Strategy & Governance
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Strategy & Governance
Take a seat in the marvellous world of Strategy and understand the complex Governance around it !
Curated by Fouad Bendris
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Why APIs Should Be Regulated

Why APIs Should Be Regulated | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it

Data audits may be helpful in maintaining balance between data-rich and data-poor companies.

The need for regulation is clear: among Western companies, at least 79% of the American public uses Facebook. Similarly, Google accounts for 90% of search traffic. With access to large volumes of user data, these companies are able to create fine-grained, multidimensional views — what we call digital replicas — of consumers that pose several challenges to society’s stakeholders: 


- For consumers, use of these digital replicas by the digital titans and third parties compromises individual privacy. 

- For regulators, these digital replicas are impossible to monitor and track. 

- For service providers, titans control access to consumers and act as a “competitive bottleneck” to their ability to reach millions of customers. 

- For competitors, digital replicas create unfair hurdles that tilt the playing field toward companies with the most data and limit competitors’ access to data.

Fouad Bendris's insight:
Alphabet, Apple, Facebook, Amazon, Alibaba, Tencent, and Baidu are today’s digital titans: Their services accelerate innovation and enable new business models, but also create expansive data empires that allow them to control and shape the digital world. Given their rapid growth and dominance, concerned citizens and regulators in Western markets are asking: How should these digital titans be regulated ? To address these issues, regulators need to focus not only on market dominance, but also on data dominance — specifically, how these companies integrate the vast quantities of data to which they have access and how they share their data or insights with third parties. Given the broad consequences of digital titans’ unbridled behavior, we need sweeping regulatory reforms ... 
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Decades Ago, Pilots Learned to “Fly by Instruments.” Doctors Need to Do the Same !

Decades Ago, Pilots Learned to “Fly by Instruments.” Doctors Need to Do the Same ! | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it

Diagnosis should depend on machines, not just memorization.

By better teaching students and practitioners how to fly by instruments and to trust those instruments, we could both improve training and solve many of the problems that lead to those medical errors: In medical education and professional development, cognitive computing and robust simulation platforms can shorten training times and provide safer environments for learners to make mistakes. Simulation platforms allow better training to standards and can be adjusted to the learner’s pace of learning. They also allow in-depth training in tasks, demonstration of cognitive knowledge, exercise of judgment, and improvement in team dynamics. Digital health assistants (also known as digital coaches and virtual assistants) can help doctors take a more complete patient history and augment patient education. AI-enabled technologies can help provide more accurate diagnoses earlier (studies have shown 20% to 30% of initial diagnoses are wrong) and provide more accurate treatment plans.

Fouad Bendris's insight:
Though health care is still in the early stages of adopting AI and digital technologies, it is already making great strides. In radiology such technology will augment human competence in image recognition. Digital technology now assists with detection of diabetic retinopathy, heart arrhythmias, and dermatologic diseases. Diabetes care will be enhanced through wearable sensors and AI to detect or prevent harmful hypoglycemic episodes. Remote monitoring will prevent or detect deterioration in chronic conditions such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and congestive heart failure, reducing costly hospital re-admissions. And technology has the potential to connect medical professionals across the continuum of care, reducing the potential for patients to fall through the cracks. But to realize the full potential of AI and other digital technologies we will need to overhaul medical education for future physicians and nurses and rethink professional development for current caregivers.
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How to Think for Yourself When Algorithms Control What You Read ?

How to Think for Yourself When Algorithms Control What You Read ? | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it

Become a smarter consumer.

What can be done? While data scientists, policymakers, and ethics boards work on large-scale, long-term fixes, it’s incumbent on us, as individual agents, to ensure that we find out and learn what we really need. Against the technological backdrop described above, it’s more important than ever that the modern knowledge worker makes good business decisions based on good information: factual, unbiased, broad-based. Of course, resistance to algorithms is difficult because we’re up against a sophisticated, secret system. But it’s not futile, yet. Here are five practical steps you can take right now.

- First, just be aware of what’s going on (a lot of decisions are being made for you by invisible code) and what’s at stake (the consequences of having a very specific, narrow world view).

- Second, help the algorithm. Or game it. Change your settings to allow some randomized recommendations (if the system has this feature).

- Third, get off the radar. From browsing privately in incognito mode to searching anonymously with a search engine that doesn’t track you like duckduckgo, there are a host of methods at your disposal.

- Fourth, consciously decide how much human influence you want. Personalized email digests and social media feeds are algorithmically determined. Traditional editorial is still picked by the human hand.

- Fifth, step out of the digital echo chamber by stepping out of digital altogether. The physical world is consistently chaotic. Pay greater attention to the feelings, observations, musings, and conversations you have in real life.

Fouad Bendris's insight:
With the flick of a switch, a handful of tech giants can change the nature and extent of mankind’s ingestion of information. In 2013, Google took a step towards understanding the intent of their users with the Hummingbird algorithm. Twitter replaced most-recent with most-important tweets when they introduced their algorithmic timeline in 2016. Facebook claimed they’ll be replacing clickbait with more meaningful interactions on their feeds earlier this year. These changes are almost always met with public uproar for a few weeks, soon after which humanity acquiesces. The ability for an elite to instantly alter the thoughts and behavior of billions of people is unprecedented.
The influence of algorithms is immense and double-edged. Some of the toxic effects have been alluded to here. The benefits are also substantial: from thousands, millions, even billions of pieces of mostly irrelevant content, algorithms serves up a feed of compulsive, inspiring nuggets. Fix your feed to optimize your perspective on the world wide web as well as the big wide world.
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The prerequisites for trust in teamwork and creativity ! 

