Stone Soup
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Stone Soup
"Some travelers come to a village, carrying nothing more than an empty cooking pot. Upon their arrival, the villagers are unwilling to share any of their food stores with the hungry travelers. Then the travelers go to a stream and fill the pot with water, drop a large stone in it, and place it over a fire. One of the villagers becomes curious and asks what they are doing?. The travelers answer that they are making "stone soup", which tastes wonderful, although it still needs a little bit of garnish to improve the flavor, which they are missing. The villager does not mind parting with a few carrots to help them out, so that gets added to the soup. Another villager walks by, inquiring about the pot, and the travelers again mention their stone soup which has not reached its full potential yet. The villager hands them a little bit of seasoning to help them out. More and more villagers walk by, each adding another ingredient. Finally, a delicious and nourishing pot of soup is enjoyed by all." Wikipedia<br><br>My added ingredients on a number of topics of personal interest.
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Internet Conversations Have Gone Astray

Internet Conversations Have Gone Astray | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
Donald Schwartz's insight:

Time to return to the days of yesteryear. Once there were real conversations on the World Wide Web--there can be again. Comments are insufficient.

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Ten search engines for researchers that go beyond Google

Using search engines effectively is now a key skill for researchers, but could more be done to equip young researchers with the tools they need. Here, Dr Neil Jacobs and Rachel Bruce from Jisc’s digital infrastructure team share their top ten resources for researchers from across the web.
Donald Schwartz's insight:

Always more than one way to go. 

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Unintended Consequences of Sexual Harassment Scandals

Unintended Consequences of Sexual Harassment Scandals | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
Research shows trusted work relationships are crucial to career advancement, but some male leaders are getting skittish around female colleagues.
Donald Schwartz's insight:

It's complicated, now, more than ever. 

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High-Dimensional Quantum Encryption Performed in Real-World City Conditions for First Time

High-Dimensional Quantum Encryption Performed in Real-World City Conditions for First Time | Stone Soup | Scoop.it

For the first time, researchers have sent a quantum-secured message containing more than one bit of information per photon through the air above a city. The demonstration showed that it could one day be practical to use high-capacity, free-space quantum communication to create a highly secure link between ground-based networks and satellites, a requirement for creating a global quantum encryption network.
 
Quantum encryption uses photons to encode information in the form of quantum bits. In its simplest form, known as 2D encryption, each photon encodes one bit: either a one or a zero. Scientists have shown that a single photon can encode even more information — a concept known as high-dimensional quantum encryption — but until now this has never been demonstrated with free-space optical communication in real-world conditions. With eight bits necessary to encode just one letter, for example, packing more information into each photon would significantly speed up data transmission.
 
“Our work is the first to send messages in a secure manner using high-dimensional quantum encryption in realistic city conditions, including turbulence,” said research team lead, Ebrahim Karimi, University of Ottawa, Canada. “The secure, free-space communication scheme we demonstrated could potentially link Earth with satellites, securely connect places where it is too expensive to install fiber, or be used for encrypted communication with a moving object, such as an airplane.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Donald Schwartz's insight:

A hackless encryption system? A JOY JOY!

 

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Projecting a visual image directly into the brain, bypassing the eyes

Projecting a visual image directly into the brain, bypassing the eyes | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
Imagine replacing a damaged eye with a window directly into the brain — one that communicates with the visual part of the cerebral cortex by reading from a million individual neurons and simultaneously stimulating 1,000 of them with single-cell accuracy, allowing someone to see again.

That’s the goal of a $21.6 million DARPA award to the University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley), one of six organizations funded by DARPA’s Neural Engineering System Design program announced this week to develop implantable, biocompatible neural interfaces that can compensate for visual or hearing deficits.*

The UCB researchers ultimately hope to build a device for use in humans. But the researchers’ goal during the four-year funding period is more modest: to create a prototype to read and write to the brains of model organisms — allowing for neural activity and behavior to be monitored and controlled simultaneously. These organisms include zebrafish larvae, which are transparent, and mice, via a transparent window in the skull.

