Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
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Success Story: Anthony Hopkins | DyslexiaHelp at the University of Michigan

Success Story: Anthony Hopkins | DyslexiaHelp at the University of Michigan | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Today's Success Story: Anthony Hopkins http://t.co/OlNrzoMa #dyslexia...

Sir Anthony Hopkins is considered to be one of the greatest living actors. But how was he able to win an Oscar, two Emmys, and the Cecil B. DeMille Award for Lifetime Achievement? Hopkins credits his dyslexia for his interest in acting.

Growing up, he preferred painting and playing the piano—-which he continues to do as an adult—-and didn’t enjoy his time in school.

“I was lousy in school,” Hopkins said in an interview. “I was antisocial and didn’t bother with the other kids… I didn’t know what I was doing there. That’s why I became an actor.”

His success spans from his Oscar-winning role as Hannibal Lecter in The Silence of the Lambs, the title role in The Mask of Zorro, his performance as President John Quincy Adams in Amistad, and much more.

To see Hopkins talk about his dyslexia, fast forward to the 14:40-minute mark in this hour-long interview.

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Fox News RPT: 5 questions to ask before starting your child on ADHD medication

Fox News RPT: 5 questions to ask before starting your child on ADHD medication | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Stimulant medications like Ritalin and Adderall are the most common type of medications used to treat ADHD and are up to 80 percent effective in helping to increase attention, decrease impulsivity, hyperactivity, and disruptive and aggressive behaviors. “It turns down the volume on those types of behaviors,” according to Dr. Susan Ashley, author of 1000 Best Tips for ADHD: Expert Answers and Bright Advice to Help You and Your Child.
Concerta, Ritalin LA, and Vyvanse are also stimulant medications but are taken once a day and last for up to 12 hours. Insomnia is the most common side effect, with children having trouble falling asleep and waking up in the morning, and feeling irritable.
Non-stimulant medications like Strattera take 4 to 6 weeks to start working and have to build up in the body so it can work longer than some of the stimulant options. The FDA issued a public health advisory in 2005 about the increased risk of suicidal thoughts within the first few months of using Strattera. And although the non-stimulants have fewer side effects, they are not as effective in some children.
Antidepressants, although not FDA-approved for ADHD, and antihypertensives, which are actually blood pressure medications, are also prescribed. Since there is not enough research about long term side effects of some of these medications, Ashley said it’s important to weigh the benefits and risks. “Maybe your kids can behave better but what’s the cost?”

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/08/15/5-questions-to-ask-before-starting-your-child-on-adhd-medication/?utm_source=LDOnLine.org&utm_medium=Headlines#ixzz24KbLbO4D

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San Jose USD Selects Lexia Reading to Meet Early Literacy Goals ... - Virtual-Strategy Magazine

San Jose USD Selects Lexia Reading to Meet Early Literacy Goals  ... - Virtual-Strategy Magazine | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Lexia Reading’s distinctive and cost-effective technology offers a scalable, research-proven approach that provides educators norm-referenced measures that prioritize the students who are the most at-risk, and recommends teacher-led, direct skill instruction to address specific skill gaps. As students work independently on Lexia Reading, they receive explicit, systematic and structured practice on foundational reading skills. The fun, engaging software provides scaffolded learning, advancing students to higher levels as they demonstrate proficiency. Each of the age-appropriate, skill-specific activities in Lexia Reading conforms to federal guidelines and is aligned to the Common Core State Standards.

Read more at http://www.virtual-strategy.com/2012/08/21/san-jose-usd-selects-lexia-reading-meet-early-literacy-goals-all-elementary-schools-distr?page=0,0#4l4JPE7GtkRdbLC0.99

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The Marshall Memo - A Weekly Roundup of Important Ideas and Research in K-12 Education

Educational research newsletter based in Boston with subscribers nationwide. The Marshall Memo, published since 2003, is designed to keep principals, teachers, superintendents, and others very well-informed on current research and best practices in the field. Kim Marshall, drawing on his experience as a teacher, principal, central office administrator, consultant, and writer, lightens the load of busy educators by serving as their "designated reader."

