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Rescooped by Michael Harding from Geography Education
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21 charts that explain how the US is changing

21 charts that explain how the US is changing | Student re engagement | Scoop.it
The US is a big, complicated place that has undergone some big changes over its 238 years, and even in the last few decades. Here are 21 charts that explain what life is like today in the US — who we are, where we live, how we work, how we have fun, and how we relate to each other.

 

Tags: USA, map, map archives. 


Via Seth Dixon
Michael Harding's insight:

A really challenging set of charts from the US. 


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Rescooped by Michael Harding from Educational Technology News
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Libraries in the Digital Age? Yes, They're Still Crucial

Libraries in the Digital Age? Yes, They're Still Crucial | Student re engagement | Scoop.it

"Creative workspaces for people to collaborate on computer-based projects. Shared databases among public school, municipal, state and academic libraries. Help for the unemployed in preparing job applications.

 

Those services already are among the many you can find in libraries that are becoming a one-stop shop for people not only in need of information, but also seeking access to modern information technology.

 

And they may represent just the tip of the iceberg in libraries’ continuing journey beyond the stacks."


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, February 16, 2015 6:46 PM

They are and they will change. What I found out over the last few years I taught was that one thing that cannot be taken out is the human touch. Students love having stories read to them so the flesh-and-blood librarian is essential.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Rescooped by Michael Harding from Aprendiendo a Distancia
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Sir Ken Robinson: Do Schools Ignore Talents? - EdTechReview™ (ETR)

Sir Ken Robinson: Do Schools Ignore Talents? - EdTechReview™ (ETR) | Student re engagement | Scoop.it
Sir Ken Robinson on "Do schools ignores talents?". Here is a full transcribe of his interview with Aurora Velez.

Via Alfredo Calderón
Michael Harding's insight:

Perhaps we also need to be concerned about the expectations of those who are successful in the "traditional" modes...

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Mrs. Everett's curator insight, January 14, 2015 10:22 AM

Another excellent analysis of modern education by Sir Ken Robinson

 

Jason Robert LeClair's curator insight, January 15, 2015 8:37 AM

Important insight. I must get his new book.

Rescooped by Michael Harding from Technology in Education
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Education 3.0: Students as Connectors, Creators, & Constructivists - by Dave Guymon

Education 3.0: Students as Connectors, Creators, & Constructivists - by Dave Guymon | Student re engagement | Scoop.it

The way that users have utilized the Internet has changed since its inception. References to Web 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 allude to an evolved relationship with online information and interactivity.


Via Felix Jacomino
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Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, March 4, 2014 10:15 AM

EDUCACIÓN 3.0 --->> NOSOTROS INSISTIMOS EN EL MODELO  - 0.1

Miguel Angel Perez Alvarez's comment, August 13, 2015 12:16 AM
Dead link Why do you rescooped massively?
K_Lynam's comment, August 14, 2015 4:08 PM
Thanks Chris Carter! Miguel Angel Perez Alvarez - if the question was directed to me - I rescoop to share with the teachers & others who follow me, but not the Scoopiteers I follow and to give the Scoopiteers credit - especially for items and sites I do not normally review myself. I don't consider it "massive rescooping", but curating and sharing as ScoopIt was meant to do...
Rescooped by Michael Harding from Things that could be useful in my lessons
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Outcomes Star - Outcomes Star

Outcomes Star - Outcomes Star | Student re engagement | Scoop.it
Official website for the Outcomes Star.Provides information, downloads, guidance and access to the entire suite of Outcomes Star variants including the homelessness Star, sometimes called the St Mungo's Star, the Recovery Star, or mental health Star...

Via Paul Kendrick
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Rescooped by Michael Harding from TECHNOLOGY IN ED
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5 Smart Ways To Use Digital Images In The Classroom

5 Smart Ways To Use Digital Images In The Classroom | Student re engagement | Scoop.it
5 Smart Ways To Use Digital Images In The Classroom

Via Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA
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Scooped by Michael Harding
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Alternative school seeks contract extension with city - Pittsburgh Post Gazette

Alternative school seeks contract extension with city - Pittsburgh Post Gazette | Student re engagement | Scoop.it
Alternative school seeks contract extension with city
Pittsburgh Post Gazette
... the middle school award wall during a tour Tuesday.
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Five stereotypes about poor families and education - Washington Post (blog)

Five stereotypes about poor families and education - Washington Post (blog) | Student re engagement | Scoop.it
Five stereotypes about poor families and education
Washington Post (blog)
...
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Rescooped by Michael Harding from Leadership
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Self Awareness: Key to Sustainable Leadership

Self Awareness: Key to Sustainable Leadership | Student re engagement | Scoop.it
After in-depth interviews with 170 world leaders and classroom discussions with 6,000 executives and MBAs in Authentic Leadership Development (ALD) at Harvard Business School, we've learned three essential steps to building your self-awareness.

Via Anne Leong
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Graeme Reid's curator insight, September 9, 2015 8:17 PM

Self awareness is critical to any changes that you want to make.

Veerle Seymus's curator insight, September 13, 2015 8:45 AM

In my opinion self knowledge is the key skill of successful change managers.

Alonzo Johnson's curator insight, September 15, 2015 7:42 PM

Our effectiveness as leaders rests upon self-awareness.

Rescooped by Michael Harding from 21st Century Teaching and Learning
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Walk the Path of Learning Transformation | School Transformation Thoughts

Walk the Path of Learning Transformation | School Transformation Thoughts | Student re engagement | Scoop.it
I am working with several schools on transforming the school structures, culture and instruction from a traditional model to a more modern version. Each of the schools has their own take on the out...

Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, January 13, 2015 8:27 PM

Insightful reflection on personal/professional  transformation in and out of the teaching and learning environments for the 21st Century learner and teacher.

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, January 13, 2015 10:53 PM

Do we transform things and people? Or, do they transform without us being aware and it is only retrospectively we see the difference?

 

@ivon_ehd1

Rescooped by Michael Harding from Gamification Classroom
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Games, Gamification, and the Quest for Learner Engagement

Games, Gamification, and the Quest for Learner Engagement | Student re engagement | Scoop.it
Game-based learning can turn disconnected, bored learners into engaged participants.

Via Dorian Love
Michael Harding's insight:

I'm dreaming of a game-based curriulum for a Special Assistance School...

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Rescooped by Michael Harding from college and career ready
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Want to Improve Students' Educational Outcomes? Start with Their Parents.

Want to Improve Students' Educational Outcomes? Start with Their Parents. | Student re engagement | Scoop.it
On Tuesday, results of a study called the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies were released by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), bringing to light not altogether surprising information:...

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, October 10, 2013 9:34 AM
By Ilana Garon on October 9, 2013 

 

On Tuesday, results of a study called the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies were released by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), bringing to light not altogether surprising information: American adults--not just kids--lag behind their global peers in math, reading, and problem-skills. The study findings "reinforced just how large the gap is between the nation's high- and low-skilled workers and how hard it is to move ahead when your parents haven't." Adults with college-educated parents were far more likely to have gone to college themselves, and to have higher skills and better wages as a result. Unfortunately, these results belie the prevalence of the iconic first-generation college student, who defeats all odds and lifts him or herself to a better station than that of the previous generation.

The study supports the observations my colleagues and I have routinely made, that parental investment in education--actively, by encouraging their kids to perform well academically, as well as passively, by setting an example of valuation of learning--is the key component to student success. To be clear, this is not me saying that the parents who are insufficiently invested all lack formal education themselves, or that parents must have had the benefit of higher education in order to support their kids' academics; moreover, in the cases of parents who are not college-educated (or in some cases have not finished high school), this has often been due to circumstances outside of their control--needing to work at an early age to support family, health problems, tumultuous immigration experiences, etc.

What I am saying is that the correlation between parents' level of education and their children's shows some important causations: Parents are better able to do everything from assisting with homework, to navigating the bureaucracies of school systems, to helping kids make decisions regarding course-work and long-term goal setting, to promoting an environment of literacy and analytic thinking in the home, the higher their own skill and knowledge levels.

I once had a student who was absent for a few days. He came in with a note, written in a tentative hand by his mom (for whom English was a first language, it bears mentioning for this anecdote). The note read, Please escuse Chris absence, he has algies, followed by her phone number. (I realized after a moment that she meant Chris had allergies.) I appreciated that this parent had taken time to write a note (particularly since, too many times, kids who are absent return to class without any excuse whatsoever, which is a separate issue), all the more so when I saw how she had clearly struggled with the writing. How much more so, then, must she have struggled with the more complex ways (some of which I mentioned above) in which parents support and engage with their kids' education?

The study also underscores what many critics of education reform have been saying all along, that blaming teachers for socio-economic achievement gaps is a wrong-headed approach to the problem. There are teachers of all levels of ability in schools all across America; the strongest correlate to high student achievement is not teacher quality (since that tends to be determined after-the-fact anyway, by looking at students' test scores) but the precursory factors of their parents' income and education levels, which are themselves linked.

Better solutions to address achievement gaps include more affordable post-secondary continuing education opportunities and job-training courses (which nations in Northern Europe already implement consistently, making parents' socio-economic status less difficult obstacle to overcome in these countries), "wraparound" programs through schools wherein parents can learn computer skills and ESL in the evenings, and increased support for first-generation college applicants throughout their entire journey towards post-secondary education, starting as they enter high school. Reform efforts that target root problems of low achievement (rather than addressing ancillary issues, like test scores) will succeed on a much broader level.

Naturally, some government funding at the federal and state levels is needed to operate these types of programs. Now, I can't quite remember, but I think there's some reason those monies aren't available right now... Something about Congress and a government shut-down? Anyone?

Rescooped by Michael Harding from TECHNOLOGY IN ED
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Teaching the Essential Skills of the Mobile Classroom

Teaching the Essential Skills of the Mobile Classroom | Student re engagement | Scoop.it
Think back 20 years. Pay phones still worked, and only doctors carried pagers. Laptops weighed as much as bowling balls, and few of us had Internet access. In fact, much of what we now consider commo

Via Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA
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Low-Income Schools See Big Benefits in Teaching Mindfulness

Low-Income Schools See Big Benefits in Teaching Mindfulness | Student re engagement | Scoop.it
Studies of mindfulness programs in schools have found that regular practice — even just a few minutes per day — improves student self-control and increases their classroom participation, respect for others, happiness, optimism, and self-acceptance...
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My best English lesson: using rugby to engage boys in descriptive writing - The Guardian (blog)

My best English lesson: using rugby to engage boys in descriptive writing - The Guardian (blog) | Student re engagement | Scoop.it
The Guardian (blog) My best English lesson: using rugby to engage boys in descriptive writing The Guardian (blog) Years later I found myself trying to engage a class in descriptive writing with a particular focus on Cwricwlwm Cymreig – the idea of...
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