 

“The ability to talk to the brain has the incredible potential to help compensate for neurological damage caused by degenerative diseases or injury,” said project leader Ehud Isacoff, a UC Berkeley professor of molecular and cell biology and director of the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute. “By encoding perceptions into the human cortex, you could allow the blind to see or the paralyzed to feel touch.”

 

To communicate with the brain, the team will first insert a gene into neurons that makes fluorescent proteins, which flash when a cell fires an action potential. This will be accompanied by a second gene that makes a light-activated “optogenetic” protein, which stimulates neurons in response to a pulse of light.

 

To read, the team is developing a miniaturized “light field microscope.” Mounted on a small window in the skull, it peers through the surface of the brain to visualize up to a million neurons at a time at different depths and monitor their activity. This microscope is based on the revolutionary “light field camera,” which captures light through an array of lenses and reconstructs images computationally in any focus.

 

The combined read-write function will eventually be used to directly encode perceptions into the human cortex — inputting a visual scene to enable a blind person to see. The goal is to eventually enable physicians to monitor and activate thousands to millions of individual human neurons using light.

 

Isacoff, who specializes in using optogenetics to study the brain’s architecture, can already successfully read from thousands of neurons in the brain of a larval zebrafish, using a large microscope that peers through the transparent skin of an immobilized fish, and simultaneously write to a similar number.

 

The team will also develop computational methods that identify the brain activity patterns associated with different sensory experiences, hoping to learn the rules well enough to generate “synthetic percepts” — meaning visual images representing things being touched — by a person with a missing hand, for example. This technology has a lot of potential in the future.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Donald Schwartz's insight:

Science fiction no more. Now this is what I call visualization.

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Hand-Held Journalism in Harrowing Times

Hand-Held Journalism in Harrowing Times | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
Hearing from some citizen journalists campaigning for the free flow of information, a focus of films like “City of Ghosts,” “Copwatch” and “Cambodian Spring.”
Donald Schwartz's insight:

How this will shape our future is anyone's guess: I hope for the better. The problem is "how " to find it amidst all the noise. 

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Here's A Few Simple Experiments You Can Do Yourself To Show That The Earth Is Round

Here's A Few Simple Experiments You Can Do Yourself To Show That The Earth Is Round | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
Even though we've known for thousands of years that the earth is a sphere, there are still some people out there who are convinced that it's flat. Here are
Donald Schwartz's insight:

The people who need to see this probably won't--I feel like I'm putting a message in a bottle and casting it on the ocean.

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Mind-Reading Algorithm Recognizes Faces

Mind-Reading Algorithm Recognizes Faces | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
Technology Networks is an internationally recognised publisher that provides access to the latest scientific news, products, research, videos and posters.
Donald Schwartz's insight:

 

"The central insight of the new work is that even though there exist an infinite number of different possible faces, our brain needs only about 200 neurons to uniquely encode any face, with each neuron encoding a specific dimension, or axis, of facial variability." DS: great news as to "why" we may never forget a face.

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The Doctor Is In. Co-Pay? $40,000.

The Doctor Is In. Co-Pay? $40,000. | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
For five-figure annual fees, boutique medical services offer the wealthiest Americans the chance to cut the line and receive the best treatment.
Donald Schwartz's insight:

In my view, this cannot be painted as a "class warfare" issue because  it represents something far larger and potentially of greater concern when considering our personal healthcare.

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Opinion | I Flirt and Tweet. Follow Me at #Socialbot.

Opinion | I Flirt and Tweet. Follow Me at #Socialbot. | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
Socialbots are being designed to sway elections, to influence the stock market, even to flirt with people and one another.
Donald Schwartz's insight:

Before "fake new."

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HOME WALL DECOR:

HOME WALL DECOR: | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
I am a designer, sooner or later I'll figure this stuff out. 
ADOBE CERTIFIED ASSOCIATE in Graphic Design & Illustration. 
Donald Schwartz's insight:

Finally A R T(uhm) what will match your couch.

