Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Dyslexia Guidance for Managers and Employers: Dyslexia in the workplace | Think ...

Dyslexia Guidance for Managers and Employers: Dyslexia in the workplace | Think ... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
A new book published by the British Dyslexia Association aims to shed light on this 'learning difference' and helps managers & employers on their road to supporting dyslexic employees. 

Dyslexia does not discriminate. It affects people of all ‘abilities’ – and there are countless literate dyslexics across all professions; lawyers, teachers, engineers, police, nurses …….this learning difference is everywhere.

In my experience very few employers understand the obligations placed on them by the Disability Discrimination Act (now replaced by the Equality Act) and that aside I think most people would agree – getting the best out of all employees makes good business sense.

This latest publication on the subject is commended by Dr Sylvia Moody a professional much respected in this field and I believe is a ‘must read’ for managers.

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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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The media exaggerates negative news. This distortion has consequences | @sapinker @cdcowen @guardianscience @NAISnetwork @lawrenceschool 

The media exaggerates negative news. This distortion has consequences | @sapinker @cdcowen @guardianscience @NAISnetwork @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The nature of news is likely to distort people’s view of the world because of a mental bug that the psychologists Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman called the Availability heuristic: people estimate the probability of an event or the frequency of a kind of thing by the ease with which instances come to mind. In many walks of life this is a serviceable rule of thumb. But whenever a memory turns up high in the result list of the mind’s search engine for reasons other than frequency—because it is recent, vivid, gory, distinctive, or upsetting—people will overestimate how likely it is in the world.

Plane crashes always make the news, but car crashes, which kill far more people, almost never do. Not surprisingly, many people have a fear of flying, but almost no one has a fear of driving. People rank tornadoes (which kill about 50 Americans a year) as a more common cause of death than asthma (which kills more than 4,000 Americans a year), presumably because tornadoes make for better television.
Lou Salza's insight:
There is so much good news in our schools! Remember those "bring your son or daughter to work days? How about a  "Bring your parents to school Day?" This would be a day when adults get to remind themselves about what is actually most important for the future of our communities, our country and our planet.
 If you have the privilege to be around young people in school as I do every day, it is possible to remain optimistic-- even upbeat --about the future and clear about priorities. Every day our young people by the millions get it right for themselves, for their peers for all of us. As educators and parents our challenge has always been to foster in the adult community the same ideals and values we espouse in our schools for student communities: Respect for self and others and willingness to step out of our comfort zones to learn new and challenging skills and concepts.It is our schools that plant and cultivate the seeds of academic, social and personal growth in our young people that gives rise to a future of positive civic engagement and strong democratic communities. Isn't it about time that adults (citizens, voters, politicians, businesses)  swallow the same medicine we have prescribed for our children? --Just sayin'--Lou
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Homework is wrecking our kids: The research is clear, let’s consider new policies & practice on homework - Salon.com @lawrenceschool @cdcowen 

Homework is wrecking our kids: The research is clear, let’s consider new policies & practice on homework - Salon.com @lawrenceschool @cdcowen  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
For elementary-aged children, research suggests that studying in class gets superior learning results, while extra schoolwork at home is just . . . extra work. Even in middle school, the relationship between homework and academic success is minimal at best. By the time kids reach high school, homework provides academic benefit, but only in moderation. More than two hours per night is the limit. After that amount, the benefits taper off. “The research is very clear,” agrees Etta Kralovec, education professor at the University of Arizona. “There’s no benefit at the elementary school level.”

Before going further, let’s dispel the myth that these research results are due to a handful of poorly constructed studies. In fact, it’s the opposite. Cooper compiled 120 studies in 1989 and another 60 studies in 2006. This comprehensive analysis of multiple research studies found no evidence of academic benefit at the elementary level. It did, however, find a negative impact on children’s attitudes toward school.
Lou Salza's insight:
At Lawrence we assign just enough homework to get kids over the trauma they and their families have been through at other schools. We "fire" parents from any role in homework, and we assign 5-30  minutes of mastered work for practice. Our students have much ground to cover due to the teaching disabilities they have encountered elsewhere. --Lou
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 Unlocking the Potential of the Data You Have @CarrollSchool @NAISnetwork @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @bnpowers @DDyslexiaMA @DyslexiaIDA ‏

