Stephanie's Architecture Blog
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Stephanie's Architecture Blog
This is my blog expressing my interest in architecture!!! Hope you enjoy it!!! :)
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Architecture by Robots, For Humanity

Architecture by Robots, For Humanity | Stephanie's Architecture Blog | Scoop.it
Courtesy of blog.rhino3d.com - ROB/Arch Workshop, Rotterdam Architecture is quickly adopting the popular technology of robots. Although it is slightly
Stephanie_A's insight:

As the years go on, architecture is getting more advanced and is rapidly embracing the now widespread technology of robots. There is no specific definition on what a robot means in architecture, but when spoken of it is basically referring to a programmable, mechanical and automated instrument used to assist in processes such as digital fabrication. A few examples of these machines are robot arms, CNC mills and even 3D printers. So, how do robots actually impact architecture? And what might they mean for architecture? For one, robots, can lead to a more precise architectural job, which could lead to a more efficient and sustainable structure. Robots can also help create more intricate and innovative designs. This can evolve and even enhance architecture to create the unimaginable and allow people’s dreams to become reality. These designs would be derived from algorithmic processes to create a well-organized and effective prefabrication process that could lessen the time and total cost of construction. Another question that comes up with introducing robots to an architect’s world is what can robots do for humans? I believe that there are always pros and cons to every situation and with this one in particular, you might be thinking that these robots are taking construction workers jobs. Although, if you think of what these robots are capable of, and the work that they could do that we as humans weren’t able to do before, I think it’s a positive addition. It will be interesting to see what the future hold for these robots in the architecture world.

 

 

Molloy, Jonathan C. "Architecture by Robots, For Humanity." ArchDaily. N.p., 29 Mar. 2013. Web. 30 Mar. 2013.

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Marco Longinotti-Buitoni's comment, April 1, 2013 9:20 PM
For our scoop it project, Stephanie and I share the same professions as topics. After reading "Architecture by Robots, For Humanity" by Jonathan C. Molloy, I thought that it was very intellectual and that it could have made a lot of sense in my assignment. This article is a good one for a project on architecture for a few reasons. One big reason is that it will be a very effective idea and might have to do with many future architectures. An other reason is that the report talks about how much different work will be with robots doing most of the hard labor. The calculations will be more precise, the safety rate during work will be higher, and it will be an easier process than before. These variables are usually a big concern for many architects today, so having a big change like this could change the career gravely. I think that this article was written to inform people about the future of technology, architecture and safety and in my opinion, it was a very logical piece of writing to read after learning about the many difficulties someone in the career has to face.
Sophia Laino's comment, April 7, 2013 7:59 PM
The article that Stephanie chose "Architecture by Robots, For Humanity" is a very good sense of what the architectural world is coming to. Even though there is no direct definition for robots we can still see what they are beginning to develop into. Robots range from anything to a 3D printer to the Roomba. Robots in the architectural world are becoming more and more relevant to us. This is because they are able to do many more things that we can not. For example, they are able to work twenty-four hours a day and seven days a week. Also, they can do more precise work than us. So not only will it be saying people time and precision on projects it will also be saving them the money that they don't have to pay on workers. Stephanie has a strong point that every situation has pros and cons. She pointed out a big one in this case. She pointed out that many of the robots will be taking peoples jobs away. That may be a problem with our economy now. Therefore, we can only wait for the future to come. I think Stephanie has a clear cut mind making her capable to really go far in this career field.
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The Architecture of Happiness By Alain de Botton - Books - Review - New York Times

The Architecture of Happiness By Alain de Botton - Books - Review - New York Times | Stephanie's Architecture Blog | Scoop.it
Alain de Botton contemplates the qualities of beautiful buildings.
Stephanie_A's insight:

With billions of people on this earth, each with their own style and taste, there’s bound to be numerous disagreements of taste whether it be about visual arts, poetry or even music. For example, people have their own preference on what type of music they enjoy listening to. However, architecture is a bit different. It’s an essential piece of public art. If two completely different structures were built next to each other, or even across the street from each other, you’re forced to look at it whether you like it or not. Architecture has the ability to transform a boring hometown into an exuberant cultural capital. Is it possible for the right kind of architecture to change our character or emotions? These questions and ideas are the sort of reflections that are in Alain de Botton’s new book, “The Architecture of Happiness.” For De Botton, a young author, the answers to his questions, used to be obvious. A beautiful building captured certain abstract ideals and perfectly followed the rules of classical orders set in Roman times during the Renaissance. De Botton believes that different architecture embodies and hints at aspects of humans and their emotions, conveying either one extreme or another. Alain de Botton has some very good points that bring up many questions about the impact that architecture has on the public. He thinks about and analyzes all aspects of architecture which I find very fascinating. I would love to read his book and learn more about his ideas.