To produce the Marshall Memo, Kim subscribes to 44 carefully-chosen publications and looks through scores of articles each week to select 5-10 that have the greatest potential to improve teaching, leadership, and learning. He then writes a brief summary of each article, provides e-links to full articles when available, highlights a few striking quotes, and e-mails the Memo to subscribers every Monday (with the exception of a one-week break at Christmas and a two-week mid-summer vacation).

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Dynaread Adds Public Dyslexia Library to help dyslexic students access library materials. |

Dynaread Adds  Public Dyslexia Library to help dyslexic students access library materials. | | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Dyslexia program adds Text-to-Speech technology to help dyslexic students access library materials. |

 

 Dynaread Special Education Corporation offers an extensive online dyslexia library for free public use https://dynaread.com/service/. The Dynaread library offers articles and videos about dyslexia and related learning disabilities. The latest addition to the Dynaread library is the Ivona text-to-speech technology which allows people not only to read, but also to listen to all the articles in the online library.

Most of the entries in the library are in article format. This proved to be a problem for some of the parents and teacher of students using Dynaread. Dyslexia has a genetic link. Many parents of children who have dyslexia struggle with reading themselves. This makes it difficult for some of the them to accurately read articles. The solution? Implementing state-of-the-art Ivona iWebReader text-to-speech technology to the site. Now parents and teachers can listen to all the articles, making the Dynaread library much more accessible for those who struggle with reading.

Joy Dekkers, Dynaread COO:”It is so difficult to find quality dyslexia information on the web today. Websites offering good information on this topic are scarce. Many of the ones that do offer useful information are not always organized in an orderly and accessible fashion, making them hard to search.”

Dynaread offers science-based Learn-to-read remediation specifically designed for older struggling readers (age 7+). The Dynaread library forms an extension to the educational services Dynaread. Dynaread curriculum users kept coming back with dyslexia related questions.

 

Read more at

 

http://www.virtual-strategy.com/2012/08/20/dynaread-adds-exciting-new-feature-public-dyslexia-library#ItfbgURT7geVOxsv.99

 

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Audiobooks Help Kids Learn: Learning Ally ;access to 75,000 audio textbooks & popular literature titles

Audiobooks Help Kids Learn: Learning Ally ;access to 75,000 audio textbooks & popular literature titles | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Studies have shown that audiobooks are remarkably effective for many students with reading-based disabilities. The benefits of auditory learning include increased comprehension, better grades, higher confidence and improved self-esteem. The leading resource for these students is Learning Ally, a nonprofit organization that offers the world’s most advanced library of audio textbooks for at-home and in-the-classroom reading.

Audiobook Apps Go Mainstream

Learning Ally offers instant access to more than 75,000 audio textbooks and popular literature titles—nearly everything required for kindergarten through high school and beyond. The audiobooks can be easily loaded to devices that kids use in everyday life—like iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, as well as their laptops.

Educators applaud the independence that new mainstream technology gives to their students. “Kids with learning differences want to be part of the crowd, and they don’t want to be dependent on having mom or dad read their books to them,” says Ruth W., an educational therapist inCalifornia. “Now they can just put their earbuds on, read with Learning Ally’s free audio app on their iPhone, and blend in with their friends—which, especially in the teen years, is a huge consideration.”

Proven Help for Dyslexia

With the help of Learning Ally audiobooks, thousands of young people across theU.S.are enjoying newfound success in the classroom. Dyslexic student Kara S. has come a long way from the “slow reading table” she was forced to sit at in elementary school. She recently graduated from theUniversityofSan Franciscowith a double major in physics and math.

“Parental support could only go so far,” Kara says. “I needed something more.” She credits her membership with Learning Ally as the key to igniting her passion for learning and increasing her confidence as a reader and student.

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Dyslexic Man Acts as Papa Bear to Cubs: Naturalist and Author Ben Kilham

Dyslexic Man Acts as Papa Bear to Cubs:  Naturalist and Author Ben Kilham | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"I learned from reality." - Ben Kilham, National Geographic wild bear expert

 

Ben Kilham has been the focus of three National Geographic speciali and countless other national programs because of his expertise with a tricky problem - how to raise orphan bears who will ultimately be able to return to the wild.

