Storage of Data
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Storage of Data
Throughout the Decades!
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Sweeping the world one computer at a time!

NAND flash memory was developed in themid 80'sby Toshiba, and USB flash drives were developed in the late 90's. The break-though was the ability to connect flash memory to a computer and it be a “virtual” storage drive without the need for drivers or special software.
Other companies were starting to manufacture their own. By the time USB flash drives began to really catch on with computer users, the 128 Megabyte version was the most common.

The companies that claim to have originated the USB flash drive have been unable to protect their claims.
Their storage capacity continues to increase. While the early versions could hold 8-128 Megabyte, now 32 and 64 Gigabyte flash drives are common and 128 Gigabyte drives are available. Prices have fallen rapidly as well. When introduced, a 128 Megabyte flash drive would cost around $30. Now you can buy an 8 Gigabyte USB Flash Drive for usually $20 less!

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Floppy disk the new new!

Floppy disk the new new! | Storage of Data | Scoop.it

The diskette, or floppy disk (named so because they were flexible), was invented by IBM and in common use from the mid-1970s to the late 1990s. The first floppy disks were 8 inches, and later in came 5.25 and 3.5-inch formats. The first floppy disk, introduced in 1971, had a capacity of 79.7 kB, and was read-only. A read-write version came a year later.

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Hard Drive on a roll

Hard Drive on a roll | Storage of Data | Scoop.it

The first hard disk drive was the IBM Model 350 Disk File that came with the IBM 305 RAMAC computer in 1970. It had 50 24-inch discs with a total storage capacity of 5 million characters (just under 5 MB).

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Punched tape the new wave of storage!

Punched tape the new wave of storage! | Storage of Data | Scoop.it

Same as with punch cards, punched tape was originally pioneered by the textile industry for use with mechanized looms. For computers, punch tape could be used for data input but also as a medium to output data. Each row on the tape represented one character.

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A new technology on the rise

A new technology on the rise | Storage of Data | Scoop.it

With the Selectron Tube showing that there was much to improve IBM created the RAMAC 305 Hardrive. The 4096-bit Selectron was 10 inches long and 3 inches wide. Developed in 1946, the memory storage device proved expensive and suffered from production problems, so it never became a success.

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Compact Cassette the top for storage!

Compact Cassette the top for storage! | Storage of Data | Scoop.it

And of course, I can’t forget mentioning the standard compact cassette, which was a popular way of data storage for personal computers in the late 70s and 80s. Typical data rates for compact cassettes were 2,000 bit/s. You could store about 660 kB per side on a 90-minute tape.

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To the movies!

To the movies! | Storage of Data | Scoop.it

It was mainly used for movies. The first commercially available laserdisc system was available on the market late in 1978 (then called Laser Videodisc and the more hippy branded DiscoVision) and were 11.81 inches (30 cm) in diameter. The discs could have up to 60 minutes of audio/video on each side. The first laserdiscs had entirely analog content. The basic technology behind laserdiscs was invented all the way back in 1958.

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The bigger the better!

The bigger the better! | Storage of Data | Scoop.it

Invented all the way back in 1932 in Austrailia, it was widely used in the 1980s as the main working memory of computers. In the mid-1980s, magnetic drum memory had a capacity of around 10 kB.

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Punch Cards Take the 1970s!

Punch Cards Take the 1970s! | Storage of Data | Scoop.it

Early computers often used punch cards for input both of programs and data. Punch cards were in common use until the mid-1970s. It should be noted that the use of punch cards predates computers. They were used as early as 1725 in the textile industry (for controlling mechanized textile looms).

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Light at the end of the tunnel

Until the late 1940s no technology had been discovered to store data efficiently.  Folders and file cabinets had been some of the major things used. But on 1946 the Selectron Tube had been invented.

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