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Microsoft is 'deeply' focused on driving LinkedIn revenue — not necessarily the bottom line, CFO says

Microsoft is 'deeply' focused on driving LinkedIn revenue — not necessarily the bottom line, CFO says | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
"You want to keep the core growing and they're doing a great job of that," chief financial officer Amy Hood said.
Donald Schwartz's insight:

To those of you who follow this sort of thing... Oh, and Clippy is back

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Say Hello to Robot Marriage: A French Woman is Engaged to a Robot and Wants to Marry it

Say Hello to Robot Marriage: A French Woman is Engaged to a Robot and Wants to Marry it | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
Say Hello to Robot Marriage! Lilly's story is the first one ever. A French woman named as Lilly wants to marry a robot.. Robot Marriage may be soon possible

Via TechinBiz
Donald Schwartz's insight:

If they really accomplish their goal of putting science back in SCI-FI, I'm all in.

 

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inningexperts's comment, January 11, 2017 6:01 AM
Fabulous
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If you thought spacial entanglement was weird, check out entanglement of 'time'

If you thought spacial entanglement was weird, check out entanglement of 'time' | Stone Soup | Scoop.it

In the summer of 1935, the physicists Albert Einstein and Erwin Schrödinger engaged in a rich, multifaceted and sometimes fretful correspondence about the implications of the new theory of quantum mechanics. The focus of their worry was what Schrödinger later dubbed entanglement: the inability to describe two quantum systems or particles independently, after they have interacted.

 

Until his death, Einstein remained convinced that entanglement showed how quantum mechanics was incomplete. Schrödinger thought that entanglement was the defining feature of the new physics, but this didn’t mean that he accepted it lightly. ‘I know of course how the hocus pocus works mathematically,’ he wrote to Einstein on 13 July 1935. ‘But I do not like such a theory.’

 

Schrödinger’s famous cat, suspended between life and death, first appeared in these letters, a byproduct of the struggle to articulate what bothered the pair.

 

The problem is that entanglement violates how the world ought to work. Information can’t travel faster than the speed of light, for one. But in a 1935 paper, Einstein and his co-authors showed how entanglement leads to what’s now called quantum nonlocality, the eerie link that appears to exist between entangled particles. If two quantum systems meet and then separate, even across a distance of thousands of lightyears, it becomes impossible to measure the features of one system (such as its position, momentum and polarity) without instantly steering the other into a corresponding state. 

 

Up to today, most experiments have tested entanglement over spatial gaps. The assumption is that the ‘nonlocal’ part of quantum nonlocality refers to the entanglement of properties across space. But what if entanglement also occurs across time? Is there such a thing as temporal nonlocality?

 

The answer, as it turns out, is "yes". Just when you thought quantum mechanics couldn’t get any weirder, a team of physicists at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem reported in 2013 that they had successfully entangled photons that never coexisted. Previous experiments involving a technique called ‘entanglement swapping’ had already showed quantum correlations across time, by delaying the measurement of one of the coexisting entangled particles; but Eli Megidish and his collaborators were the first to show entanglement between photons whose lifespans did not overlap at all.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Donald Schwartz's insight:

This may require multiple readings, but imagine I will be rewarded.

 

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Just How Little Do We Know about the Ocean Floor?

Just How Little Do We Know about the Ocean Floor? | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
Less than 0.05 percent of the ocean floor has been mapped to a level of detail useful for detecting items such as airplane wreckage or the spires of undersea volcanic vents
Donald Schwartz's insight:

In our own backyard and we're missing it. 

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James Webb Space Telescope Launch and Deployment

Northrop Grumman is proud to lead the industry team building NASA's James Webb Space Telescope. This revolutionary observatory is the largest telescop
Donald Schwartz's insight:

Regrettably, the level of deployment complexity may necessitate a visit to a craft that was not designed for it nor will it be in location that will be easy to reach. Of course we can hope that everything will go as planned. 

