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CNET News - Marc Andreessen on two ways startups shouldn't spend money

http://cnet.co/1Er9wjU The famed VC says too many tech firms spend their money unwisely. CNET News Editor-in-Chief Connie Guglielmo talks with Andreessen about where Silicon Valley goes from here.”
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Startup Community The Film | A Documentary About Startups in Kitchener-Waterloo

“Startup Community is a film about what makes the Kitchener-Waterloo Region different. It was funded on Indiegogo by the community, for the community. While t...”
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Polo de tecnologia, Canadá quer trazer suas startups e levar empresas brasileiras | G1 - Tecnologia e Games - Start.up

Polo de tecnologia, Canadá quer trazer suas startups e levar empresas brasileiras | G1 - Tecnologia e Games -  Start.up | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
“[if gte mso 9]>http://t.co/rr8oE1HIYP #G1 http://t.co/…)...”
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The benefits of crowdfunding aren’t what you think

The benefits of crowdfunding aren’t what you think | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
“Local founders agree: marketing, not money, is crowdfunding's true value.” Crowdfunding’s appeal is obvious — it’s essentially free money just for having a clever idea. At least, that’s the impression the casual observer gets when they see a guy raise $55,000 to make some potato salad or $6,000 to “hire a man in a plane to write stupid things with clouds in the sky.” Even with “reward-based” crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter or Indiegogo, the crowdfunding process allows new companies to gather the capital necessary for their business without giving up equity in their business or taking on expensive debt burdens. It seems like a no-brainer: anyone with sufficient social capital can parlay it into some tangible capital. But if you speak with the entrepreneurs behind successful crowdfunding projects, most will only mention the cheap money as an afterthought. To them, crowdfunding’s real value isn’t raising funds — it’s raising awareness. According to a recent survey of Kickstarter projects by Wharton’s Ethan Mollick and the University of North Carolina’s Venkat Kuppuswamy, crowdfunding’s ostensibly ancillary benefits are actually the primary reasons why successful startups use it. “Crowdfunding is not just a means for immediate funds,” said Kuppuswamy. Rather, it’s a way to validate ideas, test markets, launch brands, find customers and impress investors. “"I was almost immediately approached by investors following success of the campaign."Cora Founder Molly Hayward”When asked why they turned to crowdfunding, 70 percent of successful campaigns said “to see if there was demand for the project,” making it the most popular response, followed by marketing and connecting with a community of supporters. Only 54 percent said “the project could not have been funded without raising the goal,” and a mere 30 percent said they turned to crowdfunding because “other traditional financing options weren’t available.” Among savvy startups — 59 percent of respondents said they were using crowdfunding to launch a new business, and another 17 percent said they were launching a new product for an existing company — the “crowd” is more important than the “funding” in crowdfunding. Is this really a good idea? So, why crowdfund? “Proof of concept and market validation,” said Lorenzo Buffa of Analog Watch Co., which raised $73,000 on Kickstarter for its Carpenter Collection, an all-natural, soft-strap wood watch. “Proof of concept” was also “the main reason” why Rooster Soup Co. turned to crowdfunding, according to Steve Cook of CookNSolo Restaurants, the guys behind Federal Donuts, Zahav and a few other esteemed eateries. Their latest is a charitable joint venture with Broad Street Ministry that will uses the profits from selling soup made from Federal Donut’s excess chicken to expand BSM’s hospitality collaborative. Despite having an enviable track record that would make even Allen Iverson levels of over-confidence understandable, Cook said they turned to Kickstarter “basically, to understand whether this was a good idea.” Forty-five days, 1,587 backers and $179,000 later, they knew they had an idea that Philadelphia would get behind. By going on Kickstarter first, companies obviate the risks of investing a ton of time and money in a product no one wants (sadly, it is too late for AC to crowdfund Revel). “I could have spent a lot of my own money,” said Buffa of Analog Watch. “But that’s such a high risk on my end. On Kickstarter, it’s such a low risk venture.” And even though Buffa “already knew there was demand and interest” for his watches, Kickstarter gave him a better idea of how much demand. “I didn’t know it’d be that popular,” he said. “The risk, of course, is that a failed crowdfunding looks worse to potential investors than a successful campaign looks good.”Crowdfunding “speaks to the desire in the market for your product,” said Molly Hayward of Cora, which raised $30,000 on Plum Alley, a crowdfunding platform specifically for women. Cora delivers a “personalized menstruation management kit” replete with tea and chocolates each month, while also delivering a similar package to a girl in India who would otherwise need to skip school during her period. Cora went on women-centric Plum Alley to create a customer base. “We were essentially pre-selling our products,” said Hayward, adding that the crowdfunding was really just a bridge to a larger, more traditional capital raise. Crowdfunding “was a way to get some validation, to increase our customer base and sort of get a little bit of money until we could open a few [angel investment] rounds and close a few rounds.” Getting ready for Round 2 Building a larger, and loyal, customer base is critical for Cora’s next project: raising $500,000 in capital this fall. “One of the great benefits of crowdfunding … is that I was almost immediately approached by investors following success of the campaign,” said