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Small Solar Electric Systems

Small Solar Electric Systems | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
A small solar electric or photovoltaic (PV) system can be a reliable and pollution-free producer of electricity for your home or office. Small PV systems also provide a cost-effective power supply in
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STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming
STEM (Science Technology Education & Mathematics) K-20  education models and innovations
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A History of Innovation: Pioneering Achievements of Black Engineers

A History of Innovation: Pioneering Achievements of Black Engineers | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
12 Pioneering Engineers you should celebrate this Black History Month.
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Study: One Third of STEM Students in US Change Majors

Study: One Third of STEM Students in US Change Majors | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
About one third of college students in the U.S. change majors at least once. And many who do so began in science, technology, engineering and math – in other words, STEM fields.

In December, the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics released a study on students who changed majors. The study looked at 25,000 college students who entered into degree programs for the first time in 2011.

By 2014, about one in three first-time students seeking bachelor’s degrees changed majors. One in ten changed majors more than once.

In addition, the study found that students in STEM fields are about 6 percent more likely to change majors than non-STEM students.

Tracy Hunt-White is one of the researchers who worked on the study. She points out that an earlier study found about one third of STEM students who changed majors left the STEM fields completely. They chose non-STEM related majors instead. The most recent study found that students who start in mathematics are the most likely to change, with 52 percent choosing another field.
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You’d have to be a genius: the problem with 'brilliance' and STEM participation | NSF - National Science Foundation

You’d have to be a genius: the problem with 'brilliance' and STEM participation | NSF - National Science Foundation | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
January 9, 2018

Why do large gender disparities exist in certain fields but not others? Research suggests that many factors perpetuate gender disparities, including implicit and explicit biases, a lack of role models and quality mentoring -- and broad stereotypes about gender roles.

NSF-funded researchers are investigating how beliefs about what it takes to succeed in scientific fields may drive career trajectories. These "field-specific beliefs" could play an important role in making women feel welcomed or excluded.

"If we want a world where talented women aren't needlessly discouraged from pursuing many prestigious and rewarding careers, we need to think more carefully about the career messages we send to women and girls," said Andrei Cimpian, professor of psychology at New York University.

Disparities across fields

From physics and math to philosophy, a perception persists in certain fields that success requires being a "born genius." This perception is less common in other fields, like biology and medicine, where hard work and perseverance are viewed as the key to success. The emphasis on genius in certain fields likely poses an obstacle to the career advancement of women. This is because, in society, a gender stereotype associates "brilliance" and "genius" with men.
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Science News for Students | News and feature articles from all fields of science

Science News for Students | News and feature articles from all fields of science | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Science News for Students is an award-winning, online publication dedicated to providing age-appropriate, topical science news to learners, parents and educators. It's a program of Society for Science & the Public.
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Syllabus | Classical Mechanics | Physics | MIT OpenCourseWare

Syllabus | Classical Mechanics | Physics | MIT OpenCourseWare | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
This first course in the physics curriculum introduces classical mechanics. Historically, a set of core concepts — space, time, mass, force, momentum, torque, and angular momentum — were introduced in classical  mechanics in order to solve the most famous physics problem, the motion of the planets.

The principles of mechanics successfully described many other phenomena encountered in the world. Conservation laws involving energy, momentum and angular momentum provided a second parallel approach to solving many of the same problems. In this course, we will investigate both approaches: Force and conservation laws.

Our goal is to develop a conceptual understanding of the core concepts, a familiarity with the experimental verification of our theoretical laws, and an ability to apply the theoretical framework to describe and predict the motions of bodies.

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Trends in electric-vehicle design | McKinsey & Company

Trends in electric-vehicle design | McKinsey & Company | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
What did we learn from a teardown and benchmarking of ten EV models?

Regulatory pressures on internal combustion engines (ICEs), combined with technological improvements in electric powertrains and batteries, are driving a surge of demand for electric vehicles (EVs). Most incumbent car manufacturers are rolling out models, joined by new entrants without ICE legacies. Worldwide sales of pure battery EVs (excluding hybrids) grew by approximately 45 percent in 2016.

