Scoop.it
It will no longer be as easy as ABC to become a teacher, if new regulations are effected. Plans are underway to raise the entry grades to teachers training colleges to C+ and have teachers specialise in specific subject areas.

Via Abraham Tumuti
Madison R's insight:

My thoughts; it’s good that teachers are going to be held more accountable for their teaching. I also think its time that factors, such as seniority, no longer decide who gets to keep their job and who doesn’t. Some of the most amazing teachers I’ve ever had were young and inexperienced, while some of the lesser teachers I’ve had had years and years of experience; however that’s not always true. I like the idea of having teachers take tests in their own subjects every now and then just to check up on their skills, and for a quality teacher, the tests shouldn’t be a problem at all. I also think this was good motivation for me, especially the opener that says that becoming a teacher will no longer happen if you only get Cs or worse in school. My dad is a teacher and he never had the best grades in high school, or even college, so it kind of gave me the mentality that becoming a teacher isn’t that hard, but it really should be hard so that only the best get through. Teachers deserve way more credit than they are getting, but that also means that only the teachers that actually help students should be allowed to continue to be teachers. 

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Rescooped by Madison R from Information and digital literacy in education via the digital path
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5 Things You Should Know About Personalized Learning

5 Things You Should Know About Personalized Learning | Educational Studies | Scoop.it
How schools and colleges are tapping into characteristics that make each student unique.

Via Elizabeth E Charles
Madison R's insight:

My thoughts; this article was actually pretty informative and interesting. I really connected with some of the ideas that they proposed. For example, they make a comment on how a student may be awful at physics, but amazing at skateboarding, so the teacher should somehow apply physics to skating so the student can understand physics. I thought this was an extremely relatable idea because I’m currently clueless in physics, but really enjoy playing sports. Maybe if teachers applied what we’re learning to what we’re interested in, we’ll understand and care more about the material. Additionally, I think that a lot of students, atJacksonat least, would appreciate a more personalized education. I make this assumption because I hang out with students all day, everyday, and see what they post on social medias and there seems to be a general consensus of being unhappy with our current education system. I think a lot of students feel left behind, or like it wouldn’t matter if they failed a test or a class because no one really cares about their education, which hopefully isn’t true. My thought is that if a teacher focused on getting to know their students the students would feel a greater responsibility to try their hardest in class, which is important and beneficial to us. Finally, I like the idea of more personalized learning and teaching, but I’m a bit confused on how it would work. I can’t imagine a teacher being able to reach all of their 300 college students personally. I guess this is something I should look into more- since I want to be a teacher when I’m older I’d like to know the best ways to connect with students and help them reach their potential. 

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Rescooped by Madison R from Information and digital literacy in education via the digital path
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Education Is a Becoming Process | Isa Adney

Education Is a Becoming Process | Isa Adney | Educational Studies | Scoop.it
How do you measure who someone has become after an education, a class, a teacher, a degree? How do you measure hope, trust, citizenship, critical thinking, art, respect, self-esteem, or a desire for growth and contribution?...

Via Elizabeth E Charles
Madison R's insight:

My thoughts; I really like the idea that education is a “becoming”; becoming of a person that can succeed and be happy in the real world. I also agree with the article in that they explain how tests are not always the best way to assess if someone has learned or grown. A true and good education should teach one how to be a better person and how to succeed in their life, and both those things cannot be measured on a test because they take a lifetime to achieve. Additionally, I really enjoyed how the author gives an anecdote of when a teacher of hers helped her “become”, though she realized what she had become long after she was in school. I want to be able to look back at my high school and college years when I’m 30 and see who helped me become a better or successful person. I also want to be the kind of teacher who my students look back at when they’re older and successful.  Overall, the article made me more excited to be a teacher eventually because I want to be able to make a difference in the lives and future lives of my students. 

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