The prerequisites for trust in teamwork and creativity !  | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it
So trust is important. It takes time to develop, and there is a formula to understand it and accelerate it through turning and pulling the appropriate knobs and levers. But it will never, ever develop without the following three prerequisites. 
 1. Perceived Competence You could never trust someone on the team who you don’t believe is competent in what he or she does. Collaborative, high performance teamwork depends on every member doing their job, and doing it well.
2. Shared Values Every person is driven by a set of core values. Some values could be objectively and universally bad, while others could be objectively and universally good. However, most values could simple be different among different members of the team, and so could the prioritization of those values.
3. Fairness and Equality We are driven and affected, to a large extent, by fairness and equality. If one member of the team is higher ranking than the others, the team could still be productive, but if that higher-ranking member is exercising their rank to overrule or veto decisions made by others, trust will not develop in that team.
Fouad Bendris's insight:
Creative and collaborative teamwork will only take place if there is a high level of trust among team members. Trust allows members of the team to do three things that produce true collaboration. The first is to be vulnerable with each other, ask stupid questions, and propose stupid ideas. The second is to feel comfortable enough to provide constructive feedback to others on the team. Without such feedback, bad ideas may go through. Finally, the third is to feel confident enough to accept such constructive feedback. It is very easy and natural to become defensive when criticism is offered to you. But keep in mind that while maybe 10% of the feedback you are getting it true, 100% of it is true in perception ... 
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Should You Cover for a Friend’s Mistakes at Work?

Should You Cover for a Friend’s Mistakes at Work? | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it

Advice for when — or whether — to intervene.

At this point, if this person is really a friend, you’ll want to get a little more serious about understanding what’s going on. Is it a particularly busy time at home? If so, you can suggest the person ask for help from other members of the team, rather than leaving everyone in the lurch. If it’s something more worrisome, like a physical or mental health issue, your friend might be relieved to have someone to confide in. Don’t push if your friend isn’t comfortable discussing the problem. In that case, you can encourage them to seek support outside the office.If you have a friend who’s not pulling their weight, make it clear when you cover for them, share the impact their behavior is having on both of you, let the natural consequences of their inaction happen, and, if necessary, alert their manager if the repercussions of their behavior could have negative impacts on the team, the organization, or the customer. That’s what a real friend would do ... 



Fouad Bendris's insight:
It’s nice to have a friend at work who cares about you and looks out for your best interests. Research has even shown that it contributes to your engagement. The benefits of having a friend at work are clear, but what about the downsides? What happens when your friend starts to let things slip? How do you handle it when you notice they aren’t keeping up? Should you cover for them?As with most difficult situations at work, there isn’t one right answer. The approach you take depends on a variety of factors. First, how worrisome are the slips? Will they create significant problems for your team, or even your customer? Next, how self-aware is your friend about their harmful behavior and the impact it’s having? Finally, how is your friend’s manager handling the situation? Is anyone other than you noticing the problem? The answers to these questions will help you decide when to intervene and how quickly to escalate from one of the following steps to the next !
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Much Ado about Nothing ! 

Much Ado about Nothing !  | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it
Remember - Sometimes only time is the best cure for stupidity !
Fouad Bendris's insight:
Probable impossibilities are to be preferred to improbable possibilities - Aristotle 

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6 Ways to Take Control of Your Career Development If Your Company Doesn’t Care About It ! 

6 Ways to Take Control of Your Career Development If Your Company Doesn’t Care About It !  | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it
Here are six things you can do to take control of your career development ... 
- Understand what you’re evaluated on. What does success look like in your position? What are your job goals and success metrics?
- Solve for your own blind spots. Top performers are always learning and adjusting, and routinely seek feedback from their boss, peers, and subordinates. If your boss doesn’t proactively give you feedback, start the conversation yourself
- Codify your learnings. You can capture feedback and learning by keeping a journal. List the five to 10 skills or competencies you need to develop in your position, and rate yourself (either on your own or with the help of a trusted adviser) on each.
- Increase your visibility with the C-suite. It’s not always possible to get noticed by senior leaders through your direct work, so you might try volunteering for initiatives, such as charity work, company events, or on-campus recruiting
- Become an expert in an area of increasing importance to your company. Your company may be grappling with a disruption from a new technology such as the internet of things, artificial intelligence, or cloud-based computing
- Seek good counsel and mentoring. The perspective of a senior person is invaluable, but pouncing on someone — “Will you be my mentor?” — is likely to scare them off 
Fouad Bendris's insight:
It’s the DIY era of learning ! 
We are now in the era of do-it-yourself career development. Companies less frequently offer formal training — a trend that has been around for years. This may be because employees change jobs so frequently (job tenure now averages about four years) that firms don’t see the value in investing in people who are likely to leave. This is a sharp contrast with the investment that senior leaders used to make in employees. During my 11 years at PepsiCo, mostly during the 1990s, “personal development” was treated as a major company initiative. Unfortunately, organizations today are unknowingly leaving employees with skill gaps and blind spots that can derail careers and organizational effectiveness. And managers aren’t helping
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Barbara Lond's curator insight, January 28, 10:38 AM
It’s the DIY era of learning ! 
We are now in the era of do-it-yourself career development. Companies less frequently offer formal training — a trend that has been around for years. This may be because employees change jobs so frequently (job tenure now averages about four years) that firms don’t see the value in investing in people who are likely to leave. This is a sharp contrast with the investment that senior leaders used to make in employees. During my 11 years at PepsiCo, mostly during the 1990s, “personal development” was treated as a major company initiative. Unfortunately, organizations today are unknowingly leaving employees with skill gaps and blind spots that can derail careers and organizational effectiveness. And managers aren’t helping
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In a Distracted World, Solitude Is a Competitive Advantage

In a Distracted World, Solitude Is a Competitive Advantage | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it

Shut off the relentless stream of time-wasters.