With EVs becoming mass-market products, it is time for a detailed understanding of technology trends. In collaboration with A2Mac1, a provider of automotive benchmarking services, we conducted a large-scale benchmarking of first- and second-generation EV models, which included physically disassembling ten EV models: the 2011 Nissan LEAF, the 2013 Volkswagen e-up!, the 2013 Tesla Model S 60, the 2014 Chevrolet Spark, the 2014 BMW i3, the 2015 Volkswagen e-Golf, the 2015 BYD e6, the 2017 Nissan LEAF, the 2017 Chevrolet Bolt, and the 2017 Opel Ampera-e.
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TryEngineering Together

TryEngineering Together | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
TryEngineering Together™ is a response to the urgent need to inspire and educate our future generation of engineers. Created by Cricket Media and IEEE, TryEngineering Together partners with corporations to match company employee volunteers with students in 3rd to 5th grade, particularly those in economically disadvantaged communities, in 1:1 “eMentoring” relationships to create safe, powerful STEM learning experiences.

By exploring the wonders of flight, learning about how wind energy helps to preserve our planet, or how inventions are shaping our future, kids learn to think critically, solve problems, work collaboratively and creatively. Students become confident in their ability to learn and enjoy STEM subjects and begin to understand and appreciate the wonder and variety of STEM career possibilities.
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Periodical | Rethinking Common Practices in High School Chemistry | AACT

This is the first in a series of posts about rethinking common practices in high school chemistry.

Part I: Physical vs. Chemical Changes

The distinction between a physical change and a chemical change usually takes a prominent role at the beginning of a physical science or chemistry course. For many instructors, this seems intuitive: in a course dedicated to the study of matter and change, we should distinguish between types of change early to provide a foundation on which to construct our future studies. A brief survey of five common high school and college chemistry texts shows that all address the distinction in the early chapters, and a search of the resources on the website of the American Association of Chemistry Teachers reveals about 30 resources dedicated to the practice.

The problem with categorizing changes at the beginning of a course in chemistry is that the rationale used necessarily rests on macroscopic observation alone — students do not yet have knowledge of the particulate level of matter to justify in terms of atom rearrangement. These macroscopic observations are not sufficient for categorizing each change because they are rife with ambiguity. That ambiguity, when encountered, does not contribute to student understanding of chemistry and is often at odds with students’ premature notions of the arrangement of matter.

Rather, classroom time should be spent developing a more robust understanding of the particulate nature of matter and exploring the details of different types of changes over the course of the year. Only once the particulate nature of matter is thoroughly understood should we seek to define physical and chemical changes in terms of particle rearrangement. All of the different changes normally discussed at the beginning of the year can be dispersed and addressed in turn throughout the curriculum.
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MakerBot Intros Platform for Experimental Projects -- Campus Technology

MakerBot Intros Platform for Experimental Projects -- Campus Technology | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
A new offering from MakerBot aims to serve as an experimental platform for creating, building, innovating and collaborating with 3D printing. MakerBot Labs is a sandbox for designers and engineers that includes customizable hardware and software with open APIs, custom print nodes and more.

"We're introducing this new, more open platform as a direct response to our advanced users calling for greater freedom with materials and software," explained MakerBot CEO Nadav Goshen in a statement.

The first products available on the platform include:

MakerBot Labs Experimental Extruder, a customizable extruder with four interchangeable nozzles, such as a large-diameter draft nozzle (for "draft" printing at higher speeds) and a stainless steel nozzle (for printing in abrasive materials);
Custom print modes in MakerBot Print, allowing users to import and export print setting configurations for various materials and objectives;
MakerBot Labs Community on Thingiverse, a hub for users to collaborate, discuss techniques and share resources like custom material print modes, custom hardware mods, new apps and software APIs; and
MakerBot Labs API, giving developers the means to interface with and expand the capabilities of MakerBot 3D printers.
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About Us New | Million Women Mentors

About Us New | Million Women Mentors | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it

 To support the engagement of two million Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) mentors (male and female) to increase the interest and confidence of girls and young women to persist and succeed in STEM programs and careers by 2020. Million Women Mentors® is the movement that aims to change the face of women and girls, their career choices and advancement. We have 39 states with pledges and committees; 60 corporations and 60 partners are engaged nationally; and the global pledges are increasing. These important partnerships represent more than 30 million girls and women and the media partners as well. It is about scaling up and insuring that women and girls are encouraging and supported in their STEM careers.

