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Science, technology, engineering and math in K-12
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Ignite Change

Ignite Change | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
  Ignite Change is the Center for Biological Diversity’s national network for grassroots action that's standing up to save life on Earth. We are organizing across the country to protect the environment and be a powerful, sustained voice for wildlife, wild places and a livable planet. We're building a massive, volunteer-driven network to challenge Congress, organize and attend rallies, and create local and regional campaigns to save our public lands and oceans. This is a grassroots network that depends on people like you and we need your help to build a powerful network of resistance that's speaking up for the wild every day. Join today here or by filling out the form below. The Earth needs you — join today and help us Ignite Change.
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Nanooze_15_environment_pages-19214xu.pdf

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's insight:
What is a “Nanooze” (we say it….nah–news)? Nanooze is not a thing, Nanooze is a place. A place to hear about the latest exciting stuff in science and technology, particularly things related to Nanotechnology, the science of really small things !. This issue is about the Environment. Enjoy!
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A Remote Paradise Island Is Now a Plastic Junkyard

A Remote Paradise Island Is Now a Plastic Junkyard | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Henderson Island is isolated and uninhabited—but its beaches are still covered in garbage.  

 

Henderson Island (article or podcast) is about the most remote place you can visit without leaving the planet. It sits squarely in the middle of the South Pacific, 3,500 miles from New Zealand in one direction and another 3,500 miles from South America in the other.  Henderson should be pristine. It is uninhabited. Tourists don’t go there. There’s no one around to drop any litter. The whole place was declared a World Heritage Site by the United Nations in 1988. The nearest settlement is 71 miles away, and has just 40 people on it. And yet, seafaring plastic has turned it into yet another of humanity’s scrapheaps.

 

Tags: pollution, Oceania, water, environment, sustainability, consumption.


Via Seth Dixon
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ERougeux courses's curator insight, August 2, 2017 9:13 AM
This is terrible! If only we could create a material that replaces plastic and is eco-friendly!
Tiffany Cooper's curator insight, August 22, 2017 3:17 PM

#GEO130

M Sullivan's curator insight, November 29, 2017 11:23 PM
Useful for the IDU topic of plastic single use water bottles.
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America's Best Long Trails

America's Best Long Trails | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Plan your next big hike with this map of America's most-loved long trails.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 27, 2017 1:47 PM

My uncle hiked the entire Pacific Crest Trail and as a kid the enormity of that feat was both inspirational and mind-boggling.  Recently I watched an incredible documentary about an ultra-marathoner's quest on Vermont's Long Trail (Finding Traction: free on Amazon Prime--trailer here).  While I doubt most of us could go the full length of these trails given our jobs, fitness levels, etc., I do think that getting outside to explore some of the physical environments in our local areas this summer sounds like a fantastic idea (high-res map here).  

 

Tags: transportation, landscape, place, sportphysical, environment, mappingmap.

Bridget Barker's curator insight, June 1, 2017 1:27 PM
Not related to fungal pathogens, but work life balance is important!
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Israel Proves the Desalination Era Is Here

Israel Proves the Desalination Era Is Here | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
One of the driest countries on Earth now makes more freshwater than it needs

 

Driven by necessity, Israel is learning to squeeze more out of a drop of water than any country on Earth; researchers have pioneered new techniques in drip irrigation, water treatment and desalination. “The Middle East is drying up,” says Osnat Gillor, a professor at the Zuckerberg Institute who studies the use of recycled wastewater on crops. “The only country that isn’t suffering acute water stress is Israel.” That water stress has been a major factor in the turmoil tearing apart the Middle East, but Bar-Zeev believes that Israel’s solutions can help its parched neighbors, too — and in the process, bring together old enemies in common cause.

 

Tags: drought, water, environment, Israel, technology, Middle East.


Via Seth Dixon, Jim Lerman
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Susan Grice's curator insight, February 4, 2017 8:51 AM
GReat!
1
Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 5, 2017 5:03 PM
Geographic Concepts: Spatial Significance, Geographic Perspective
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The Sargasso Sea

"The Sargasso Sea occupies almost two thirds of the North Atlantic Ocean. Within this sea, circling ocean currents accumulate mats of Sargassum seaweed that shelter a surprising variety of fishes, snails, crabs, and other small animals. The animal community today is much less diverse than it was in the early 1970s, when the last detailed studies were completed in this region. This study shows that animal communities in the Sargasso Sea are definitely changing. The next step is to find out why."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 2017 9:58 AM

Often, we define oceans and seas based on their borders with land as their defining characteristics (this is one reason why many don't know about the Southern Ocean as a distinct body of water or consider it an ocean). The Sargasso Sea is defined by ocean currents; it is surrounded by great currents but is itself without a strong current, making it perilous for early seafarers.  These oceanic doldrums became shrouded in superstition as stories of the fabled Bermuda Triangle spread, but the truth is all in the ocean currents.   

 

Tags: water, biogeography, environment, physical.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, January 22, 2017 7:38 PM
Geography Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends, Interrelationships
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Skokomish River salmon cross the road

"Watch salmon race across the road on their way to spawn; for more footage, watch this extended version."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 16, 2016 9:57 AM

We often see examples of how human modifications to ecosystems or watersheds have devastatingly negative impacts.  This is a remarkable example from Washington's Olympic Peninsula that shows the resiliency of natural systems to overcome human modifications to the physical landscape.  If you study the world, you will always have something to both amaze and surprise you.   

 

Tagsfluvial, biogeography, environment, geomorphology, physicalwater, environment adapt, environment modify.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 17, 2016 11:45 PM

Sometimes the natural world finds ways to adapt to human environmental changes. 