 

Excerpt:

 

"Kilham’s work shed light on various aspects of bear behavior. For example, he noted that bears live in a highly developed social structure with complex trading systems, have the ability to make judgments and instill punishment. This is important as bear encounters with humans increase due to the expansion of the bear population and the decrease in their natural habitat because of development.

 

Eric Orff, a retired wildlife biologist with the state Fish and Game Department, said Kilham is “a brilliant man” with a unique “powers of observation.” Not only does he have rare of access, but “He connects things that most of us wouldn’t. His work has contributed to a change in view of bears as a beast… (and) ferocious stalkers.” Ed Gray, the founding editor Gray’s Sporting Journal, who also assisted Kilham in writing his book added, “He’s doing very serious work and is on the cutting edge of the social structure of black bears. He understands it better than any scientist.”

 

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Literacies - multiple literacies

Literacies - multiple literacies | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The theory of multiple intelligence was developed in 1983 by Dr. Howard Gardner, professor of education at Harvard University. It suggests that the traditional notion of intelligence, based on I.Q. testing, is far too limited. Instead, Dr. Gardner proposes eight different intelligences to account for a broad range of human potential in children and adults.*


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TED Blog | The World Peace Game: John Hunter on TED.com

TED Blog | The World Peace Game: John Hunter on TED.com | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

John Hunter puts all the problems of the world on a 4′x5′ plywood board — and lets his 4th-graders solve them. At TED2011, he explains how his World Peace Game engages schoolkids, and why the complex lessons it teaches — spontaneous, and always surprising — go further than classroom lectures can. (Recorded at TED2011, March 2011, in Long Beach, CA. Duration: 20:28)

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12 Questions to Ask About a College's Disability Services | The ...

12 Questions to Ask About a College's Disability Services | The ... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 

Like other college-bound students, those with learning differences or ADHD should make a point of visiting colleges before applying. However, in addition to visiting the admissions office, these students should also make a beeline to the Office of Disability Services to look for another type of match: support services with the appropriate accommodations for their needs.

Although all colleges are required by law to offer support services and accommodations, the level of support and types of accommodations available to students with learning differences varies widely from campus to campus, ranging from basic to comprehensive.

A visit to the Office of Disability Services is an opportunity to ask about the availability of support and accommodations that will help the student be successful in college by putting him or her on a level playing field with peers.

 

Here are important questions to ask:

 

How current must my testing be to to apply for accommodations?

How many students use your services?
What Assistive Technology (AT) services do you offer? Do you have an AT expert on staff?
What accommodations do you offer? What are the procedures and timelines to receive them?
How many Disabilities Support counselors do you have on your staff? Do they act as liasions?
If a professor is not in compliance regarding the student’s needed accommodations, how is the situation resolved?
What is the procedure to get extended time on exams? How much notice is required? Do students arrange extended time with professors or through the Disabilities Services Office?
Where do students take exams? Who proctors?
What do you consider the most difficult majors/classes for Disabilities Support students on this campus?
Will I have both an advisor in the Disabilities Services Office and a regular academic advisor? If both, how will the two advisors work with each other?
What is the four-year graduation rate for students with learning disabilities similar to mine?
Do you track students who have used your services after graduation? If so, what do your findings show about their success after graduation?

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Real A, Rapper DJ talks to 3 time Wrld Champ. Formula 1 driver,Sir Jackie Stewart about dyslexia-

Real A, Rapper DJ talks to 3 time Wrld Champ. Formula 1 driver,Sir Jackie Stewart about dyslexia- | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Real A, Rapper DJ, had a once in a lifetime opportunity to interview the legendary Scottish three-time world Formula One racing driver, Sir Jackie Stewart, President of Dyslexia Scotland, and ask him about his own personal ...

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Livescribe Echo smartpen can help students take notes in class so they never miss a word.

Livescribe Echo smartpen can help students take notes in class so they never miss a word. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

We're very excited that Livescribe was featured today on CNET's How-To blog! CNET demonstrated all the ways the Livescribe Echo smartpen can help students when taking notes in class so they never miss a word.