 

 

Holt, Jim. "Dream Houses." The New York Times. The New York Times, 10 Dec. 2006. Web. 28 Mar. 2013.

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RIBA/Observer Panel Discussion: Are Tall Buildings Blighting our Skyline?

RIBA/Observer Panel Discussion: Are Tall Buildings Blighting our Skyline? | Stephanie's Architecture Blog | Scoop.it
Stephanie_A's insight:

London, regardless of their recession is undergoing an architectural trend of tall buildings. Now a day, London’s architects are being pressured to build more and more apartments, offices, stores etc. The tall building rage is being coerced by foreign money and their egos. Buildings after buildings are being approved and constructed at astounding rates and are overriding the city. More towers; tall buildings are taking over and now record holding buildings are being rivaled with new and upcoming constructions. London Bridge is home to Europe’s tallest building and now new buildings in places such as the South Bank and Vauxhall and others are rapidly becoming competition for the city. With many new and profusely tall building being constructed left and right, there are some worries that it can alter the city’s character forever. The structures can captivate and mesmerize its citizens, as well as having the ability to inspire and influence the new generation. London is left to ask the question of, whether their planning system is working or not. They need to decide either they are enhancing or slowly destroying their capital. It’s interesting to hear of the architectural differences throughout the world. You see here the kind of impact that architecture can have and how overtime it can drastically affect the city. I personally think it will be fascinating to see years from now how this situation turns out.

 

 

"RIBA/Observer Panel Discussion: Are Tall Buildings Blighting Our Skyline?" RIBA. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Mar. 2013.

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Architects : Occupational Outlook Handbook : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Architects : Occupational Outlook Handbook : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics | Stephanie's Architecture Blog | Scoop.it
Architects plan and design buildings and other structures.
Stephanie_A's insight:

In a place such as New York City, everywhere you go, you see buildings, places to eat, work, shop, live, play and many more. Well, Architects are the ones responsible for providing such places. Their job is to collaborate with their clients to discuss the objectives, requirements and the budget of the current project. Some architects, by calculating a building’s future users, might also have to figure out a building’s space requirements. In the process of creating, designing and constructing a building, architects must estimate the amount of materials and tools needed for the construction as well as figuring out how long it will take to finish.  They have to instruct, complete and prepare scale drawing and documents in addition to supervising the construction site and prepare contracts and paperwork. After forming plans on the buildings appearance, architects might consult with civil engineers to create and construct drawings for the structural systems of the building like the air-conditioning, heat, ventilation, electrical system plumbing etc. While seeing their imagination come to life, architects must follow the rules and regulations of the area, such as zoning laws and fire regulations and always think about the public’s perspective. I myself am actually very involved in visual arts and found the different steps of the job of an architect very interesting. I can only imagine how amazing it must feel when someone’s dream has been completed and has come to life. 

 

 

"Summary." U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 31 Aug. 2012. Web. 28 Mar. 2013.

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Nora Caliban's comment, April 1, 2013 9:01 PM
As Stephanie said, New York City is filled with architecture. It is all around us. This article provided readers with a close insight to what the process of creating these masterpieces looks like. Stephanie explained this process in her insight with great detail yet made it very easy to understand.

Before I read this article and Stephanie’s insight, I was unaware of everything an architect had to do in order to make their project come to life. They surely have a lot on of responsibility in them. From collaborating with clients about the project to preparing scale drawings, architects work very vey hard. I can only imagine how busy and at some points stressful the job of being an architect can be. However, it looks extremely rewarding and exciting. I think Stephanie did a great job summarizing the main points of the article and putting her own thoughts into it by relating it to her own life. With her talent, I could see her being a great architect someday. I completely agree with what she had to say in her insight. As Stephanie said, it must be truly amazing when someone’s dream has been completed and has come to life.
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Career Information: Architects

Career Information: Architects | Stephanie's Architecture Blog | Scoop.it
Detailed career information for Architects including salary, job outlook, employment opportunities and career training programs.
Stephanie_A's insight:

In the United States, the majority of the states require that architects have achieved a professional degree from any of the 117 degree programs recognized by the National Architectural Accrediting Board also known as the NAAB. It can take anywhere from five years to as little as one year depending on the previous training in architecture for a student to earn their professional degree. Those who are sure of their career in architecture can choose to pursue a five year long journey to earn their professional degree, which will ultimately lead to a path of greater success. Some areas important for an architect to master or know of are architectural history and theory, technology, structure, construction methods, math, physical science etc. Graduates are required in the United States to have no less than three years of training before they are allowed to take a licensing exam. Graduates tend to make a living by working under the supervision of a licensed architect before receiving their own license. Advancing as an architect can lead to complex assignments where you are put in a managerial position, some become partners in a firm while others take on their own practices. This article was very informative and should be of help to any aspiring architects. I found it interesting to learn of the process to jump start ones career as an architect. And it seems like with the proper education, any architect can go far with their career.

 

 

"Training, Other Qualifications and Advancement for Architects." Career Information: Campus Explorer. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Mar. 2013.

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Toyo Ito Wins the Pritzker Architecture Prize

Toyo Ito Wins the Pritzker Architecture Prize | Stephanie's Architecture Blog | Scoop.it
Toyo Ito, who designed a library that survived Japan’s disastrous 2011 earthquake, has won his field’s top honor.
Stephanie_A's insight:

Breaking from modernism, Toyo Ito, a Japanese architect designed a library in 2001 that miraculously survived Japan’s 2011 earthquake. His design was awarded the Pritzker Architecture Prize this past Sunday. Mr. Ito is known for creating timeless, but bold, new and innovative buildings. Mr. Ito expressed his gratitude for his award especially since it represents the acceptance of his position as an iconoclast challenging the past 100 years of modernism. He believes that Modernism has reached its limit or even perhaps a dead end. Either way, Toyo Ito said that he didn’t expect this surprising news of his award and is extremely happy. Toyo Ito will be receiving his award in Boston on May 29 at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum. Looking back at his career as an architect, Mr. Ito said that he is acutely pleased at his creation, Sendai Mediatheque (the library mentioned earlier), he is also proud of the building’s ability to withstand the earthquake. Toyo Ito has won his share of awards and has expressed his opinion of living in the now and not worrying about his status as an architect or any architecture competition. It’s amazing that his design is still standing to this day despite the devastating earthquake in Japan back in 2011. From this article, I get the impression that Mr. Ito is a very humble man who has done some very intricate and unique work and has been profoundly recognized for it.

 

 

Pogrebin, Robin. "Architectural Iconoclast Wins the Pritzker Prize." Nytimes.com. N.p., 17 Mar. 2013. Web. 28 Mar. 2013.

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Antoni Gaudí Biography

Antoni Gaudí Biography | Stephanie's Architecture Blog | Scoop.it
Learn about Antoni Gaud, the Spanish architect known for his unprecedented juxtapositions of geometric masses, on Biography.com.
Stephanie_A's insight:

Antoni Gaudi, born June 25, 1825, son of a coppersmith had an interest in architecture starting at a very young age. He grew up and attended a school in Catalonia, Barcelona on the Mediterranean coast of Spain. Gaudi graduated from the Provincial School of Architecture in 1878 after his studies had been disrupted by his enrolment in the military.  He quickly learned the skills of being an architect and developing his own style consisting of geometric masses and animations with patterns made up of colorful bricks, stones, ceramic tiles and metal work. In 1902 Antonio Gaudi created a unique structural technique, equilibrated, that has the ability to stand by its self, without the need for any internal braces or external buttressing. Gaudi, using this method created two famous Barcelona apartment buildings which is a prime example of his unique style. The floors of these two buildings were constructed to give the appearance of clustered lily pads. During his early years, Gaudi was lucky enough to be put in charge of Barcelona’s cathedral called Basilica I Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Familia. The building was up and coming and was in the mist of construction but Gaudi put his own style into the cathedral and completely changed its design. During the rest of his life, Antoni Gaudi has created more unique designs and buildings growing as an architect and becoming known to a wider variety of the public. It’s amazing to see the impact that he has made on Barcelona’s architecture. It’s also interesting to know that he had a love for architecture since he was young and lived out his dream all throughout his life. Reading his life story is truly an inspiration.

 

 

"Antoni Gaudí Biography." Bio.com. A&E Networks Television, n.d. Web. 27 Mar. 2013.

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