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MakePad is the First DIY Tablet Based on Raspberry Pi - Press Release - Digital Journal

SAN FRANCISCO - September 20, 2017 - (Newswire.com)
​​​​Albeit very few students have had computer science lessons on an on-the-spot basis, the majority lacks access to both technical information and equipment, though. In spite of these restrictions, even those not-so-fortunate kids still find themselves emerged in a plethora of social networks, instant messaging and online-gaming. Paradox? Worse: Instead of learning how to think, children have been more inclined to mimic unfiltered and common-sense-web-based knowledge on daily basis. Even if you turn off your internet router, they will find a way around it.

Feeling uneased already? We are and we have been for a long time. That is the main reason why MakePi was born envisioning to cope with STEM’s teaching and learning processes. Let us walk you through all the features of our MakePad and share how we have designed, developed and implemented them to fulfill our founders’ vision.

1) 10.1” TOUCHSCREEN DISPLAY

MakePi developed a solution for a 10.1” touchscreen display that could be controlled and, thus, keeping all of RaspberryPi’s four USB ports free to be used with a lot of other peripherals. This solution will allow students to explore endless possibilities with their fingertips.

2) OPERATIONAL SYSTEM CUSTOMIZED FOR STEM EDUCATION

Based on Linux distribution Debian 9, MakePad’s OS (MakeOS) feels fun and fast. Customized toward a user-friendly perception, we have optimized its operations for touchscreen appliances. Nonetheless, it offers support for many peripherals since we have kept all USB and GPIO ports free to be used.

3) CHILDREN CAN ASSEMBLE THE TABLET WITH THEIR OWN HANDS

All the components can be easily assembled to the inner section of the tablet because of its tethering patterns. Except for the RaspberryPi’s, all the other circuits had to be customized for both functionality and user-friendly design. Children will understand how the hardware works altogether by connecting the cables and comprehending the logical sequence to power up the MakePad.

4) MOBILITY WITH A LITHIUM BATTERY OF 12-HOUR-AUTONOMY

Besides being equipped with a powerful battery, MakePad’s DIY concept allows children to easily replace it with additional units.

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DiscoverE

DiscoverE | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
We help unite, mobilize, and support the engineering and technology volunteer communities. We provide engineering activities for kids and students.
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Watch Full Episodes Online of The Crowd & the Cloud on PBS

Watch Full Episodes Online of The Crowd & the Cloud on PBS | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
THE CROWD & THE CLOUD is a documentary series showcasing the power of Citizen Science in the Digital Age. This multi-part series, hosted by former NASA Chief Scientist Waleed Abdalati, takes viewers on a global tour of the projects and people on the front lines of citizen science and crowdsourcing. By observing their environment, monitoring neighborhoods, and collecting information about the world

Distributed nationally by American Public Television
The Crowd & The Cloud is made possible by NSF, The National Science Foundation, "Where Discoveries Begin."
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Center on Education and the Workforce: State Initiatives

Center on Education and the Workforce: State Initiatives | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Welcome to the State Initiative
This initiative helps states utilize data more effectively to inform policy and planning and support decisions about education and careers. Higher education faces growing pressure to demonstrate the labor market value of postsecondary programs and credentials. To support these efforts, we are working with states and higher education systems to set educational attainment goals, increase transparency about labor market outcomes, and improve alignment between education and the economy.

Our researchers analyze state-based administrative data; national datasets, such as the American Community Survey; and new sources of labor market data, such as Internet job postings collected by private research firms. To learn more about our current and past work with states, please explore the interactive map and featured items on this page.
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Jupiter - Galleries | Planets - NASA Solar System Exploration

Jupiter - Galleries | Planets - NASA Solar System Exploration | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Jupiter: Galleries
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Why Is the U.S. So Bad at Worker Retraining?

Why Is the U.S. So Bad at Worker Retraining? | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
The strategies used to help workers displaced by technology and globalization in the 1980s ultimately failed. So why do the country’s policymakers continue to resort to the same tactics?
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MIT Researchers Speed Up 3D Printing 10 Times -- Campus Technology

MIT Researchers Speed Up 3D Printing 10 Times -- Campus Technology | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed a desktop 3D printer that they say is up to 10 times faster than those currently commercially available.

