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New research finds Transcendental Meditation helps ease school stress (Mady)

New research finds Transcendental Meditation helps ease school stress (Mady) | Stress (15) | Scoop.it
Student stress continues to rise in high schools and on college campuses. A recent UCLA survey of entering college freshman reported a decline in good

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Homework, Sleep, and the Student Brain (Mady)

Homework, Sleep, and the Student Brain (Mady) | Stress (15) | Scoop.it
At some point, every parent wishes their high school aged student would go to bed earlier as well as find time to pursue their own passions -- or maybe even choose to relax. This thought reemerged as

 

Homework can be a powerful learning tool -- if designed and assigned correctly. I say "learning," because good homework should be an independent moment for each student or groups of students through virtual collaboration.

 

It should be challenging and engaging enough to allow for deliberate practice of essential content and skills, but not so hard that parents are asked to recall what they learned in high school. All that usually leads to is family stress.

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/10/14/practice-using-blogs-for-home-work-to-get-ict-skills-and-creativity/

 


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Dan Kirsch's comment, May 11, 2014 7:58 PM
You are welcome!
David Mireles's curator insight, May 13, 2014 8:51 AM

I think that this is a very good article when you are not in favor of homework. it staits really cleear some solutionsq that we could use to get rid of homework. Also, it was written by a reliable source. Lastly and most importantly it is in a very easy language to understand.

Alejandro mejia's curator insight, May 13, 2014 1:22 PM

This article focuses on the perspective of a history teacher talking about her opinion on school homework. Her opinion is against homework.  This article includes links to several articles about the topic which help the reader get a good  knowledge About the writing. This article also has good grammar.

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Are Millennials The Anxious Generation? (Bailey)

Are Millennials The Anxious Generation? (Bailey) | Stress (15) | Scoop.it
High school English teacher Julia Arbuckle remembers the anxiety she felt when she was a student at the University of Toronto. “I was stressed because I was doing an arts degree,” she says, “and I thought, ‘How am I going to make it in life?

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Learning by Making is More Humane - MAKE (Mady)

Learning by Making is More Humane - MAKE (Mady) | Stress (15) | Scoop.it

"Human beings learn in lots of different ways. They can learn by reading a book or by sitting in a classroom or by taking an online class. Some ways of learning are more tedious and stressful than others, though. When I was an engineering student in college, I sat in lectures for nine hours straight on Wednesdays, with no lunch break. After those nine hours of lectures, I’d study several hours to prepare for the next day. Is it any wonder I ditched engineering as my college major? There’s got to be a more humane way of learning. Learning by making is that more humane way."


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Homework and Student Stress: "many schools confuse rigor with load” (Casey)

Homework and Student Stress: "many schools confuse rigor with load” (Casey) | Stress (15) | Scoop.it

Is more efficient homework possible? The angst-filled hallways of Washington area high schools could use some relief. If parents and students keep talking about it, that might happen.


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Finn-ished (Bailey)

Finn-ished (Bailey) | Stress (15) | Scoop.it

WHEN the first Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) tests to focus on maths results were published a decade ago, Finland’s blue-cross flag fluttered near the top of the rankings. Its pupils excelled at numeracy, and topped the table in science and reading. Education reformers found the prospect of non-selective, high-achieving and low-stress education bewitching...

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"Down to the wire, as usual" (Bailey)

"Down to the wire, as usual" (Bailey) | Stress (15) | Scoop.it

[via venice_art]

 

As the semester comes down to the wire, things can get stressful. Here's some on-campus outlets for your de-stress needs:

 

Relaxation & Meditation Moments Drop-in Group: http://bit.ly/1hF1lY5

PAWS Stress Less Day: http://bit.ly/1p3Cjpx

Student Success Workshop | Self-care in Stressful Times: http://bit.ly/P0DLZ1

 


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Brain's reaction to virtual reality should prompt further study, suggests new research (Casey)

Brain's reaction to virtual reality should prompt further study, suggests new research (Casey) | Stress (15) | Scoop.it
UCLA neurophysicists have found that space-mapping neurons in the brain react differently to virtual reality than they do to real-world environments. Their findings could be significant for people who use virtual reality for gaming, military, commercial, scientific or other purposes.


"The pattern of activity in a brain region involved in spatial learning in the virtual world is completely different than when it processes activity in the real world," said Mayank Mehta, a UCLA professor of physics, neurology and neurobiology in the UCLA College and the study's senior author. "Since so many people are using virtual reality, it is important to understand why there are such big differences."
The study was published today in the journal Nature Neuroscience.
The scientists were studying the hippocampus, a region of the brain involved in diseases such as Alzheimer's, stroke, depression, schizophrenia, epilepsy and post-traumatic stress disorder. The hippocampus also plays an important role in forming new memories and creating mental maps of space. For example, when a person explores a room, hippocampal neurons become selectively active, providing a "cognitive map" of the environment.
The mechanisms by which the brain makes those cognitive maps remains a mystery, but neuroscientists have surmised that the hippocampus computes distances between the subject and surrounding landmarks, such as buildings and mountains. But in a real maze, other cues, such as smells and sounds, can also help the brain determine spaces and distances.
To test whether the hippocampus could actually form spatial maps using only visual landmarks, Mehta's team devised a noninvasive virtual reality environment and studied how the hippocampal neurons in the brains of rats reacted in the virtual world without the ability to use smells and sounds as cues.
Researchers placed a small harness around rats and put them on a treadmill surrounded by a "virtual world" on large video screens—a virtual environment they describe as even more immersive than IMAX—in an otherwise dark, quiet room. The scientists measured the rats' behavior and the activity of hundreds of neurons in their hippocampi, said UCLA graduate student Lavanya Acharya, a lead author on the research.