The ability to focus is a competitive advantage in the world today. Here are some thoughts on how to stay focused at work: 

-  Build periods of solitude into your schedule. Treat it as you would any meeting or an appointment. If you don’t schedule and commit to solitude, something else will fill the space.

- Analyze where your time is best spent. Most of us have meetings that we can afford to miss, and most of us underutilize our energy because we have not allocated time to reflect and be rigorous about our priorities.

- Starve your distractions. Social media, YouTube, and the limitless possibilities of the internet hang over our heads.

- Don’t be too busy to learn how to be less busy. One of the biggest reasons we struggle to focus is because we fill our schedules with too many commitments and we consistently prioritize urgent tasks over important ones.

- Create a “stop doing” list. There are only so many hours in a day. As your to-do list grows, you cannot keep accumulating more tasks.


Fouad Bendris's insight:
“Always remember: Your focus determines your reality.”
Technology has undoubtedly ushered in progress in a myriad of ways. But this same force has also led to work environments that inundate people with a relentless stream of emails, meetings, and distractions. In 2010, Eric Schmidt, then the CEO of Google, shared a concern with the world: “Every two days, we create as much information as we did from the dawn of civilization until 2003. I spend most of my time assuming the world is not ready for the technology revolution that will be happening soon.” Are we able to process the volume of information, stimuli, and various distractions coming at us each and every day?

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Barbara Lond's curator insight, January 28, 10:38 AM
“Always remember: Your focus determines your reality.”
Technology has undoubtedly ushered in progress in a myriad of ways. But this same force has also led to work environments that inundate people with a relentless stream of emails, meetings, and distractions. In 2010, Eric Schmidt, then the CEO of Google, shared a concern with the world: “Every two days, we create as much information as we did from the dawn of civilization until 2003. I spend most of my time assuming the world is not ready for the technology revolution that will be happening soon.” Are we able to process the volume of information, stimuli, and various distractions coming at us each and every day?

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The Legal Risks of Monitoring Employees Online ... 

The Legal Risks of Monitoring Employees Online ...  | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it
Enter data loss prevention, or “DLP” solutions, that help companies detect anomalous patterns or behavior through keystroke logging, network traffic monitoring, natural language processing, and other methods, all while enforcing relevant workplace policies. And while there is a legitimate business case for deploying this technology, DLP tools may implicate a panoply of federal and state privacy laws, ranging from laws around employee monitoring, computer crime, wiretapping, and potentially data breach statutes. Given all of this, companies must consider the legal risks associated with DLP tools before they are implemented and plan accordingly. There are several key questions companies should consider before deploying DLP software. First, whom are you monitoring? Second, what are you monitoring? Third, where are you monitoring?
Fouad Bendris's insight:
If you have a global workforce, you must have a global policy ! 
Perhaps the most well-known data heist perpetrated by an “insider” was Edward Snowden’s appropriation and disclosure of data from the National Security Agency. The Snowden case demonstrated the cost of focusing on external threats to the exclusion of internal bad actors. In the aftermath, companies are increasingly adopting sophisticated technologies that can help prevent the intentional or inadvertent export of corporate IP and other sensitive and proprietary data.
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Barbara Lond's curator insight, December 22, 2017 3:37 PM
If you have a global workforce, you must have a global policy ! 
Perhaps the most well-known data heist perpetrated by an “insider” was Edward Snowden’s appropriation and disclosure of data from the National Security Agency. The Snowden case demonstrated the cost of focusing on external threats to the exclusion of internal bad actors. In the aftermath, companies are increasingly adopting sophisticated technologies that can help prevent the intentional or inadvertent export of corporate IP and other sensitive and proprietary data.
Barbara Lond's curator insight, January 28, 10:39 AM
If you have a global workforce, you must have a global policy ! 
Perhaps the most well-known data heist perpetrated by an “insider” was Edward Snowden’s appropriation and disclosure of data from the National Security Agency. The Snowden case demonstrated the cost of focusing on external threats to the exclusion of internal bad actors. In the aftermath, companies are increasingly adopting sophisticated technologies that can help prevent the intentional or inadvertent export of corporate IP and other sensitive and proprietary data.
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Driverless Cars Will Change Auto Insurance. Here’s How Insurers Can Adapt

Driverless Cars Will Change Auto Insurance. Here’s How Insurers Can Adapt | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it

Fewer drivers could mean less revenue.

There is little doubt that the widespread adoption of autonomous vehicles will have a huge impact on the automobile insurance industry. Research and computer modeling conducted by Accenture in collaboration with the Stevens Institute of Technology indicates that as many as 23 million fully autonomous vehicles will be traveling U.S. highways by 2035 (out of about 250 million total cars and trucks registered in the U.S.)