 Unlocking the Potential of the Data You Have @CarrollSchool @NAISnetwork  @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @bnpowers @DDyslexiaMA @DyslexiaIDA ‏ | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Our mantra—our driving force—has become “Give each child what she or he most needs.” But to deliver on this lofty goal, we needed to understand deeply what exactly it is that a child most needs. And that meant having a means of making the child’s data useful for directing his or her educational program. This led us to create an interactive student information database that assigns cognitive development activities based on a student’s data profile. Sometimes the needs are obvious. When a child’s oral reading fluency score is more than a standard deviation below average, the response is to give the child more time with a teacher or tutor who can deliver high-quality reading instruction. But at other times, the needs are embedded and subtle. Why can’t this thoughtful child reveal the depth of her complex thinking in writing? Why doesn’t this great thinker know his multiplication facts? We shifted from wanting to understand what a student struggles with to understanding why a student struggles. This is a shift that heralds the arrival of more effective education. When education can identify and address the underlying causes of a child’s academic struggles, schools become lifesavers.
Lou Salza's insight:
Excellent article by Head of School Steve Wilkins at the Carroll School in Lincoln MA. W. Edwards Deming — 'In God we trust; all others bring data.'  
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The significant learning benefits of getting rid of grades @SusanDebraBlum @slooney @lawrenceschool @ISACSnews

The significant learning benefits of getting rid of grades @SusanDebraBlum @slooney @lawrenceschool @ISACSnews | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
For the last decade and a half, I’ve engaged in anthropological research on higher education, identifying several challenges and mismatches between what we know about learning “in real life” and learning in college. In my most recent book, “I Love Learning; I Hate School”: An Anthropology of College, I identified a number of ways that formal education has led to a lack of learning. Colleges promote credentials, obedience and the sorting of haves and have-nots, but not necessarily learning.
People kept asking me what I would do to improve things. And I said that if I could make one change, I would get rid of grades.
Lou Salza's insight:
Thoughtful. Insightful. Right.
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Lawrence Lower School Library Dedicated in Honor of Children's Author www.VanitaBooks.com @lawrenceschool #dyslexia

Lawrence Lower School Library Dedicated in Honor of Children's Author www.VanitaBooks.com @lawrenceschool #dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Childrens' author Vanita Oelschlager, who is also a Lawrence alumni grandmother, spent time with Lower School students on Oct. 25, sharing her wonderful collection of books.

One of her best-selling books, "Knees: The Mixed Up World of a Boy with Dyslexia" is actually dedicated to the students of Lawrence School.

As a part of the visit, the Lower School library was formally named the "James and Vanita Oelschlager Library" in appreciation of the couple's generous support of the school and Vanita's contributions to children's literature.
Lou Salza's insight:
As a children’s author, Vanita addresses topics of importance to children and parents and takes children and parents on a journey to identify and develop their strengths without allowing them to be completely defined by a problem or a struggle. In Vanita’s stories, labels inform—but do not define characters. Her illustrations are whimsical, her texts convey messages of hope, encouragement and resilience. At Lawrence we feel privileged to call her our friend. --Lou
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Experts lambaste French dyslexia study claiming to have found cause, cure @lawrenceschool @cdcowen #dyslexia

Experts lambaste French dyslexia study claiming to have found cause, cure @lawrenceschool @cdcowen #dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Siedenberg’s scathing blog post in Language Log heaped criticism onto the study, claiming it contained a remarkable number of errors, lack of information and poor science.

Several reasons he believes the study is substandard include:

Thirty students in each group is too few to make any kind of conclusion.
Basic information comparing the two groups was not provided – such as handedness, language background, nonverbal IQ measurements, measures of spoken language such as vocabulary comprehension.
There was no testing to determine that the students were actually dyslexic – they were only described as having poorer reading skills than one would expect.
Lou Salza's insight:
Dyslexics represent complex nuero-diversity. It is not a disease; therefore we seek is no "cure"!  Dyslexics have a print challenge and there are ways around and through those challenges that take time, practice and engagement of well prepared teachers, committed students and parents.  The are high standards for research design which so many so called "cures" and "treatments" for dyslexia consistently fail to meet. Simply toss this one out on the ash heap with the  'brain-SCAMS', colored lenses, visual training, 'Cog-MUD' and  so many other expensive, wasteful, inaccurate  treatments recommended for students who suffer from obsolete school and curriculum design. --Lou 
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How to Be a C.E.O., From a Decade’s Worth of Them

How to Be a C.E.O., From a Decade’s Worth of Them | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
People often try to crack the code for the best path to becoming a chief executive. Do finance people have an edge over marketers? How many international postings should you have? A variety of experiences is good, but at what point does breadth suggest a lack of focus?