The researchers also measured the rats' behavior and neural activity when they walked in a real room designed to look exactly like the virtual reality room.
The scientists were surprised to find that the results from the virtual and real environments were entirely different. In the virtual world, the rats' hippocampal neurons seemed to fire completely randomly, as if the neurons had no idea where the rat was—even though the rats seemed to behave perfectly normally in the real and virtual worlds.
"The 'map' disappeared completely," said Mehta, director of a W.M. Keck Foundation Neurophysics center and a member of UCLA's Brain Research Institute. "Nobody expected this. The neuron activity was a random function of the rat's position in the virtual world."
Explained Zahra Aghajan, a UCLA graduate student and another of the study's lead authors: "In fact, careful mathematical analysis showed that neurons in the virtual world were calculating the amount of distance the rat had walked, regardless of where he was in the virtual space."
They also were shocked to find that although the rats' hippocampal neurons were highly active in the real-world environment, more than half of those neurons shut down in the virtual space.
The virtual world used in the study was very similar to virtual reality environments used by humans, and neurons in a rat's brain would be very hard to distinguish from neurons in the human brain, Mehta said.
His conclusion: "The neural pattern in virtual reality is substantially different from the activity pattern in the real world. We need to fully understand how virtual reality affects the brain."
Neurons Bach would appreciate
In addition to analyzing the activity of individual neurons, Mehta's team studied larger groups of the brain cells. Previous research, including studies by his group, have revealed that groups of neurons create a complex pattern using brain rhythms.
"These complex rhythms are crucial for learning and memory, but we can't hear or feel these rhythms in our brain. They are hidden under the hood from us," Mehta said. "The complex pattern they make defies human imagination. The neurons in this memory-making region talk to each other using two entirely different languages at the same time. One of those languages is based on rhythm; the other is based on intensity."
Every neuron in the hippocampus speaks the two languages simultaneously, Mehta said, comparing the phenomenon to the multiple concurrent melodies of a Bach fugue.
Mehta's group reports that in the virtual world, the language based on rhythm has a similar structure to that in the real world, even though it says something entirely different in the two worlds. The language based on intensity, however, is entirely disrupted.
When people walk or try to remember something, the activity in the hippocampus becomes very rhythmic and these complex, rhythmic patterns appear, Mehta said. Those rhythms facilitate the formation of memories and our ability to recall them. Mehta hypothesizes that in some people with learning and memory disorders, these rhythms are impaired.
"Neurons involved in memory interact with other parts of the hippocampus like an orchestra," Mehta said. "It's not enough for every violinist and every trumpet player to play their music flawlessly. They also have to be perfectly synchronized."
Mehta believes that by retuning and synchronizing these rhythms, doctors will be able to repair damaged memory, but said doing so remains a huge challenge.
"The need to repair memories is enormous," noted Mehta, who said neurons and synapses—the connections between neurons—are amazingly complex machines.
Previous research by Mehta showed that the hippocampal circuit rapidly evolves with learning and that brain rhythms are crucial for this process. Mehta conducts his research with rats because analyzing complex brain circuits and neural activity with high precision currently is not possible in humans.
Explore further: Activity in dendrites is critical in memory formation

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Quincy Helm's curator insight, October 11, 2017 11:30 PM

This article is different from the others. This actually doesn't mention music at all. Rather how virtual reality affects the neurons in the brain. I chose this article because not only did I find it compelling, but understanding how this technology affects the human brain could certainly affect how it will be used in the future. 

 

Medical Xpress is known for having articles about the medical industry. It is a trusted source but not needed for music industry professionals.

CAFEL 32 RA's curator insight, October 25, 2017 5:10 AM

Etude scientifique sur les recations du cerveaux aux realites virtuelles

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Mind, Brain, and Education | Students at the Center (Bailey)

Mind, Brain, and Education | Students at the Center (Bailey) | Stress (15) | Scoop.it

"Mind, Brain and Education" publication from "Students at the Center" has been released. 

 

"What does brain research tell us about how we learn and how learning, in turn, shapes the architecture of the brain? What is the connection between the stress of poverty and the impact of emotions on learning? To answer such questions, this paper draws on recent brain research and research in cognitive science, highlighting the positive impact of student-centered learning approaches."