Fouad Bendris's insight:
This rapid growth of autonomous vehicles will involve a major shift, not only in our driving habits and patterns, but in the ownership of vehicles. We believe that most fully autonomous vehicles will not be owned by individuals, but by auto manufacturers such as General Motors, by technology companies such as Google and Apple, and by other service providers such as ride-sharing services. Unlike individual car owners – whose vehicles typically sit idle most of the time — fleet owners can send autonomous vehicles out on multiple trips on a 24-hour basis, amortizing the cost of ownership.
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Barbara Lond's curator insight, January 28, 10:39 AM
This rapid growth of autonomous vehicles will involve a major shift, not only in our driving habits and patterns, but in the ownership of vehicles. We believe that most fully autonomous vehicles will not be owned by individuals, but by auto manufacturers such as General Motors, by technology companies such as Google and Apple, and by other service providers such as ride-sharing services. Unlike individual car owners – whose vehicles typically sit idle most of the time — fleet owners can send autonomous vehicles out on multiple trips on a 24-hour basis, amortizing the cost of ownership.
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Managers Aren’t Doing Enough to Train Employees for the Future

Managers Aren’t Doing Enough to Train Employees for the Future | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it

As we began analyzing the results of our recent survey, we fully expected to see supervisor support emerge as important to training and development. What we didn’t anticipate, however, was how powerful that link would be. We also identified several other areas where workers reported discrepancies in the opportunities available to them.While there are many uncertainties about the future of work, one thing is sure: Adapting to a rapidly changing environment requires a strategic approach to training and development. It’s the best way to ensure that employees can see what is possible, solve previously intractable problems, and do the work that will lead to a prosperous future.

Fouad Bendris's insight:
As topics like automation, artificial intelligence, and skills retraining dominate conversations about the future of work, some predict catastrophic job loss and a dystopian future where legions of unskilled workers languish unemployable in the margins. Others, like O’Reilly Media’s Tim O’Reilly, aren’t so pessimistic. They remind us that we’ve been here before and that, rather than simply increasing efficiency and cutting costs, emerging technologies can be used to augment our work and raise the quality of life for the population as a whole.
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Barbara Lond's curator insight, December 22, 2017 3:37 PM
As topics like automation, artificial intelligence, and skills retraining dominate conversations about the future of work, some predict catastrophic job loss and a dystopian future where legions of unskilled workers languish unemployable in the margins. Others, like O’Reilly Media’s Tim O’Reilly, aren’t so pessimistic. They remind us that we’ve been here before and that, rather than simply increasing efficiency and cutting costs, emerging technologies can be used to augment our work and raise the quality of life for the population as a whole.
Barbara Lond's curator insight, January 28, 10:40 AM
As topics like automation, artificial intelligence, and skills retraining dominate conversations about the future of work, some predict catastrophic job loss and a dystopian future where legions of unskilled workers languish unemployable in the margins. Others, like O’Reilly Media’s Tim O’Reilly, aren’t so pessimistic. They remind us that we’ve been here before and that, rather than simply increasing efficiency and cutting costs, emerging technologies can be used to augment our work and raise the quality of life for the population as a whole.
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Can You Be a Great Leader Without Technical Expertise?

Can You Be a Great Leader Without Technical Expertise? | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it
There is broad consensus across many schools that teach leadership education about the core elements of what leaders need to know. These factors include: The ability to motivate self and others, effective oral and written communication, critical thinking skills, problem solving ability, and skills at working with teams and delegating tasks. On the surface, this seems like a nice list. Good leaders do have these abilities and if you wanted to create future leaders, making sure they have these skills is a good bet. They need to take in a large volume of information and distill it into the essential elements that define the core problems to be solved. They need to organize teams to solve these problems and to communicate to a group why they should share a common vision. They need to establish trust with a group and then use that trust to allow the team to accomplish more than it could alone.
Fouad Bendris's insight:
Leadership is not a transferable skill ! 
There is a broad assumption in society and in education that the skills you need to be a leader are more or less transferable. If you can inspire and motivate people in one arena, you should be able to apply those skills to do the same in another venue. But recent research is rightly challenging this notion. Studies suggest that the best leaders know a lot about the domain in which they are leading, and part of what makes them successful in a management role is technical competence. For example, hospitals managed by doctors perform better than those managed by people with other backgrounds. And there are many examples of people who ran one company effectively and had trouble transferring their skills to the new organization.
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How Coca-Cola, Netflix, and Amazon Learn from Failure ?

How Coca-Cola, Netflix, and Amazon Learn from Failure ? | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it

Encourage your team to embrace mistakes.

Even Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, arguably the most successful entrepreneur in the world, makes the case as directly as he can that his company’s growth and innovation is built on its failures. “If you’re going to take bold bets, they’re going to be experiments,” he explained shortly after Amazon bought Whole Foods. “And if they’re experiments, you don’t know ahead of time if they’re going to work. Experiments are by their very nature prone to failure. But a few big successes compensate for dozens and dozens of things that didn’t work.” The message from these CEOs is as easy to understand as it is hard for most of us to put into practice. I can’t tell you how many business leaders I meet, how many organizations I visit, that espouse the virtues of innovation and creativity. Yet so many of these same leaders and organizations live in fear of mistakes, missteps, and disappointments — which is why they have so little innovation and creativity. If you’re not prepared to fail, you’re not prepared to learn. And unless people and organizations manage to keep learning as fast as the world is changing, they’ll never keep growing and evolving ... 