It’s a natural impulse. In this age of Moneyball and big data, why not look for patterns?

The problem is that the world doesn’t really work that way. There are too many variables, many of them beyond your control, including luck, timing and personal chemistry.

The career trajectories of the C.E.O.s I’ve interviewed are so varied that spotting trends is difficult, and a surprising number of the executives do not fit the stereotype of the straight-A student and class president who seemed destined to run a big company someday. I’ve met C.E.O.s who started out in theater, music and teaching. Others had surprisingly low grades in school.
Lou Salza's insight:
Fascinating article about the complexity and diversity of effective leadership--Lou
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Why Audiobooks? - Diana Kennedy @lawrenceschool @benfoss @cdcowen @bnpowers

Why Audiobooks? - Diana Kennedy @lawrenceschool @benfoss @cdcowen @bnpowers | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Supporting this dyslexia-friendly understanding of reading is a burgeoning understanding of dyslexia itself as being not so much a “learning” disorder, as a “print” disorder.  As I have mentioned in previous posts,  Dr. David Rose points out that all learning disabilities are in truth a function of normal human neurodiversity in a specific context that fits badly.  In the case of dyslexia, the disability resides in part in the print.  Seen through this lens, audio books are a logical and easy piece of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), an approach focused on giving diverse learners access to content.
Lou Salza's insight:
Thank you Ben Foss for teaching us that there are 3 ways to read: eye,ear, and finger reading and that dyslexia is not a learning issue but an issue with print and written language.--Lou  
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Community Education Learning Differences: Neither a Gift nor a Curse:  A Conversation with Lou Salza in his Final Year as Head of @lawrenceschool

Community Education Learning Differences: Neither a Gift nor a Curse:  A Conversation with Lou Salza in his Final Year as Head of @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Parents of children with learning differences know that myths related to learning, memory and attention are prevalent and pervasive. This presentation is designed to: 

-Examine persistent learning myths that interfere in understanding children with learning differences 

-Discuss the benefits of leveraging strengths and affirming academic challenges 

-Provide framework for supporting the needs of children with learning differences, in and out of school.


Lou is the Head of School at Lawrence School in Northeast Ohio. Lawrence School serves students with language-based learning differences, such as dyslexia, and attention deficit disorders, like ADHD, in grades K-12. The school has two campus locations in Broadview Heights (grades K-6) and Sagamore Hills (grades 7-12).


Lou Salza's insight:
Parents of children with learning differences know that myths related to learning, memory and attention are prevalent and pervasive. This presentation is designed to: -Examine persistent learning myths that interfere in understanding children with learning differences -Discuss the benefits of leveraging strengths and affirming academic challenges -Provide framework for supporting the needs of children with learning differences, in and out of school. See you there!--Lou
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An evocative piece  by @AnnKlotz ‏ @CRGLaurelSchool  Looking for White Deer | Thread 

An evocative piece  by @AnnKlotz ‏ @CRGLaurelSchool  Looking for White Deer | Thread  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
When I was in fourth grade, I had to leave the science movie about a starving deer herd. As I sobbed in the company of the school secretary, she comforted me, murmuring that I was sensitive. Years later, I listened to a student explain that one deer fed his whole family for the weekend.  I relented slightly in the face of practicality and poverty, but I remain sensitive and deer-crazed.  Fawns represent hope. And white deer, my favorite, represent wonder.