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Videos Suggested for Back to School Faculty Meetings and other educational audiences

Videos Suggested for Back to School Faculty Meetings and other educational audiences | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

By Jonathan Martin

 

"This post could be almost infinite: there is most certainly an extraordinary array of options for videos which expand educators’ understandings and inspire advances in 21st century learning. But curation is about choice and selection, and while I know I will leave out many, I thought I’d offer up a set of 15 of my favorites for your consideration for video screening at at back-to-school or beginning-of-the-year faculty meetings (and/or parent and board meetings).

 

"I’ve starred those that might also serve as useful and engaging videos to share with students at back to school or other assemblies.

 

"I am sure every reader will have their own opinions about the videos I’ve left off this list, and please: add them below using the comment box, or, post yourself your own set and share the link from this post to your own."

 

A wonderful list. You are sure to find something valuable here. -JL


Via Jim Lerman, Dennis T OConnor, mjonesED, Tom Perran
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Early anesthesia tied to language problems in kids - Fox News

Early anesthesia tied to language problems in kids - Fox News | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

kids who'd had anesthesia were about twice as likely to show signs of language disabilities and 70 percent more likely to have reasoning problems than the non-anesthesia group.
The researchers counted a "disability" as a score in the seventh percentile or lower on the standardized tests.
Studies in baby animals have shown that anesthesia can cause some brain cells to die and may affect the formation of circuits that other neurons use to communicate. But it's still not clear whether that also happens in kids' brains, researchers noted.
Based on the new study, it's difficult to say if the average difference in learning and reasoning between the two groups is one that a parent or teacher would notice in the average child, Warner said.
Still, he added that combined with other research linking multiple rounds of anesthesia with learning disabilities and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, the effect "may in fact be clinically significant."
What this study adds, Warner pointed out, is that even kids who underwent anesthesia only once when they were very young still had more trouble later on.
Nonetheless, "Our results do not mean that children should not have surgery if it's needed," Ing told Reuters Health.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/08/20/early-anesthesia-tied-to-language-problems-in-kids/#ixzz24KcU9SkK

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Early Childhood Anesthesia Carries Risks: language, cognitive function, motor skills and behavior.

Early Childhood Anesthesia Carries Risks: language, cognitive function, motor skills and behavior. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

American Academy of Pediatrics study of 2,608 children in Australia, 321 of whom were exposed to anesthesia before the age of 3 and 2,287 who were unexposed before age 3 was conducted to determine the association between exposure to anesthesia in children and outcomes in language, cognitive function, motor skills and behavior at age 10. The study, “Long-term Differences in Language and Cognitive Function After Childhood Exposure to Anesthesia,” in the September 2012 issue of Pediatrics (published online August 20) found that children exposed to anesthesia before age 3 have an increased risk for long-term deficits in receptive and expressive language and abstract reasoning at age 10. Even a single exposure was associated with increased risk. The authors noted that this study differs from others studies through the use of directly administered neuropsychological assessments. Past studies have relied on academic scores, standardized test results, medical records, and parent and teacher surveys. The assessments used in this study, however, may be more sensitive than those used in prior studies and as a result, able to detect subtle differences in specific neuropsychological domains.

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3 min news cast: Marburn Academy For Kids With ADHD, Dyslexia in central OH Boasts Record Enrollment ...

3 min news cast: Marburn Academy  For Kids With ADHD, Dyslexia in central OH Boasts Record Enrollment ... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Marburn began the 2012 school year enrollment at an all-time high. While 170 students doesn't seem like a large number, it is to school that specializes in helping students with learning disabilities, specifically Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Dyslexia, students like Alexandra.

"Our teaching is built on a foundation of understanding what it is that's different about the way this child learns. Then our skill is having teachers trained in how to teach that way," explained Headmaster Earl Oremus.

Oremus said they are most excited about the growth in the high school grades. Nine years ago they had just 18 students enrolled. This year there are 50 students in grades 9-12. To accommodate the growth, the library was converted into classrooms and construction crews are working on adding modular units.

Marburn's success educating students with ADHD and dyslexia can be seen in their graduation rate. All students receive a diploma and go on to college.

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TY @PatBassett for Three creative geniuses explain why they hated school

TY @PatBassett for Three creative geniuses explain why they hated school | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Three creative geniuses explain why they hated formal education.