Fouad Bendris's insight:
Why, all of a sudden, are so many successful business leaders urging their companies and colleagues to make more mistakes and embrace more failures? In May, right after he became CEO of Coca-Cola Co., James Quincey called upon rank-and-file managers to get beyond the fear of failure that had dogged the company since the “New Coke” fiasco of so many years ago. “If we’re not making mistakes,” he insisted, “we’re not trying hard enough.” In June, even as his company was enjoying unparalleled success with its subscribers, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings worried that his fabulously valuable streaming service had too many hit shows and was canceling too few new shows. “Our hit ratio is too high right now,” he told a technology conference. “We have to take more risk…to try more crazy things…we should have a higher cancel rate overall.”
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Barbara Lond's curator insight, December 22, 2017 3:38 PM
Why, all of a sudden, are so many successful business leaders urging their companies and colleagues to make more mistakes and embrace more failures? In May, right after he became CEO of Coca-Cola Co., James Quincey called upon rank-and-file managers to get beyond the fear of failure that had dogged the company since the “New Coke” fiasco of so many years ago. “If we’re not making mistakes,” he insisted, “we’re not trying hard enough.” In June, even as his company was enjoying unparalleled success with its subscribers, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings worried that his fabulously valuable streaming service had too many hit shows and was canceling too few new shows. “Our hit ratio is too high right now,” he told a technology conference. “We have to take more risk…to try more crazy things…we should have a higher cancel rate overall.”
Barbara Lond's curator insight, January 28, 10:43 AM
Why, all of a sudden, are so many successful business leaders urging their companies and colleagues to make more mistakes and embrace more failures? In May, right after he became CEO of Coca-Cola Co., James Quincey called upon rank-and-file managers to get beyond the fear of failure that had dogged the company since the “New Coke” fiasco of so many years ago. “If we’re not making mistakes,” he insisted, “we’re not trying hard enough.” In June, even as his company was enjoying unparalleled success with its subscribers, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings worried that his fabulously valuable streaming service had too many hit shows and was canceling too few new shows. “Our hit ratio is too high right now,” he told a technology conference. “We have to take more risk…to try more crazy things…we should have a higher cancel rate overall.”
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Can America Win The New Century? 

Can America Win The New Century?  | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it
- Have You Ever Dreamed A Dream? In August 1929, just before the stock market crash, Louis Bamberger and his sister, Caroline Bamberger Fuld, sold their department store in Newark to R.H. Macy & Company for $25 million ($343 million in 2015 dollars). Grateful to the people of Newark for their support, they planned to endow a medical college in that city.
- Science, The Endless Frontier As the political situation in Europe continued to become more precarious during the 1930s, its greatest minds flooded America’s shores. From Niels Bohr to Wolfgang Pauli it quickly became the greatest migration of intellectual talent the world had ever seen. No longer a backwater, America had, in the space of a decade, become home to the planet’s finest scientific minds.
- A Technological Superpower Bush’s report did far more than document the success of a government program. It set forth a new vision in which scientific advancement would be publicly funded, but made available for private purposes in order to create newfound prosperity.
- Regaining The Spirit Of Exploration What made Bush’s vision so unique — and so powerful — is that it recognized new discoveries, as an end in themselves, advance society as a whole. By expanding knowledge we create new possibilities that are impossible to see beforehand. Einstein, for example, never thought he would see practical applications arise out of his work during his lifetime.
Fouad Bendris's insight:
At the beginning of the twentieth century, the United States was an industrial and technological backwater. Still mostly an agrarian nation, bright young students would often go to Europe to pursue advanced degrees in the sciences, because American universities were considered second rate. By the end of the century though, the United States had become the center of the technological universe. Earning more Nobel Prizes in the sciences than any other country, we built unparalleled dominance in industries ranging from information technology to bioscience. US universities are now considered the finest in the world. Yet the new century poses unprecedented challenges. Globalization and other trends are creating a multi-polar world. A rising Asia, led by China, threatens to usurp American primacy while, at the same time entrepreneurship is at or near historic lows. If we are to win in this new century, we need to return to the values that made us dominant in the first place.
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To Find Meaning in Your Work, Change How You Think About It

To Find Meaning in Your Work, Change How You Think About It | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it

Purpose isn’t magic — it’s something we must consciously pursue and create. With the right approach, almost any job can be meaningful. Three ways to reframe your purpose :


- Connect work to service !

While everyone may not handle situations of life and death at work, we each do serve someone in what we do. Teachers can see every day the young lives they are shaping — and visualize the lasting impact they may have on the young lives they touch.


- Craft your work – and make work a craft !

In another sense of the term, this crafting was also a demonstration of treating work as craft — focusing on the skill needed to complete one’s work and dedicating oneself to perfecting those skills.


- Invest in positive relationships ! 

Who we work with is as important as what we do. Psychologist Martin Seligman (among others) has written extensively on the importance of relationships to happiness and fulfillment.


- Remember why you work ! 

Most of us don’t have the luxury of working solely for fun. We may enjoy our jobs, but we also work to earn money and pay bills. For most of us, work in and of itself is a meaningful act of service.


Fouad Bendris's insight:
Why is it that some people can be extraordinarily well-paid and work in pampered settings but feel empty, while others can work in the sewers of New York City and feel fulfilled? Part of the answer is purpose.For most people, purpose is built not found. Working with a sense of purpose day-in and day-out is an act of will that takes thoughtfulness and practice ... 
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To Reduce Burnout on Your Team, Give People a Sense of Control ! 

To Reduce Burnout on Your Team, Give People a Sense of Control !  | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it

Create a team charter ! 

Taking the time and making an effort to forge a written charter based on reciprocal agreements, if nothing else, creates a perception of some semblance of control. The very act of soliciting team members’ input reduces stress levels, giving them the feeling that they are, at the very least, heard. This also leads to team buy-in, proprietorship, and the feeling of responsibility for team performance and well-being.  

The charter should include these basic foundational tenets: 

-  I agree to be on time, realizing everyone’s time is limited and extremely valuable. 