In Native American culture, all-white animals of any species are considered sacred. For me, white deer feel inexplicable, exquisite. DNA or genetic mutations seem too rational an explanation for their beauty.  In the times I have been fortunate to see them, I’ve felt transformed, too, as if I have born witness to something rare, the way I felt when I held one of my babies in my arms for the very first time.  Awe and wonder.
Lou Salza's insight:
Anne is Headmistress of @CRGLaurelSchool a close friend and excellent colleague as well as a keen observer of the human condition.  -Lou
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Reimagine School: A Lawrence School Blog @lawrenceschool 

Reimagine School: A Lawrence School Blog @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The compass is a constant reminder of how, as a faculty, we are not only responsible for leading engaging and meaningful lessons in our classrooms, but shaping and developing young adults into kind and courageous humans.Traits such as compassion, advocacy, and integrity represent three of the eight qualities we aim to instill in our students when they leave our campus.


Lou Salza's insight:
The compass is a constant reminder of how, as a faculty, we are not only responsible for leading engaging and meaningful lessons in our classrooms, but shaping and developing young adults into kind and courageous humans.
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Assistive Technology to Help Students Succeed This Year @ATDyslexia @lawrenceschool

Assistive Technology to Help Students Succeed This Year @ATDyslexia @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Find out which assistive technology tools can address your child’s specific needs in this live expert chat.

Jamie Martin Assistive Technology Consultant and Trainer Thu Sep 07 at 12:00pm ET

Lou Salza's insight:
Jamie Martin Assistive Technology Consultant and Trainer 
 Thu Sep 07 at 12:00pm ET 
 Are you searching for the right assistive technology (AT) for your child? 
Join this expert chat with Jamie Martin, AT consultant and trainer, to find out which AT tools might address your child’s specific needs and challenges this year. 

 Simply go to live.understood.org at the time of the chat.
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Six Secrets to Private Schools' Success, and How Public Schools Can Steal Them @lawrenceschool 

Six Secrets to Private Schools' Success, and How Public Schools Can Steal Them @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In the end, there are fewer essential differences between public and private schools than one might expect. They are all ultimately teaching and learning communities. The best public school administrators already know how to create small pockets of flexibility for key initiatives like these, which are everyday practice at private schools. It is time for our districts and school boards to take note and help create more such opportunities.
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A ‘Mass Shooting Generation’ Cries Out for Change - @nytimes @cdcowen @NAISnetwork 

A ‘Mass Shooting Generation’ Cries Out for Change - @nytimes @cdcowen @NAISnetwork  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
At other high schools across the country, students rallied in solidarity with Stoneman Douglas High and staged walkouts to protest what they called Washington’s inaction in protecting students and teachers. A gun control advocacy group, Moms Demand Action, said it had been so overwhelmed with requests from students that it was setting up a parallel, student focused advocacy group.

“People say it’s too early to talk about it,” Mr. Kasky said. “If you ask me, it’s way too late.”

His argument reflects the words of other students who want action: The issue is not an abstraction to them. These are their murdered friends, their bloodstained schools, their upended lives.

Students said they did not want to cede the discussion over their lives to politicians and adult activists.

“We need to take it into our hands,” Mr. Kasky said.
Lou Salza's insight:
Voters and elected officials in every state take note! We cannot change what we are willing to tolerate.  We have created a generation of young people who have grown up with the deadly reality of school shootings.  This is not about our rights as sports enthusiasts, or our 2nd Amendment rights to carry firearms. This is about the fundamental rights of our children to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness in their schools. 
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Mitigating the Emotional Toll of Dyslexia @CityParentMag @cdcowen @lawrenceschool 

Mitigating the Emotional Toll of Dyslexia @CityParentMag @cdcowen @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Most adult dyslexics who share their personal stories mention that their feelings of shame created a significant barrier to living with dyslexia. That was certainly my case. Children fear to reveal to parents and teachers that they cannot read. If they don’t know they are dyslexic and don’t understand dyslexia’s many implications, they feel ashamed. Most think that they are stupid because they can’t keep up with their classmates in reading, writing, and spelling. Also, the challenges in memorizing things in sequence affect many aspects of learning and performance. Shame has a crippling effect—if we’re failing because we’re defective, and working harder hasn’t worked, we may feel like there’s no solution.

Dyslexic pupils were particularly vulnerable to negative reactions from parents, teachers, and peers. Most educational models value results, not effort, and when results are not forthcoming from the dyslexic student, most parents and educators express disapproval. The easiest thing for observers to conclude is that the student simply doesn’t care enough to do the hard work that will get the job done. Here’s the thing: character assassination rarely leads to an efficient support system.