Anastasios John Hart, associate professor of mechanical engineering and director of MIT's Laboratory for Manufacturing and Productivity and the Mechanosynthesis Group, partnered with Jamison Go, a former graduate researcher in Hart's lab, identified in a previous paper three issues that slow down printer performance.
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Shaping Tomorrow : Hydrogen: The next wave for electric vehicles?

Shaping Tomorrow : Hydrogen: The next wave for electric vehicles? | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Shaping Tomorrow is a research and analysis service that helps you better 'anticipate the future', recognise the opportunities and trends that will affect you and your organisation and plan accordingly.
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Climate Science Special Report: Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4), Volume I

Climate Science Special Report Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4), Volume I 

This report is an authoritative assessment of the science of climate change, with a focus on the United States. It represents the first of two volumes of the Fourth National Climate Assessment, mandated by the Global Change Research Act of 1990.

About this Report 

As a key part of the Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4), the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) oversaw the production of this stand-alone report of the state of science relating to climate change and its physical impacts. The Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) is designed to be an authoritative assessment of the science of climate change, with a focus on the United States, to serve as the foundation for efforts to assess climate-related risks and inform decision-making about responses. In accordance with this purpose, it does not include an assessment of literature on climate change mitigation, adaptation, economic valuation, or societal responses, nor does it include policy recommendations. As Volume I of NCA4, CSSR serves several purposes, including providing 1) an updated detailed analysis of the findings of how climate change is affecting weather and climate across the United States; 2) an executive summary and other CSSR materials that provide the basis for the discussion of climate science found in the second volume of the NCA4; and 3) foundational information and projections for climate change, including extremes, to improve “end-to-end” consistency in sectoral, regional, and resilience analyses within the second volume. CSSR integrates and evaluates the findings on climate science and discusses the uncertainties associated with these findings. It analyzes current trends in climate change, both human-induced and natural, and projects major trends to the end of this century. As an assessment and analysis of the science, this report provides important input to the development of other parts of NCA4, and their primary focus on the human welfare, societal, economic, and environmental elements of climate change. Much of this report is written at a level more appropriate for a scientific audience, though the Executive Summary is intended to be accessible to a broader audience. Report Development, Review, and Approval Process The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) serves as the administrative lead agency for the preparation of NCA4. The CSSR Federal Science Steering Committee (SSC)1 has representatives from three agencies (NOAA, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA], and the Department of Energy [DOE]); USGCRP;2 and three Coordinating Lead Authors, all of whom were Federal employees during the development of this report. Following a public notice for author nominations in March 2016, the SSC selected the writing team, consisting of scientists representing Federal agencies, national laboratories, universities, and the private sector. Contributing Authors were requested to provide special input to the Lead Authors to help with specific issues of the assessment. The first Lead Author Meeting was held in Washington, DC, in April 2016, to refine the outline contained in the SSC-endorsed prospectus and to make writing assignments. Over the course of 18 months before final publication, seven CSSR drafts were generated, with each successive iteration—from zero- to sixth-order drafts—undergoing additional expert review, as follows: (i) by the writing team itself (13–20 June 2016); (ii) by the SSC convened to oversee report development (29 July–18 August 2016); (iii) by the technical agency representatives (and designees) comprising the Subcommittee on Global Change Research (SGCR, 3–14 October 2016); (iv) by the SSC and technical liaisons again (5–13 December 2016); (v) by the general public during the Public Comment Period (15 December 2016–3 February 2017) and an expert panel convened by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NAS, 21 December 2016–13 March 2017);3 and (vi) by the SGCR again (3–24 May 2017) to confirm the Review Editor conclusions that all public and NAS comments were adequately addressed. In October 2016, an 11-member core writing team was tasked with capturing the most important CSSR key findings and generating an Executive Summary. Two additional Lead Authors Meetings were held after major review milestones to facilitate chapter team deliberations and consistency: 2–4 November 2016 (Boulder, CO) and 21–22 April 2017 (Asheville, NC). Literature cutoff dates were enforced, with all cited material published by June 2017. The fifth-order draft including the Executive Summary was compiled in June 2017, and submitted to the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). OSTP is responsible for the Federal clearance process prior to final report production and public release. This published report represents the final (sixth-order) draft. The Sustained National Climate Assessment The Climate Science Special Report has been developed as part of the USGCRP’s sustained National Climate Assessment (NCA) process. This process facilitates continuous and transparent participation of scientists and stakeholders across regions and sectors, enabling new information and insights to be assessed as they emerge. The Climate Science Special Report is aimed at a comprehensive assessment of the science underlying the changes occurring in Earth’s climate system, with a special focus on the United States. Sources Used in this Report The findings in this report are based on a large body of scientific, peer-reviewed research, as well as a number of other publicly available sources, including well-established and carefully evaluated observational and modeling datasets. The team of authors carefully reviewed these sources to ensure a reliable assessment of the state of scientific understanding. Each source of information was determined to meet the four parts of the quality assurance guidance provided to authors (following the approach from NCA3): 1) utility, 2) transparency and traceability, 3) objectivity, and 4) integrity and security. Report authors assessed and synthesized information from peer-reviewed journal articles, technical re­ports produced by Federal agencies, scientific assessments (such as the rigorously-reviewed international assessments from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change,1 reports of the National Academy of Sciences and its associated National Research Council, and various regional climate impact assessments, conference proceedings, and government statistics (such as population census and energy usage).
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New Resources from the AACT AP Chemistry Content Writing Team | AACT