- I agree to show respect to every other member of the team and give them the benefit of the doubt.

- I agree to give my best effort in accomplishing every task, the team’s mission, and our shared purpose. 

- I agree not to engage in any gossip about my team members and to put a stop to it if I encounter it. 

- I agree to communicate early and often pertaining to any time off needed for my personal life. 

- I agree to handle disputes, perceived offenses, or conflicts with dignity and professionalism.


Fouad Bendris's insight:
There’s no question or debate that workplace stress levels are at critical levels and are escalating. The American Institute of Stress (AIS) reveals that 80% of us feel stress on the job and almost half say they need help in managing that stress. The StressPulse survey by ComPsych, an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) provider, shows the main causes of that stress are: 1) workload (36%); 2) people issues (31%); 3) balancing professional and personal lives (20%); and 4) job security (8%). Team dynamics are also a big deal when it comes to workplace stress, in terms of the way teams operate and how team members interact with each other ... 
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To Handle Increased Stress, Build Your Resilience !

To Handle Increased Stress, Build Your Resilience ! | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it

Four ways to feel more in control:

- Reframe how you think about stress ... How we perceive stress can be just as important to how we handle it as the amount of stress we’re experiencing. Researchers at the University of Buffalo found that stressors, big and small, help us develop the skills to face other taxing or stressful circumstances in the future.

- Create a healthy relationship to control ... Being able to separate out what you can and cannot control is essential. When you’re overwhelmed, it’s easy to assume you can’t change your situation.

- Understand the root causes ... Take time to reflect on your personal context as well as the larger business and global context to better understand the root causes and possible ways to alleviate and avoid future stress.

- Link learning with action ... We can choose to see difficult circumstances as learn­ing opportunities rather than as a time to shut down. When we ask “What can I learn from this?” instead of “Why me?” we can shape the challenge to our advantage.

Fouad Bendris's insight:
Wherever you live or work, stress is on the rise. According to the International Labour Organization, workers in developed and developing countries are facing increasing strain at work. The onslaught of mounting stressors include global challenges, such as climate change, terrorism, and political turmoil – as well as personal and professional challenges, such as illnesses, job changes, and organizational restructuring. For many of us, the initial response to stress is to look for external fixes. We turn to productivity tools or apps that promise to help us manage mounting pressures or we look for ways to alleviate our discomfort: find a different job, hire a new employee to take on an increased workload, or switch careers. But these solutions are often temporary and ineffective. Managing stress over the long term requires cultivating your own resilience skills before seeking external solutions so that you can turn changes, stresses, and challenges into opportunities. These skills include adaptability, a healthy relationship to control, continual learning, having a sense of purpose, and knowing how to leverage support and appropriate resources.
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The Fastest Path to the CEO Job, According to a 10-Year Study

The Fastest Path to the CEO Job, According to a 10-Year Study | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it

Three moves can catapult your career !


Go Small to Go Big - The path to CEO rarely runs in a straight line; sometimes you have to move backward or sideways in order to get ahead. More than 60% of sprinters took a smaller role at some point in their career. They may have started something new within their company (by launching a new product or division, for example), moved to a smaller company to take on a greater set of responsibilities, or started their own business. In each case, they used the opportunity to build something from the ground up and make an outsize impact.


Make a Big Leap -  More than one-third of sprinters catapulted to the top by making “the big leap,” often in the first decade of their careers. These executives threw caution to the wind and said yes to opportunities even when the role was well beyond anything they’ve done previously and they didn’t feel fully prepared for the challenges ahead.


Inherit a Big Mess - It may feel counterintuitive, and a bit daunting, but one way to prove your CEO mettle is by inheriting a big mess. It could be an underperforming business unit, a failed product, or a bankruptcy — any major problem for the business that needs to be fixed fast. More than 30% of our sprinters led their teams through a big mess.

Fouad Bendris's insight:
Some people’s careers take off, while others’ take longer — or even stall out. Common wisdom says that the former attend elite MBA programs, land high-powered jobs right out of school at prestigious firms, and climb the ladder straight to the top, carefully avoiding risky moves. But our data shows a completely different picture. We conducted a 10-year study, which we call the CEO Genome Project, in which we assembled a data set of more than 17,000 C-suite executive assessments and studied 2,600 in-depth to analyze who gets to the top and how. We then took a closer look at “CEO sprinters” — those who reached the CEO role faster than the average of 24 years from their first job. We discovered a striking finding: Sprinters don’t accelerate to the top by acquiring the perfect pedigree. They do it by making bold career moves over the course of their career that catapult them to the top.
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NDAs Are Out of Control. Here’s What Needs to Change !

NDAs Are Out of Control. Here’s What Needs to Change ! | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it

They’re often unethical, unenforceable, and unfair.

Legislatures and courts should develop clearer boundaries about the enforceable scope of NDAs and should penalize employers that weaponize these contracts in a way that stifles speech and creativity. The law should make it clear that NDAs cannot expand upon the statutory definitions of trade secrecy to demand confidentiality about information that has little to do with a company’s innovative edge. Trade secret laws have already balanced the trade-offs inherent in fencing some types of information; these laws have weighed the risks and benefits, striking a reasonable policy bargain. Through education campaigns and policies that require employer transparency when drafting employment contract clauses, employees should be made aware of the limits of boilerplate language in their employment contracts.