Lou Salza's insight:
Important article for parents and teachers about how to support children through the challenges of feeling isolated and shamed about school failure and struggles due to dyslexia. 
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Reimagine School: A Lawrence School Blog

Reimagine School: A Lawrence School Blog | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
I asked students to talk to me about the terms “disability” versus “difference” with regard to the ways they learn. Not surprisingly, each rejected the term disability and shared that while they may work longer or harder, eventually they understand and feel good about their ability to master the tasks in front of them. They accept that there are things about themselves that will not change, but those challenges do not prevent them from learning and each felt those old labels would mean less the older they became. We discussed the difference between “growing out of a learning difference” versus “growing into it” and “learning how to cope with it.”

Lou Salza's insight:
I met with our six October Upper School Students of the Month this morning in his office. Their discussion proved to be a powerful reminder that Lawrence School is a place where students feel understood, respected, and are engaged in learning. Read our Lawrence School  blog here: https://tinyurl.com/yay7py7k
--Lou
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Reimagine School: Lawrence School Blog @lawrenceschool @Gyli_Matt_Nink 

Reimagine School: Lawrence School Blog @lawrenceschool @Gyli_Matt_Nink  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Facts about the condition of the planet and what we can do to reduce our ecological footprint and limit the amount of garbage being landfilled are taught with this multisensory approach in mind. By replacing the textbook cause-and-effect model with hands-on activities and projects, we enable our students to develop a deeper connection and sense of responsibility for the natural world.  

At the Upper School, several multisensory initiatives are in place to help students examine the relationship between humanity and the environment, and more will be added soon with the recent completion of our greenhouse facility.
Lou Salza's insight:
Ms. Nieves-Caraballo writes a thoughtful blog about the importance of "acting locally and thinking globally"! She advises Lawrence's Chapter of the Global Youth Leadership Institute (GYLI). Her  students built and currently maintain a compost system on the Upper School campus grounds.Kudos!-Lou
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6 College Students Share Accommodations That Help Them Succeed @lawrenceschool @cdcowen Succeed @E2ENational

6 College Students Share Accommodations That Help Them Succeed @lawrenceschool @cdcowen Succeed @E2ENational | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Colleges are required by law to provide accommodations to students who qualify. Here, six students in the Eye to Eye mentoring network share accommodations that helped them succeed in college. (Also, be sure to look at this list of college supports and services to see what else may be available.)
Lou Salza's insight:
Our own Macy! Lawrence High School '14! 
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How to Turn on Text to Speech on Your Mobile Device - YouTube @ATDyslexia @bnpowers @lawrenceschool @understoodOrg

Did you know that nearly every mobile device offers text-to-speech? In other words, your phone can actually read to you what’s displaying on the screen. For kids with reading issues, this can be extremely helpful in everything from doing research for school to browsing social media.

Watch as assistive technology expert Jamie Martin walks you through how to turn on text to speech on various mobile phones (both iPhone and Android). It’s much simpler than you may think!

Then learn more about text to speech and other assistive technology tools on Understood.org.
Lou Salza's insight:
I use my phone frequently to read or dictate! Thank you Jamie Martin for a clear 'how to' instructional video in 3 minutes!!--Lou 
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Head of School Announcement - Congratulations to Doug Hamilton! @lsalza @lawrenceschool 

Head of School Announcement - Congratulations to Doug Hamilton! @lsalza @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Dear Lawrence School Community,
 
On behalf of the Lawrence School Board of Trustees, it is with great pleasure that I announce the appointment of Douglas Hamilton as Lawrence School's next Head of School, effective July 1, 2018. The Board was unanimous in its support of the Search Committee's enthusiastic recommendation of Doug following an extensive and highly competitive search process that began last January.
Lou Salza's insight:
Congratulations to Doug Hamilton who is no stranger to the Lawrence community, having positively impacted countless students and families as an educator and administrator at the school for nearly three decades. He first joined the school's faculty in 1989 before being elevated to his current position as Director of Admission in 2000. During his time at Lawrence, Doug has developed a comprehensive understanding of learning differences, the needs of diverse learners, and our school curriculum. Additionally, as a member of the Lawrence Executive and Leadership councils, Doug has had an important voice in critical decisions that have led to our school's impressive progress in recent years.--Lou
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Reading to Rewire @janeachilders @cdcowen @lawrenceschool

Reading to Rewire @janeachilders @cdcowen @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Reading with parents and caregivers — key to building literacy skills and a love of reading in every child — may be particularly valuable for children at risk for developing dyslexia. New research reveals that strong home literacy practices may actually reshape the brains of such children by creating new neural pathways for reading. With family support, these children may be able to develop alternative networks that help them decode and comprehend words on a page.