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How To Combat Student Plagiarism - Edudemic (Mady)

How To Combat Student Plagiarism - Edudemic (Mady) | Stress (15) | Scoop.it
It's exam time and students are stressing about turning in papers on time. What's a teacher to do in terms of noticing student plagiarism? (Extremely useful in #pbl project based learning.
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Student, 20, dies hours after doctors sent him home for FIFTH time claiming he was 'stressed' (Mady)

Student, 20, dies hours after doctors sent him home for FIFTH time claiming he was 'stressed' (Mady) | Stress (15) | Scoop.it

A student died hours after being sent home from hospital for the fifth time by doctors who said he was 'stressed'.
Talented IT student Andrew Moore, 20, was admitted to three different hospitals on five separate occasions in the weeks before his death after collapsing and feeling unwell.
His father Peter, from Stockport, said his son was sent home with anti-anxiety drugs and referred to mental health specialists.

Less than 24 hours after his final hospital visit, to Stepping Hill in Stockport, Andrew collapsed at his family home in Cheadle and never regained consciousness.

He was taken back to Stepping Hill and pronounced dead two hours later.
A post-mortem examination was inconclusive and further tests are under way to establish the cause of his death.

His family said Andrew had undergone an operation last year to repair an abnormal connection in a vein between his lungs and heart.
There is no suggestion there were any drugs or medication in his system other than a mild asthma medicine.
Two hospitals where Andrew was treated - Stepping Hill and Wythenshawe - have now launched investigations into the care he received -- WHAT THE FCK HAPPENED - 5 times sent home .. by 5 different doctors .. someone's head needs to roll!! - Fx

Read more at : 

http://focusglobalnews.lefora.com/2012/11/27/student-20-dies-hours-after-doctors-sent-him-home-/

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5 Easy Ways To Reduce Student Stress In The Classroom (Bailey)

5 Easy Ways To Reduce Student Stress In The Classroom (Bailey) | Stress (15) | Scoop.it
5 Easy Ways To Reduce Student Stress In The Classroom

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Napier offers ‘pet therapy’ to ease exam stress (Casey)

Napier offers ‘pet therapy’ to ease exam stress (Casey) | Stress (15) | Scoop.it
ONCE upon a time the answer to student stress was a trip to the pub. Now, in a bid to tackle the pressure of looming exams, chiefs at a top city university have called in the dogs.

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Marketing Edinburgh's curator insight, April 11, 2014 4:51 AM

Edinburgh Napier University is offering “pet therapy” sessions to its students, allowing them to meet and play with specially trained pooches in a bid to take their minds off this year’s exam season.

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The Mainstream : New Success Center: Listening to students’ needs (Casey)

The Mainstream : New Success Center: Listening to students’ needs (Casey) | Stress (15) | Scoop.it

Finding help with the stresses and problems of student life just got a little easier because of changes recently made to UCC’s former tutoring lab. The name change reflects the center’s new, broader scope.

The Director of Learning Skills, Terrance Bradford, said the changes came as a direct result of “simply listening to students.” The Success Center now offers help with everything from time management skills to academic success plan development and help with online classes. It still offers individual tutoring. In addition, financial aid and baby sitting issues are addressed.

Bradford actually listened to what students were saying to one another in conversation at the tutoring tables to come up with his plan for making the Center more student-success oriented. His plan worked. “We have been able to more than double our tutoring hours compared to years past, despite declining enrollment through repeat visits.”

DENNIS WAHLMAN / MAINSTREAMThe Success Center provides study group spaces, tutors and other free opportunities such as the Course Skills Mastery online instruction which helps students prepare for courses like math. 
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, October 30, 2013 2:26 AM

Finding help with the stresses and problems of student life just got a little easier because of changes recently made to UCC’s former tutoring lab. The name change reflects the center’s new, broader scope.

The Director of Learning Skills, Terrance Bradford, said the changes came as a direct result of “simply listening to students.” The Success Center now offers help with everything from time management skills to academic success plan development and help with online classes. It still offers individual tutoring. In addition, financial aid and baby sitting issues are addressed.

Bradford actually listened to what students were saying to one another in conversation at the tutoring tables to come up with his plan for making the Center more student-success oriented. His plan worked. “We have been able to more than double our tutoring hours compared to years past, despite declining enrollment through repeat visits.”

DENNIS WAHLMAN / MAINSTREAMThe Success Center provides study group spaces, tutors and other free opportunities such as the Course Skills Mastery online instruction which helps students prepare for courses like math. 
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Students stressed by new emphasis on self-reliance (Casey)

Students stressed by new emphasis on self-reliance (Casey) | Stress (15) | Scoop.it

The new state standards, implemented this year, demand more student self-reliance. Teachers say they are encountering more surly or sullen behavior from students who feel stressed without the supplementary information they were accustomed to getting from teachers. The challenge, Muro said, is that students have become accustomed to "front-loading," meaning teachers tell them what they will be reading before they read.

 

"If we were reading about Betsy Ross, we would talk about her contribution first. Now they have to find the information on their own."

That can lead to shouts of "I don't get it," as students read material at the edge of their "frustration level." "They're not used to independence," Shannon Vicchiariello said.

 

My two cents: Not only will CCSS challenge teachers in their curriculum planning, instructional strategies and assessments, the CCSS pose challenges for teachers with regard to classroom management and building student investment.  In the end, it will be worth it! 


Via Deb Gardner
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