In Einstein’s own words:

“. . . I worked most of the time in the physical laboratory [at the Polytechnic Institute of Zürich], fascinated by the direct contact with experience. The balance of the time I used in the main in order to study at home the works of Kirchoff, Helmholtz, Hertz, etc. . . . In [physics], however, I soon learned to scent out that which was able to lead to fundamentals and to turn aside from everything else, from the multitude of things which clutter up the mind and divert it from the essential. The hitch in this was, of course, the fact that one had to cram all this stuff into one's mind for the examinations, whether one liked it or not. This coercion had such a deterring effect [upon me] that, after I had passed the final examination, I found the consideration of any scientific problems distasteful to me for an entire year.

It is, in fact, nothing short of a miracle that the modern methods of instruction have not yet entirely strangled the holy curiosity of inquiry; for this delicate little plant, aside from stimulation, stands mainly in need of freedom; without this it goes to wreck and ruin without fail. It is a very grave mistake to think that the enjoyment of seeing and searching can be promoted by means of coercion and a sense of duty..."

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In Rhode Island, Reinventing Summer School to Prevent Kids' Learning Loss | PBS NewsHour | Aug. 20, 2012

In Rhode Island, Reinventing Summer School to Prevent Kids' Learning Loss | PBS NewsHour | Aug. 20, 2012 | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

In Providence, R.I., the Summer Scholars Program has reinvented summer school by taking lower income students out of the classroom and putting them "into the field." John Merrow reports on how the new approach gets students to practice skills they struggled with during the past year and prevent additional learning loss for fall.

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Is the Future of tenure a thing of the past? NYT: Nearly Half the Teachers in NYC Denied Tenure in 2012

Is the Future of tenure a thing of the past? NYT: Nearly Half the Teachers in NYC Denied Tenure in 2012 | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"Only 55 percent of eligible teachers, having worked for at least three years, earned tenure in 2012, compared with 97 percent in 2007.

An additional 42 percent this year were kept on probation for another year, and 3 percent were denied tenure and fired. Of those whose probations were extended last year, fewer than half won tenure this year, a third were given yet another year to prove themselves, and 16 percent were denied tenure or resigned.

The totals reflect a reversal in the way tenure is granted not only in New York City but around the country. While tenure was once considered nearly automatic, it has now become something teachers have to earn.

A combination of factors — the education reform movement, slow economies that have pinched spending for new teachers, and federal grant competitions like Race to the Top that encourage states to change their policies — have led lawmakers to tighten the requirements not only for earning tenure, but for keeping it.

Idaho last year did away with tenure entirely by passing a law giving newly hired teachers no expectation of a contract renewal from one year to the next. In Florida, all newly hired teachers now must earn an annual contract, with renewals based upon their performance........"

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"I am dyslexic. I am also a writer with a PhD in English literature..."

"I am dyslexic. I am also a writer with a PhD in English literature..." | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"I am dyslexic. I am also a writer with a PhD in English literature...I had overheard senior figures in the university asserting that there are no dyslexics at Oxford...Having completed my doctoral research, I decided to find out more about dyslexia in the graduate community, and I discovered that there are many dyslexic students undertaking graduate work in universities across the UK, at both masters and doctoral levels. I have met dyslexic graduates who are doing research across a range of subjects, including English literature, theology, history of art, business studies, real estate management and anthropology. I have also met a number of dyslexic undergraduates who are going on to do masters in sociology, music therapy, business studies and English literature."

 

"One of the most frustrating things about being dyslexic in the graduate community is that most people do not understand that my academic strengths are drawn from the same place, as it were, as my weaknesses. The strengths of my doctoral thesis were born out of my lateral thinking abilities and visual perceptiveness, which are typical strengths in the pattern of cognitive strengths and weaknesses that characterises dyslexia. My thesis looked at the relationship between image and text in early 20th-century New York newspapers. My visual and three-dimensional way of thinking enabled me to produce original insights into the symbiotic relationship between 20th-century urban development and the growth of newspapers..." - Rebecca Loncraine, PhD

 

Dr. Loncraine is a freelance writer who also recently wrote a popular biography on Frank Baum, author of The Wizard of Oz.