This past summer AACT hosted an AP Chemistry Content Writing Team to create AP chemistry focused teaching resources for our High School Classroom Resource Library. The three teachers chosen focused on creating teaching resources directly related to the Learning Objectives identified in Big Ideas 4, 5, and 6. This week we are publishing the first of two resources from each of our content team members.
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Online Professional Development from EiE | Engineering is Elementary

Online Professional Development from EiE
Interactive and on-demand learning experiences for engineering educators like you!
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Teacher Advisor With Watson

Teacher Advisor With Watson | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Get the resources you need in seconds

With Watson's teacher-specific search and recommendation tool, you can now find relevant lessons, activities, standards information, and strategies faster than ever—all from a corpus of proven-effective materials recommended by educators.

Free, easy-to-use lesson planning tool
Currently supports K-5 math instruction
Only includes credible, vetted content
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Circuit Scramble - Android Apps on Google Play

Circuit Scramble
Contains ads · Offers in-app purchases

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The fascinating physics of everyday life

The fascinating physics of everyday life | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
Physics doesn't just happen in a fancy lab -- it happens when you push a piece of buttered toast off the table or drop a couple of raisins in a fizzy drink or watch a coffee spill dry. Become a more interesting dinner guest as physicist Helen Czerski presents various concepts in physics you can become familiar with using everyday things found in your kitchen.
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Alaska’s Permafrost Is Thawing

Alaska’s Permafrost Is Thawing | STEM Education models and innovations with Gaming | Scoop.it
ALASKA’S PERMAFROST
IS THAWING
The loss of frozen ground in Arctic regions is a striking result of
climate change. And it is also a cause of more warming to come.

BY HENRY FOUNTAIN
AUG. 23, 2017
YUKON DELTA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, Alaska — The Arctic is warming about twice as fast as other parts of the planet, and even here in sub-Arctic Alaska the rate of warming is high. Sea ice and wildlife habitat are disappearing; higher sea levels threaten coastal native villages.

But to the scientists from Woods Hole Research Center who have come here to study the effects of climate change, the most urgent is the fate of permafrost, the always-frozen ground that underlies much of the state.

Starting just a few feet below the surface and extending tens or even hundreds of feet down, it contains vast amounts of carbon in organic matter — plants that took carbon dioxide from the atmosphere centuries ago, died and froze before they could decompose. Worldwide, permafrost is thought to contain about twice as much carbon as is currently in the atmosphere.

Once this ancient organic material thaws, microbes convert some of it to carbon dioxide and methane, which can flow into the atmosphere and cause even more warming. Scientists have estimated that the process of permafrost thawing could contribute as much as 1.7 degrees Fahrenheit to global warming over the next several centuries, independent of what society does to reduce emissions from burning fossil fuels and other activities.
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