Fouad Bendris's insight:
Nondisclosure agreements, or NDAs, which are increasingly common in employment contracts, suppress employee speech and chill creativity. The current revelations surfacing years of harassment in major organizations are merely the tip of the iceberg. New data shows that over one-third of the U.S. workforce is bound by an NDA. These contracts have grown not only in number but also in breadth. At the outset, NDAs attempt to impose several obligations upon a new employee. They demand silence, often broadly worded to protect against speaking up against corporate culture or saying anything that would portray the company and its executives in a negative light. NDAs also attempt to expand the definitions of secrecy to cover more information than the traditional bounds of trade secret law, in effect preventing an employee from leaving their employer and continuing to work in the same field ... 
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How Automation Will Change Work, Purpose, and Meaning

How Automation Will Change Work, Purpose, and Meaning | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it

We’ll have to find new ways to define ourselves !

Over the next 100 years, AI and robotic systems will increasingly dominate labor and work, producing necessities and the physical artifacts of human life, enabling more of us to ascend (Arendt did present this as ascending — this is a qualitative value judgment) to the realm of action. Of course, some people might engage in labor or work by choice, but choice is the essential distinction. Most ancient Greek philosophers prioritized contemplation over action as the pinnacle of human endeavor. Arendt did battle with this notion, arguing on behalf of action. Contemporary culture appears to agree. Ultimately, though, action and contemplation function best when allied. We have the opportunity — perhaps the responsibility — to turn our curiosity and social natures to action and contemplation ... 

Fouad Bendris's insight:
The vast majority of humans throughout history worked because they had to. Many found comfort, value, and meaning in their efforts, but some defined work as a necessity to be avoided if possible. For centuries, elites in societies from Europe to Asia aspired to absolution from gainful employment. Aristotle defined a “man in freedom” as the pinnacle of human existence, an individual freed of any concern for the necessities of life and with nearly complete personal agency.The promise of AI and automation raises new questions about the role of work in our lives. Most of us will remain focused for decades to come on activities of physical or financial production, but as technology provides services and goods at ever-lower cost, human beings will be compelled to discover new roles — roles that aren’t necessarily tied to how we conceive of work today ! 
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Barbara Lond's curator insight, January 28, 10:38 AM
The vast majority of humans throughout history worked because they had to. Many found comfort, value, and meaning in their efforts, but some defined work as a necessity to be avoided if possible. For centuries, elites in societies from Europe to Asia aspired to absolution from gainful employment. Aristotle defined a “man in freedom” as the pinnacle of human existence, an individual freed of any concern for the necessities of life and with nearly complete personal agency.The promise of AI and automation raises new questions about the role of work in our lives. Most of us will remain focused for decades to come on activities of physical or financial production, but as technology provides services and goods at ever-lower cost, human beings will be compelled to discover new roles — roles that aren’t necessarily tied to how we conceive of work today ! 
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Life begins at the end of your comfort zone ! 

Life begins at the end of your comfort zone !  | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it
The paradox in this inclination is that #CHANGE is the most enduring element of our lives ... 
Fouad Bendris's insight:
Life begins at the end of your comfort zone !
The paradox in this inclination is that #CHANGE is the most enduring element of our lives ... 
" The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot Learn, Unlearn, and Relearn" - Futurist Alvin Toffler 
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Artificial Intelligence Seeks An Ethical Conscience ! 

Artificial Intelligence Seeks An Ethical Conscience !  | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it

Some AI researchers are concerned by the field's power, and its ability to cause harm. A tutorial session hosted by Cornell and Berkeley professors in the cavernous main hall Monday focused on building fairness into machine-learning systems, a particular issue as governments increasingly tap AI software. It included a reminder for researchers of legal barriers, such as the Civil Rights and Genetic Information Nondiscrimination acts. One concern is that even when machine-learning systems are programmed to be blind to race or gender, for example, they may use other signals in data such as the location of a person’s home as a proxy for it.

Fouad Bendris's insight:
LEADING ARTIFICIAL-INTELLIGENCE RESEARCHERS gathered this week for the prestigious Neural Information Processing Systems conference have a new topic on their agenda. Alongside the usual cutting-edge research, panel discussions, and socializing: concern about AI’s power. Ultimately, AI researchers alone can’t and shouldn’t decide how society puts their ideas to use. “A lot of decisions about the future of this field cannot be made in the disciplines in which it began,” says Terah Lyons, executive director of Partnership on AI, a nonprofit launched last year by tech companies to mull the societal impacts of AI ! 
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Barbara Lond's curator insight, December 22, 2017 3:37 PM
LEADING ARTIFICIAL-INTELLIGENCE RESEARCHERS gathered this week for the prestigious Neural Information Processing Systems conference have a new topic on their agenda. Alongside the usual cutting-edge research, panel discussions, and socializing: concern about AI’s power. Ultimately, AI researchers alone can’t and shouldn’t decide how society puts their ideas to use. “A lot of decisions about the future of this field cannot be made in the disciplines in which it began,” says Terah Lyons, executive director of Partnership on AI, a nonprofit launched last year by tech companies to mull the societal impacts of AI ! 
Barbara Lond's curator insight, January 28, 10:39 AM
LEADING ARTIFICIAL-INTELLIGENCE RESEARCHERS gathered this week for the prestigious Neural Information Processing Systems conference have a new topic on their agenda. Alongside the usual cutting-edge research, panel discussions, and socializing: concern about AI’s power. Ultimately, AI researchers alone can’t and shouldn’t decide how society puts their ideas to use. “A lot of decisions about the future of this field cannot be made in the disciplines in which it began,” says Terah Lyons, executive director of Partnership on AI, a nonprofit launched last year by tech companies to mull the societal impacts of AI ! 
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The Most and Least Digital Jobs – and How Well They Pay ?