Useful when studying inland water / rivers for the option study. 

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The Whale's Tail

The Whale's Tail | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"The Ballena Marine National Park is located in Puntarenas, at the South Pacific coast of Costa Rica." 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 6, 2016 3:33 PM

This National Park in Costa Rica is a delightful example of many things geographic.  Not only is the local biogeography make this a place famous for whales (ballena in Spanish), but the physical geography also resembles a whale's tail.  This feature is called a tombolo, where a spit connects an island or rock cluster to the mainland. Additionally, there is also a great community of citizen cartographers mapping out this park and the surrounding communities. 

 

Tagsbiogeography, environment, geomorphology, physicalwater, landforms.

Alexander peters's curator insight, October 24, 2016 12:23 PM
This article was about the whale and how they were repopulating and how the whale hunting was banned in the 70s. I think this article was really good because use it talked about whales.
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Earth Temperature Timeline

Earth Temperature Timeline | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 13, 2016 2:03 PM

This infographic is a fascinating way to put into context the very recent trend of rising global temperatures.  This is worth scrolling all the way through to make the ending all the more meaningful.  Oh yeah, and August 2016 was the hottest month in recorded history...only 11 months of record-breaking temperatures.  

 

TagsXKCD, artinfographic, physicalhistorical, environment, climate change.

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Dakota Access Pipeline: What You Need to Know

Dakota Access Pipeline: What You Need to Know | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Conflict between Native American protesters and private security personnel over construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline has turned violent. What is the Dakota Access Pipeline?

 

Tags: industry, conflict, economic, energy, resources, environment, indigenous, ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
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The Depths of the Unseen Ocean

The Depths of the Unseen Ocean | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"The depths below the ocean’s surface comprise a staggering 95 percent of the Earth’s living space, and much of it is unexplored by humans. To put into perspective just how deep the oceans go, this XKCD comic, (hi-res image).  Most of the ocean doesn’t even see sunlight. Even scientists aren’t familiar with everything that’s down there."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 30, 2016 1:50 PM

XKCD is a comic strip that deals with many intellectual issues, but it can also be a wealth of quality scientific information.  This infographic on the oceans is staggering.

 

Tags: XKCD, artinfographic, physical, environmentwater.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, September 1, 2016 3:24 AM
The Depths of the Unseen Ocean
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Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument

"President Barack Obama designated tens of thousands of acres of Maine forest as a national monument on Wednesday, one day before the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service.  The area, known as the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument, spans 87,500 acres of the state’s stunning northern woods. The area is named for Mount Katahdin, which is Maine’s highest mountain and is located within the adjacent Baxter State Park."

 

Tags: conservation, physical, biogeography, environment.


Via Seth Dixon
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Louisiana in Tough Shape

Louisiana in Tough Shape | STEM Connections | Scoop.it
Unlike the many maps we have seen that show what Florida, Boston, or some other coastal location would look like with higher sea levels, the figure above compares the iconic outline of Louisiana with the present-day outline of its dry land. An important caveat is that some of the removed areas are wetlands, meaning they are not under water all the time, but those lands are not available for most human uses (aside from fishing), so this outline warrants attention.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 22, 2016 12:31 PM

Last month I was in New Orleans, Louisiana and I'm so disheartened to know that thousands have their homes under water.  As stated in this article, "the boot is at best an inaccurate approximation of Louisiana’s true shape and, at worst, an irresponsible lie."  To explore the issue yourself, this gorgeous interactive map pulls together some high quality source materials on a wide range of issues to look at this environmental issues of this region in a holistic manner.

 

Tags: environmentweather and climatecoastal, water, disasters

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The Fukushima Nuclear Meltdown Continues Unabated | Global Research - Centre for Research on Globalization

The Fukushima Nuclear Meltdown Continues Unabated | Global Research - Centre for Research on Globalization | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

Via ThePlanetaryArchives/San Francisco CA
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"The Last of the Free Seas"

"The Last of the Free Seas" | STEM Connections | Scoop.it

"The Last of the Free Seas is the title of this fantastic map of the Great Lakes made by Boris Artzbasheff.  It was published in Fortune Magazine in July 1940."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 14, 2017 5:23 PM

The inland waterways were absolutely critical to the demographic and economic development of the eastern part of the United States, especially from 1820-1940.  Before World War II, Great Lakes shipping exceeded the tonnage of U.S. Pacific Coast shipping (see hi-res map here). World War II and the beginning of the Cold War led to a consolidation of naval power for the United States and its allies, greatly expanding Pacific shipping trade and spurring fast-developing economies countries. 

 

Great Lakes shipping dramatically declined, in part because steel production has gone to lower-cost producers that were connected to the U.S. economy through the expanded trade.  Some could see irony since the steel warships created from the Great Lakes manufacturing enabled expanded Pacific and Atlantic trade that led to the decline of Great Lakes manufacturing and regional struggles in the rust belt.  Still, more than 200 million tons of cargo, mostly iron ore, coal, and grain, travel across the Great Lakes annually.

 

This deindustrialization clearly is a huge economic negative but the environmental impacts for lakeside communities has been enormous.  Industrial emissions in the watershed and shipping pollution in the lakes went down as waterfowl populations returned and more waterfront property became swimmable again.  Still this map of the environmental stress on the Great Lakes shows they are far from pristine.    

 

Tagsenvironment, historicalwater, resources, transportation, industry, economicregions, globalization.

 

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, August 8, 2017 9:08 PM
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