MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in the news
216 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

Scientists hail find as ‘major milestone’ in tackling blood cancer

Scientists hail find as ‘major milestone’ in tackling blood cancer | MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in the news | Scoop.it
Molecules that could halt the growth of an aggressive type of blood cancer have been identified by Scots researchers, who hailed the find as a “major milestone” in treating the disease.
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

Cancer‬ study identifies genes that stop onset of ‪‎leukaemia‬.

 

Prof Kamil Kranc: Our discovery that Hif-1alpha and Hif-2alpha molecules act together to stop leukaemia development is a major milestone in our efforts to combat leukaemia. 

 

Press release 7 Dec 2015: http://bit.ly/1LYNJQK

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

Why study stem cells? #AStemCellScientistBecause

Why study stem cells? #AStemCellScientistBecause | MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in the news | Scoop.it
() Did you follow the social media chat about #astemcellscientistbecause in the lead up to Stem Cell Awareness Day 2015 (14 October)?It was fascinating to hear the many and varied reasons people have chosen to work in this field and study stem cells.If you missed the tweets and posts, here they are collected together in a Storify. [&am
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

PhD students at CRM explained why they study stem cells as part of a campaign for Stem Cell Awareness Day 2015 (14 October) using the hashtag ‪#‎astemcellscientistbecause‬. Check more tweets on https://twitter.com/DrSkelfie ;

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

Eight tiny organs grown by scientists - insight

Eight tiny organs grown by scientists - insight | MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in the news | Scoop.it
Today researchers at the MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine announced that they have regrown damaged livers in mice. It’s just one example of scientists growing tiny versions of organs in …
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

Nice blog with overview of regenerative medicine progress over the last year in terms of organ growth - includes two stories of CRM based research: liver (Prof Stuart Forbes) and thymus (Prof Clare Blackburn).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

Multiple sclerosis researchers to receive £2m funding boost

Multiple sclerosis researchers to receive £2m funding boost | MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in the news | Scoop.it
The Edinburgh Centre is focusing on stem cell research for the next five years.
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

The awarded MS Society funding will be used to further understand how multiple sclerosis develops with the ultimate aim to develop novel treatments. Filmed at the Scottish Centre for Regenerative Medicine building, Prof Siddharthan Chandran, Co-Director of the Edinburgh Centre for MS Research, said he is hopeful for the future.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

Battling cholangiocarcinoma with WNT inhibition - YouTube

Cholangiocarcinoma is a cancer of the bile duct that has a poor prognosis, largely due to it being refractory to available therapies. In this episode, Stuart...
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

 

A new bile duct cancer study led by Prof Stuart Forbes may pave way for new treatments. 

 

The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation on 17 February 2015, suggests experimental drugs targeting the wnt pathway might help patients with cholangiocarcinoma.

Press release: http://ow.ly/JffeA

Various press coverage including STV News online (http://bit.ly/1MUsNhQ) and Herald Scotland (http://bit.ly/1DdK51v). 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

Innovation (Re)Generation: Exploring Regenerative Medicine - YouTube

Over recent years, considerable interest has been developing in regard to therapies that have become and may become available based on what is known as ‘rege...
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

 

The University of Edinburgh's Mason Institute (http://masoninstitute.org/) developed this nice video, which explores the field of regenerative medicine. In the video CRM researcher Dr Tilo Kunath (http://bit.ly/1B8OLdy) discusses how his group uses stem cells to ultimately help find treatments for Parkinson's disease.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

Research uncovers hope for blood cancer patients

EFFORTS to create personalised treatments for patients with blood cancers such as leukaemia have been boosted by new findings from researchers in Scotland.
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

 

One of the clinically important goals in science is generating  haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for clinical transplantations. Although pluripotent stem cells can give rise to all cell types of the body and hold great hopes for regenerative medicine, the generation of HSCs from these cells remains a big challenge.

 

A new scientific study, led by CRM Prof Alexander Medvinsky describes some early important steps in HSC development which can help develop future protocols for making HSCs in the laboratory.