The Most and Least Digital Jobs – and How Well They Pay ? | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it

The more you use computers at work, the higher your pay.

You can see where your job and industry fell on that scale, as of 2016, using the interactive below. Once you select an occupation, you’ll see below the main chart how that score changed since 2002, as well as the change in average pay.

The researchers broke occupations into high, medium, and low use of digital, and found that highly digital occupations made $73,000, on average. Medium occupations made $48,000 and low occupations made just $30,000. To some extent, that’s due to the fact that more digital jobs are held by more highly educated people. However, the researchers found that, even after controlling for educational requirements, more digital jobs paid better — and that this premium had increased over the past decade. Of course, there are exceptions. If you click on one of the small orange dots floating in the middle of the interactive, you’ll notice a cluster of jobs all in one industry: health care. As of 2016, these occupations (anesthesiologists, dentists, internists, etc.) were highly paid but only moderately digital, which makes them outliers of a sort. But even if health care isn’t very digital, relatively speaking, it still saw one of the largest increases in digitization between 2002 and 2016. The widespread adoption of machine learning may accelerate this trend.

Fouad Bendris's insight:
In all likelihood, your job involves using computers – probably more so than it did a decade ago. In a recent study, researchers at Brookings attempted to quantify that change across the U.S. economy, using Department of Labor data on the digital requirements of 545 different occupations. They found that 95% of those occupations became more digital between 2002 and 2016, meaning that computers became a more important part of the job. The researchers combined several measures of an occupation’s use of digital technology into a digital score, ranging from zero (least digital) to 100 (most digital).
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Barbara Lond's curator insight, December 22, 2017 3:37 PM
In all likelihood, your job involves using computers – probably more so than it did a decade ago. In a recent study, researchers at Brookings attempted to quantify that change across the U.S. economy, using Department of Labor data on the digital requirements of 545 different occupations. They found that 95% of those occupations became more digital between 2002 and 2016, meaning that computers became a more important part of the job. The researchers combined several measures of an occupation’s use of digital technology into a digital score, ranging from zero (least digital) to 100 (most digital).
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Age Diversity and Innovation Teams ! 

Age Diversity and Innovation Teams !  | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it
Homogeneity in innovation teams… is generally a bad idea In the case of age, teams dominated by experience can find it harder to challenge givens and norms. They are also susceptible to confirmation and functional fixedness biases fueled by common experience. As a result they may move teams too quickly from ideation into execution and delivery. Age and Scientific Creativity A common assumption is that innovation is a young person’s game. Indeed, Max Planck said “Science advances one death at a time” and Einstein once commented that “a person who has not made his great contribution to science before the age of thirty will never do so”.
Fouad Bendris's insight:
Diversity is good for innovation. Integrating different backgrounds, fields of expertise, depths and breadths of knowledge and experience all help to create new interfaces where innovative ideas can spark and thrive. Likewise, diverse thinking styles and personality types help foster balance between ideation, creativity, execution and delivery. There are lot’s of ways to increase diversity, but should this include age?
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Barbara Lond's curator insight, December 22, 2017 3:38 PM
Diversity is good for innovation. Integrating different backgrounds, fields of expertise, depths and breadths of knowledge and experience all help to create new interfaces where innovative ideas can spark and thrive. Likewise, diverse thinking styles and personality types help foster balance between ideation, creativity, execution and delivery. There are lot’s of ways to increase diversity, but should this include age?
Barbara Lond's curator insight, January 28, 10:41 AM
Diversity is good for innovation. Integrating different backgrounds, fields of expertise, depths and breadths of knowledge and experience all help to create new interfaces where innovative ideas can spark and thrive. Likewise, diverse thinking styles and personality types help foster balance between ideation, creativity, execution and delivery. There are lot’s of ways to increase diversity, but should this include age?
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Why Agile Learners are Ideal for Innovation !

Why Agile Learners are Ideal for Innovation ! | Strategy & Governance | Scoop.it
People who are learning agile: 
– Seek out experiences to learn from. 
– Enjoy complex problems and challenges associated with new experiences. 
– Get more out of those experiences because they have an interest in making sense of them. 
– Perform better because they incorporate new skills into their repertoire. 
A person who is learning agile has more lessons, more tools, and more solutions to draw on when faced with new business challenges. Achieving to instill these from my innovation capability work, coaching and mentoring would be ideal, it is a way to seek out and learn innovation. Agile learners are potentially ideal for what is needed to manage innovation. Of course, each of the learning agility profiles has a specific combination of strengths and developmental needs but I do like these generalized statements, it does sum up agility for me and fit in what I believe innovators need.
Fouad Bendris's insight:
Agility holds a special interest for me. I named my consulting business Agility Innovation Specialists and constantly am looking to emphasize that agility is really important to managing innovation.
Learning agility is a reliable indicator of potential for leadership roles. Why? Learning agile individuals excel at absorbing information from their experiences and then extrapolating from those to navigate unfamiliar situations. They are often described as flexible, resourceful, adaptable, and thoughtful—in short, an ideal fit for mission-critical roles”
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Barbara Lond's curator insight, January 28, 10:42 AM
Agility holds a special interest for me. I named my consulting business Agility Innovation Specialists and constantly am looking to emphasize that agility is really important to managing innovation.
Learning agility is a reliable indicator of potential for leadership roles. Why? Learning agile individuals excel at absorbing information from their experiences and then extrapolating from those to navigate unfamiliar situations. They are often described as flexible, resourceful, adaptable, and thoughtful—in short, an ideal fit for mission-critical roles”