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When Will the Planet Be Too Hot for Humans? Much, Much Sooner Than You Imagine.

When Will the Planet Be Too Hot for Humans? Much, Much Sooner Than You Imagine. | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
Plague, famine, heat no human can survive. What scientists, when they’re not being cautious, fear climate change could do to our future.
Donald Schwartz's insight:

Yeah, I'd say we should be going off-world into a golden land of opportunity but who is to say that we wouldn't do it all again?

 

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The Word Choices That Explain Why Jane Austen Endures

The Word Choices That Explain Why Jane Austen Endures | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
There’s a way to measure the acute emotional intelligence that has never gone out of style.
Donald Schwartz's insight:

The graph didn't help me understand much, but this paragraph clarified and elucidated quite a lot: "It is at the heart of Austen’s work: What is going on behind the veneer that politeness demands? These distinctive words, word clusters and grammatical constructions highlight her writerly preoccupations: states of mind and feeling, her characters’ unceasing efforts to understand themselves and other people." 

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How to Fix Gerrymandering: Make State Legislatures Bigger

How to Fix Gerrymandering: Make State Legislatures Bigger | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
This week, the Supreme Court agreed to take up the case of Gill v. Whitford, whose plaintiffs claim the electoral boundaries drawn up by the GOP-contr
Donald Schwartz's insight:

Hopefully neither party will respond well to some of the emerging ideas as to how to restore our democracy? 

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If a nuclear bomb is dropped on your city, here's where you should run and hide

If a nuclear bomb is dropped on your city, here's where you should run and hide | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
Scientists have figured out when and where you should go to avoid radioactive fallout.
Donald Schwartz's insight:

What ever happened to: Duck and Cover?

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How brains recognise faces

How brains recognise faces | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
Looking at a couple of hundred neurons is enough to reconstruct the image of a face that a monkey is looking at, new research has found. Andrew Masterson
Donald Schwartz's insight:

Our Facial Recognition Schema: "We had always thought face cells were more complex. But it turns out each one is just measuring distance along a single axis of face space, and is blind to other features.”

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Anthropology Inc.

Anthropology Inc. | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
Forget online surveys and dinnertime robo-calls. A consulting firm called ReD is at the forefront of a new trend in market research, treating the everyday lives of consumers as a subject worthy of social-science scrutiny. On behalf of its corporate clients, ReD will uncover your deepest needs, fears, and desires.
Donald Schwartz's insight:

Where to find "true" social media experts.

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Physicists breed Schrödinger’s cats to find boundaries of the quantum realm

Physicists breed Schrödinger’s cats to find boundaries of the quantum realm | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
Scientists hope to find the dividing line between quantum mechanics and common-sense reality. Cathal O'Connell reports.
Donald Schwartz's insight:

Why a cat I ask you?

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Hyperloop One Just Released 11 Possible Routes for Its Futuristic Transport System

Hyperloop One Just Released 11 Possible Routes for Its Futuristic Transport System | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
Hyperloop One is considering eleven different route proposals in the United States.
Donald Schwartz's insight:

Wanna bet the US of A is the last civilized country to adopt this form of transportation? I can see a whole slew of vested interests doing their best to kill it or at least slow down its adoption.

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Ten search engines for researchers that go beyond Google

Ten search engines for researchers that go beyond Google | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
  Using search engines effectively is now a key skill for researchers, but could more be done to equip young researchers with the tools the
Donald Schwartz's insight:

Get you alt.search engines while they're hot. Last time I looked, I don't recall them all being free.

 

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‘Duck Dynasty’ vs. ‘Modern Family’: 50 Maps of the U.S. Cultural Divide

‘Duck Dynasty’ vs. ‘Modern Family’: 50 Maps of the U.S. Cultural Divide | Stone Soup | Scoop.it
Americans have been clustering themselves into cultural bubbles just as they have clustered in political bubbles.
Donald Schwartz's insight:

Way more significant than you are what you eat--politically speaking you are what you watch.

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