Strategy & Management
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How to Consult Like Peter Drucker - Forbes

How to Consult Like Peter Drucker - Forbes | Strategy & Management | Scoop.it
In a few weeks, the Association of Management Consulting Firms is set to hold a free webinar for university students, with the aim of showing them how they “can find exciting career paths within the consulting industry.” So I thought I’d take it upon...
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Delivering large-scale IT projects on time - McKinsey Quarterly - OCTOBER 2012 • Michael Bloch, Sven Blumberg, and Jürgen Laartz

Delivering large-scale IT projects on time - McKinsey Quarterly - OCTOBER 2012 • Michael Bloch, Sven Blumberg, and Jürgen Laartz | Strategy & Management | Scoop.it

Large IT efforts often cost much more than planned; some can put the whole organization in jeopardy. The companies that defy these odds are the ones that master key dimensions that align IT and business value.

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3 adages out of the 2012 PMI project of the year award finalist. What’s yours ?

3 adages out of the 2012 PMI project of the year award finalist. What’s yours ? | Strategy & Management | Scoop.it
Mathieu A.'s insight:

I feel now more confident than ever in my favorite “adages” in project management, since I figured them out in the P&G Project, elected PMP project of the year, lead by Bruno Pont and Francisco Frada. (Read full article on the P&G project on PM Network - January 2013 issue - http://bit.ly/VKVvIS)

I’m happy to share it with you hoping that it will be a modest contribution to your 2013 project’s success.

1- An IT project is not an IT project: It’s a business opportunity for innovation and change.
P&G was primarily going for a system update and realised that there was an opportunity to innovate and change:
- Work processes
- Organization structure
- Operating strategy
- Go to market strategy
- and ultimately : Information systems
Did your current “IT project” encompass these subjects ?

2- A well prepared project is a half completed project.
As Patrick Arlequeeuw, P&G, reports: “The interesting part is that the preparation time was almost half the project”.
My own experience made me notice that under the pressure to do  “agile project methodology”, in order to accelerate execution, it also tends to be inappropriately used in project preparation phases, rushing project managers to jump into execution. As a result, how many projects may have unclear objectives, unknown impacts on daily operations, and miss the window for innovation and change ?

3- Better to walk in the good direction, than to run in the wrong one.
In the continuity of the previous adage, this P&G project definitely seems to leverage all possible opportunities leading to cost savings or sales increase. Instead of running into the “technical” upgrade, they are definitely walking in the good direction.
For sceptics, walking doesn’t mean arriving later, or losing time and money, because we know that running in the wrong direction will burn more money and time, while not taking the journey of innovation.

What’s your own adage in project management ?

Best regards and happy new year!

 

Mathieu Alia.

Preparing PMP Certification for 2013.

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Simple Rules for a Complex World - by Donald Sull and Kathleen M. Eisenhardt

Simple Rules for a Complex World - by Donald Sull and Kathleen M. Eisenhardt | Strategy & Management | Scoop.it

How do successful companies shape their high-level strategies? A decade ago, London Business School’s Sull and Stanford’s Eisenhardt looked for the answer by studying the era’s leading high-tech firms. They discovered that such firms relied not on complicated frameworks but on simple rules of thumb. Managers translated corporate objectives into a few straightforward guidelines that helped employees make on-the-spot decisions and adapt to constantly shifting environments, while keeping the big picture in mind.

This article describes the authors’ subsequent research into why simple rules work and how firms develop them. Typically, after setting its priorities, a company will identify a bottleneck preventing it from making progress toward them and then create rules for managing that bottleneck. At América Latina LogÍstica, for instance, the problem was capital spending: The railway had only a tenth of the funds it needed to invest in growth and infrastructure. So a cross-functional team came up with rules to guide spending: Any proposal had to remove obstacles to growth, minimize up-front costs, provide immediate benefits, and reuse existing resources. The rules allowed employees across departments to make difficult trade-offs and quickly innovate solutions that put the firm on the fast track.

Effective rules, the authors say, are specific, not broad; draw from historical experience; and are made by their users, not the CEO. Moreover, as a company evolves, they evolve with it.

 

http://hbr.org/2012/09/simple-rules-for-a-complex-world/ar/1

 

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