 

The findings were published in the open access journal 'Stem Cell Reports', http://bit.ly/1ym1mc4.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

Scientists hail creation of working organ made from laboratory cells

Scientists hail creation of working organ made from laboratory cells | MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in the news | Scoop.it
British scientists produce working thymus, a vital immune system 'nerve centre' located near the heart
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

 

CRM Prof Clare Blackburn, who led the team, said:

 

“The ability to grow replacement organs from cells in the lab is one of the ‘holy grails’ in regenerative medicine. But the size and complexity of lab-grown organs has so far been limited. By directly reprogramming cells we’ve managed to produce an artificial cell type that, when transplanted, can form a fully organised and functional organ. This is an important first step towards the goal of generating a clinically useful artificial thymus in the lab.”

 

The study, published in Nature Cell Biology on 24th August 2014, was covered widely in the media (TV, print, online). Some additional stories here:

- BBC (UK): http://bbc.in/1wpl9Gt 

- Huffington Post (US): http://huff.to/1mLWa6X

- YouTube video: http://youtu.be/wcc0eVoubEk

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh from The future of medicine and health
Scoop.it!

Scientists regenerate organ in mice in world-first breakthrough

Scientists regenerate organ in mice in world-first breakthrough | MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in the news | Scoop.it
Results on regenerated thymus in very old mice potentially open way for helping humans live longer

-

Scientists have regenerated a living organ for the first time, potentially opening the way for life-lengthening human therapies.

 

A team at Edinburgh University’s MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine managed to rebuild the thymus of very old mice, re-establishing the health of the organ seen in younger creatures.

 

Scientists reactivated a natural mechanism that shuts down with age to rejuvenate the thymus, an organ near the heart that produces important infection-fighting white blood cells, called T cells.

 

By targeting a protein called FOXN1, which helps control how genes are switched on, the function of the thymus was restored. Treated mice began to make more T cells.

 

The research, published in the journal Development, found the thymus grew to twice its previous size, and the recovery appeared sustainable. Scientists now will look into any unintended consequences of increasing FOXN1.

 

The thymus is the first organ in the human body to deteriorate as we age, contributing to the declining capacity of older people to fight off new infections, such as flu.

 

The breakthrough may lead to treatments that could significantly elongate human life. But this would be many years away, given that the process has been tested only on mice.


Via Wildcat2030
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

 

CRM Prof Clare Blackburn, who led the research, said: “By targeting a single protein, we have been able to almost completely reverse age-related shrinking of the thymus. Our results suggest that targeting the same pathway in humans may improve thymus function and therefore boost immunity in elderly patients, or those with a suppressed immune system. However, before we test this in humans we need to carry out more work to make sure the process can be tightly controlled.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

Al Jazeera Correspondent - MS & Me: Interview with Dr Anna Williams - YouTube

Dr. Anna Williams from the MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine at the University of Edinburgh discusses her latest research findings with Al Jazeera's Stephanie...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

Research looks at MS damage repair

Research looks at MS damage repair | MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in the news | Scoop.it
Treatments for multiple sclerosis that repair damage around nerve cells could be developed due to research by a team at Edinburgh University.
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

 

The research study was published in the Journal Nature Neuroscience in July 2013.

 

Dr Veronique Miron, of the MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine at the University of Edinburgh, commented:

 

“In multiple sclerosis patients, the protective layer surrounding nerve fibres is stripped away and the nerves are exposed and damaged.

 

“Approved therapies for multiple sclerosis work by reducing the initial myelin injury – they do not promote myelin regeneration. This study could help find new drug targets to enhance myelin regeneration and help to restore lost function in patients with multiple sclerosis.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

Ep. 59: “Clinical Grade” Featuring Dr. Tilo Kunath - Stem Cell Podcast

We bring on researcher Dr. Tilo Kunath to discuss his work on characterizing clinical grade stem cells so they can be used for patient therapies. 
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

Are embryonic stem cell lines safe to use in future cell therapies? Dr Tilo Kunath of the MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine investigates 34 stem cell lines and reports in this podcast.