The Research 
Dyslexia, the most common reading disability, affects between 5 and 10 percent of the population. It’s largely hereditary; about half of kids with a familial risk (an older sibling or parent with dyslexia) develop the disorder. The question for neuroscientist Nadine Gaab and her team at Boston Children’s Hospital is why do only 50 percent develop it — and are there ways to lessen that percentage even further?
Lou Salza's insight:
Reading aloud, at home, playing word and rhyming games; singing the alphabet song have been and remain the best way to build a foundation for literacy--Lou
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School Consortium Proposes a Better Transcript @slooney @lawrenceschool 

School Consortium Proposes a Better Transcript @slooney @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Scott Looney, head at the Hawken School in Cleveland since 2006, is an advocate for advanced student-centered and authentic learning. He knew there was a better way to signal student success but realized it was both a supply and demand problem--high schools needed to update the transcript and colleges needed to agree to accept the new evidence of learning.

Looney launched the Mastery Transcript Consortium (@MastTranscript) in 2017. The new nonprofit started by defining the problem: current transcripts mark time not learning--they value information regurgitation over making meaning, disciplines over integration, extrinsic over intrinsic rewards, and encourage grade inflation. The whole charade is based on the premise that grades are replicable, validated and meaningful.
Lou Salza's insight:
The traditional high school transcript is both broken and obsolete.  Lawrence School is excited and proud to be a member of the MTC! -Lou
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Diegnan & "Learning Ally" Work together to Provide Audiobooks for Dyslexic Students @Learning_Ally @lawrenceschool 

Diegnan & "Learning Ally" Work together to Provide Audiobooks for Dyslexic Students @Learning_Ally @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Senator Patrick J. Diegnan, Jr.(D-18) today touted a state budget resolution he sponsored that will appropriate $1.5 million dollars for 6,002 New Jersey public school students across the state with disabilities, such as dyslexia, who will have access to a critical accommodation—accessible human-narrated audiobooks.

 

“An unperceived plight of our education system is too many children with reading disabilities like dyslexia go either unidentified or receive ineffective assistance,” said Senator Diegnan (D-Middlesex). “With these additional resources, we can help dyslexics learn to read proficiently and to leverage audiobooks and other aids to enrich and improve their learning while building their self-confidence and self-image.”

 

With the school year commencing, national statistics say that up to 1 in 5 students will have a learning difference. That equates to about 10 million K-12 students nationally who have trouble reading print content, according to Learning Ally, a non-profit organization that helps students with print disabilities such as blindness, visual impairment and dyslexia. The organization offers programs to improve the way students learn at home and in the classroom.
Lou Salza's insight:
Kudos to Sen. Diegan and Learning Ally!--Lou
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Reimagine School: A Lawrence School Blog

Reimagine School: A Lawrence School Blog | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
All my life I‘ve felt denied – by school, teachers, and peers.
But Lawrence has helped me see the world bright and clear.
Here, I feel valued and accepted.
For me and my fellow seniors, our future is near.

Lou Salza's insight:
Student poetry--Powerful and Poignant. Meet Meg '18, heart of a Lion!
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Why the only future worth building includes everyone

Why the only future worth building includes everyone | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
A single individual is enough for hope to exist, and that individual can be you, says His Holiness Pope Francis in this searing TED Talk delivered directly from Vatican City. In a hopeful message to people of all faiths, to those who have power as well as those who don't, the spiritual leader provides illuminating commentary on the world as we currently find it and calls for equality, solidarity and tenderness to prevail. "Let us help each other, all together, to remember that the 'other' is not a statistic, or a number," he says. "We all need each other."
Lou Salza's insight:
Well worth your time---
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