 

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The 10 Biggest Ways Emotions Affect Learning | Edudemic

The 10 Biggest Ways Emotions Affect Learning | Edudemic | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

One of the more popular studies regarding interplay between education and emotion, from MIT, reminds teachers that the feelings impacting learning do not exist as one solid, nebulous mass. Rather, they sit on five different spectrums, each of which factor into their overall performance. Anxiety-Confidence, Boredom-Fascination, Frustration-Euphoria, Dispirited-Encouraged, and Terror-Enchantment all hold sway in their own unique ways, and savvy teachers would do well to recognize their respective roles in shaping the process.

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What can athletes with ADHD teach us about the condition? - The Guardian

What can athletes with ADHD teach us about the condition? - The Guardian | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The GuardianWhat can athletes with ADHD teach us about the condition?The GuardianExpelled from three schools and placed in a psychiatric unit aged 11 because his mother was unable to cope, McKenzie also served time in a young offenders' institute.

Athletes like Phelps and McKenzie do not, however, have special powers via their condition. Bilbow believes it is actually significantly harder for people with ADHD to become elite athletes. "Having ADHD doesn't mean you're going to be a great sportsperson," she says. "Your ADHD isn't going to get you there, it's hard work that will. ADHD is not a contributor towards success but equally it is not a barrier to success."

People with ADHD, which is a developmental disorder, may find they have poor problem-solving skills, and struggle with timekeeping, and organising and motivating themselves, explains Bilbow. This may suggest that adapting to the discipline demanded by athletic training is tough for those with ADHD and yet Bilbow believes many with the condition find sport gives them the kind of immediate rewards and sense of achievement they need to build confidence and resilience.

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Audiobooks Help Kids Learn

Audiobooks Help Kids Learn | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

(NAPSI)—With school back in session, there is good news for millions
of students who have difficulty reading because of dyslexia or other learning
disabilities. For these young people who struggle to understand the printed
word, there is a proven alternative: They can listen to their textbooks and
enjoy academic success.

Studies have shown that audiobooks are remarkably effective for many
students with reading-based disabilities. The benefits of auditory learning
include increased comprehension, better grades, higher confidence and
improved self-esteem. The leading resource for these students is Learning
Ally, a nonprofit organization that offers the world’s most advanced
library of audio textbooks for at-home and in-the-classroom reading.

Audiobook Apps Go Mainstream

Learning Ally offers instant access to more than 75,000 audio textbooks
and popular literature titles—nearly everything required for kindergarten
through high school and beyond. The audiobooks can be easily loaded to
devices that kids use in everyday life—like iPhone, iPad and iPod
touch, as well as their laptops.

 

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Back-to-School Kit for Parents of Students with LD

Back-to-School Kit for Parents of  Students with LD | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Learning the essential skills to become your child’s advocate and ensure your child receives an appropriate education does not require lots of money or even years of schooling. All it requires is learning five basic skills and consistently implementing them within the school community.

This e-book will cover the following topics:

• Building a Good Relationship with Your Child’s Teacher

• Essential Skills for Becoming Your Child’s Advocate

• Advocating for your School-Aged Child

• Making the Most of Your Parent-Teacher Conference

• Creating Great Expectations for an Effective Meeting” worksheet

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5 Must-Know Tips For Deploying iPads In Your Classroom | Edudemic

5 Must-Know Tips For Deploying iPads In Your Classroom | Edudemic | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

If you're looking to deploy iPads in education, you may think that it's just a matter of expense and storage. Those things are big, but they're not the biggest problems you'll face.

 

"I  was chatting with an Edudemic reader this week who wanted to know a few tips and tricks about deploying iPads in his classroom this coming school year. I figured it might be helpful to share the results of this conversation with the rest of the Edudemic readers. After all, this site is all about sharing and learning together.

How many devices can use one Apple ID?
This is a question that pops up all the time. But no one seems to mention it! They just talk about how snazzy iCloud is or how easy it is to do XYZ.

But long story short, you can only have ten (10) devices per Apple ID. That means you’ll need 3 separate Apple IDs to deploy a classroom of up to 30 iPads. Want to use some iPads and some iPod Touches? Each counts as a device......."

 


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