 

Press release 26 Nov 2015: http://bit.ly/1jgcqB5

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

One Woman's Ability to Sniff Out Parkinson's Offers Hope to Sufferers

One Woman's Ability to Sniff Out Parkinson's Offers Hope to Sufferers | MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in the news | Scoop.it
A musky odor may lead to new diagnostic tools for the neurodegenerative disease
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

The research was prompted by a woman with an acute sense of smell. She approached Parkinson’s UK Senior Research Fellow Dr Tilo Kunath at one of his outreach events at CRM, organised specifically for people interested in Parkinson's research.

 

Although not directly related to Dr Tilo Kunath's main work on understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the degeneration of neurons during Parkinson’s disease, curiosity and a desire to help people affected by the disease led to a small pilot study with Prof Perdita Barran's group from Manchester University where the woman correctly identified which people from a group of 24 had Parkinson’s. She did so by smelling T-shirts that they had worn for a day.

 

Press release: http://bit.ly/1N9bNnR

Covered widely, including BBC News: http://bbc.in/1LNOfWm ;

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

Cell transplant 'regenerates' liver - BBC News

Cell transplant 'regenerates' liver - BBC News | MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in the news | Scoop.it
Transplanting cells into livers has the potential to regenerate them, say scientists.
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

Prof Stuart Forbes, lead author of the study published in Nature Stem Biology on 20 July 2015, commented:

 

"Revealing the therapeutic potential of these liver stem cells brings us a step closer to developing stem cell based treatments for patients with liver disease. It will be some time before we can turn this into reality as we will first need to test our approach using human cells. This is much needed as liver disease is a very common cause of death and disability for patients in the UK and the rest of the world.’’

 

Also covered in Metro, Herald, Daily Express, BBC Radio Scotland and others.

 

The press release can be found on the CRM website here: http://bit.ly/1HOEy4j.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

Drug that boosts nerve signals offers hope for multiple sclerosis

Drug that boosts nerve signals offers hope for multiple sclerosis | MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in the news | Scoop.it
Trialled antibody treatment thought to work by renewing the protective coating of neurons.
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

Prof Charles ffrench-Constant, Director of CRM, commented on the paper:

"The trial was small, and it is too early to know whether the drug will provide tangible relief from other symptoms of multiple sclerosis, such as numbness, cautions Charles ffrench-Constant, who studies the disease at the University of Edinburgh, UK.
 

Similar improvements in nerve conductivity could result from reduced inflammation, he adds. “You can’t assume that this is actually evidence of myelin regeneration.”
 

Nevertheless, ffrench-Constant and others are excited to see any sign that the approach may be working.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

Vivid brain pictures taken for Parkinson's competition - Telegraph

Vivid brain pictures taken for Parkinson's competition - Telegraph | MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in the news | Scoop.it

Parkinson’s UK Research Director Dr Arthur Roach said of the winners:

 

"Beautiful images like ‘Waterlillies’ [by Nicola Drummond] would be at home in the Tate, but are in fact the product of tireless researchers working to unpick what’s going awry in the hundreds of millions of nerve cells to cause people to develop Parkinson’s."

 

"As well as being visually arresting, the images give us unique insights into how we could intervene and stop Parkinson’s, or even prevent the condition in the first place."

MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

 

Runner up CRM PhD student Nicola Drummond in Dr Tilo Kunath's lab commented: "I’m really delighted for my image to be recognised in this competition. When you look at thousands of brain cells under the microscope every day you can become a bit immune to their beauty, so I’m really pleased people have seen the artistic merit in my research.”

 

Also featured in the Mail Online (http://dailym.ai/1tHmO2y) and as image of the day on The Scientist website (http://bit.ly/1oQZio9).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

'Giant leap' to type 1 diabetes cure

'Giant leap' to type 1 diabetes cure | MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in the news | Scoop.it
The search for a cure for type 1 diabetes has recently taken a "tremendous step forward", scientists say.
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

A team of scientists at Harvard University in the US published their findings in the scientific journal Cell, 9 October 2014.

 

CRM researcher Dr Gillian Morrison commented on the paper:

"We have been able to produce beta-like cells in the lab for some time, but they have been unable to function as well as their counterparts in the body. The beta cells that Melton and colleagues have generated appear to have equivalent function, this represents a real advance in the field and gives hope for their use in cell replacement therapy for type 1 diabetes. The next important challenge will be to find ways to maintain these cells inside the body so they are protected from the immune response and have long-term function."

 

Also published in BioNews: http://bit.ly/1qmSD0g.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

Breakthrough in spinal cord research could lead to eventual motor neurone disease cure

Breakthrough in spinal cord research could lead to eventual motor neurone disease cure | MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in the news | Scoop.it
Scientists have for the first time produced the "seed" cells of the human spinal cord in the lab – raising hopes that conditions such as muscular dystrophy could one day be treated by transplanting complex, lab-grown human tissue.
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

Nice research publication in collaboration with our colleagues at the MRC National Institute of Medical Research in Mill Hill.

 

More about Prof Val Wilson, co-leader of the research, on CRM's website here, http://bit.ly/1rhCv48.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

Engage reverse gear

Engage reverse gear | MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in the news | Scoop.it
REGENERATIVE medicine—the idea that it is possible to revitalise old, dilapidated tissue and keep a body going when its organs start to fail—is attractive. Much...
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

 

CRM Prof Clare Blackburn's work well described in The Economist. Lovely piece.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

Leprosy spreads by reprogramming nerve cells into migratory stem cells

Leprosy spreads by reprogramming nerve cells into migratory stem cells | MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in the news | Scoop.it

 

Mo Costandi: The surprising modus operandi of a neglected tropical disease could lead to new stem cell therapies

 

The bacterium that causes leprosy spreads through the body by converting nerve cells into stem cells with migratory properties, according to research published in the journal Cell in January 2013. The findings could improve treatments for leprosy and other infectious diseases caused by bacteria, and help clinicians to diagnose them earlier. They may also provide a safe method for developing stem cell treatments for a wide variety of other conditions.

 

Anura Rambukkana of the MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine at the University of Edinburgh and his colleagues isolated Schwann cells from adult mice, grew them in Petri dishes and infected them with M. leprae.

 

They found that the bacterium gradually turns off the genes that give Schwann cells their characteristic properties, and then activates another set of genes that transforms them into something resembling neural crest stem cells, which are only present in the embryo, and which migrate from the developing nervous along various routes to form a wide variety of tissues, including muscle, bone, cartilage, and the Schwann cells and sensory neurons of the peripheral nerves.

MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

 

Prof Anura Rambukkana and his colleagues are now investigating exactly how the leprosy bacterium hijacks the Schwann cell genome to initiate reprogramming.

 

This story was also covered in:

Best of Cell collection 2013 - http://bit.ly/1vySNbR

Cell Leading Edge, editor comment - http://bit.ly/1F2GUxP

Science news - http://bit.ly/1pg34Ct

Nature news - http://bit.ly/1sVc4Cd

Nature Reviews Microbiology - http://bit.ly/1CpllDf

Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology - http://bit.ly/1yGKzQe

BBC Health - http://bbc.in/1sWLsSk

 

See also YouTube film: http://youtu.be/8VYT_RHmjnk

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
Scoop.it!

How to teach… stem cell research

How to teach… stem cell research | MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine in the news | Scoop.it
With Japanese scientists discovering a way to make stem cells in half an hour, we've rounded up some of the top resources on the subject
MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh's insight:

 

Lots of educational resources the CRM public engagement team has contributed to - one way or another - were mentioned in this Guardian article (Feb 2014). These, and other resources, can be downloaded free of charge on http://www.eurostemcell.org/stem-cell-toolkit.

more...
No comment yet.