Hayward. “That was a huge benefit; it opened a lot of doors. If you can galvanize 250 people around what you’re doing, and get them to open up their wallets, it says something about your product that really can’t be conveyed before you have your product. It’s a form of traction that investors usually can’t see and really want to see.” According to Kuppuswamy of UNC, many businesses use crowdfunding to make themselves more attractive to potential investors. Startups use their crowdfunding success as a way of impressing loan officers, angel investors and venture capitalists. “Assessing demand is a big deal,” he said, not just from an operational standpoint, but also as a way to pique the interest of investors. Impressing would-be investors was one of the main reasons why Pete Merzbacher of Philly Muffin took out a $5,000 loan on Kiva Zip. By demonstrating he can make those loan payments, Merzbacher says he’ll have an easier time convincing future creditors to loan him money. “It’s a way of building a track record. It’s like very public credit.” “"The marketing and exposure is fantastic."Analog Watch Co. Founder Lorenzo Buffa”Analog Watch Co. will, in time, turn to investors to ramp up international distribution and marketing, but Buffa is in no rush to give away large chunks of equity. That’s why he’s returning to Kickstarter to launch a second, “more high-end” collection this fall. “If I can say I’ve launched two successful products [on Kickstarter], do you think I’ll hold onto more equity in my company when I go to investors?” The question was rhetorical. “Hell yeah!” The risk, of course, is that a failed crowdfunding looks worse to potential investors than a successful campaign looks good. A founder can — and likely will — flub a few investor presentations without causing too much harm, but “an unsuccessful [crowdfunding] campaign is pretty damning,” said Hayward. The research bears that out: 90 percent of the successful campaigns studied by Kuppuswamy and Mollick turned into ongoing projects, compared to just 60 percent of unsuccessful campaigns. The same publicity spotlight that sets the stage for a successful company exposes an unsuccessful company’s failure for all to see. And successfully raising money is just one half of the battle. “Crowdfunding alone isn’t validation, unless you can get enough customers and then keep them,” said Cora’s Hayward. Investors want to see the demand for the product and that you can actual produce and ship it, she said. Otherwise, the successful campaign faces another risk from all its exposure, says Kuppuswamy: failing to deliver on a good idea that you’ve now published for all to see on the Internet invites imposters to take your market-tested concept and run with it. Crowdfunding and marketing If you ask a marketer, Shakespeare was wrong: A rose™ by any other name does not smell as sweet. As The Economist recently noted, brands can be the most valuable asset a company owns. And though intangible, brands are built just as surely as inventories, factories and other company assets. Brands are built on words, from stacking the bricks of consumer opinion and the mortar of corporate communications. And in the hands of the right marketing masons, crowdfunding is a powerful tool. “Performance on Kickstarter can create immense buzz around a product,” said Kuppuswamy. Moreover, that buzz “can just really feed into the success of the product,” creating a virtuous cycle of ever-increasing buzz and funding. Crowdfunding gives startups shortcuts to building at least two of the three elements of brand equity: consumer awareness and brand loyalty. And it doesn’t necessarily detract from the third: brand association (“association” here refers to the brand’s qualities rather than its associates — e.g. PBR says “cheap,” not “and a shot of Jim Beam.”) Kuppuswamy pointed to Pebble as a famous example of a company that leveraged its crowdfunding buzz into greater consumer awareness. “Pebble would have had trouble getting into E3 and SXSW without the publicity and attention they received on Kickstarter,” he said. When Buffa launched Analog Watch on Kickstarter, he “knew [he] was trying to cultivate a brand.” Like Pebble, Buffa was able to leverage its crowdfunding into the kind of advertising that money literally couldn’t pay for: an invitation to show his watches at a Museum of Modern Art show featuring crowdfunded pieces. For Buffa, who said he set out to design watches “for people who shop at MoMA,” crowdfunding gave him access to his ideal audience. The ability to build awareness among a niche audience was also why Cora’s founder chose Plum Alley for its crowdfunding. For obvious reasons, Hayward was only interested in reaching half of the population. Crowdfunding on Plum Alley provided Cora an automatic hook for the press — Cora wasn’t simply an interesting company, it was a company that needed the reader’s support. Similarly, Rooster Soup and Analog Watch both used the crowdfunding angle to pitch coverage of their campaigns — and, thus, the actual businesses behind the crowdfunding. But more than just brand awareness, crowdfunding breeds brand loyalty. When I asked Kuppuswamy whether backers of crowdfunding companies are any more likely to support a business than other customers, he responded with two anecdotes. The first was about a coffee cart in Durham that used crowdfunding to build a brick-and-mortar shop, leading the customers-cum-backers to drag friends to the café to say: “I helped make this happen.” “Successful campaigns are meticulously planned and require huge amounts of personal outreach.”The next anecdote was a bit more famous: Oculus VR, a crowd-funded virtual reality headset maker. Originally backed for nearly $2.5 million, Oculus was subsequently bought by Facebook for $2 billion, causing a huge backlash among its backers. “That sense of violation [of trust]” proved that a sense of community existed, Kuppuswamy said. That sense of community is something major brands like Apple, Coca-Cola and Harley-Davidson spend untold millions cultivating and developing over years. Crowdfunding generated that loyalty almost overnight — and for free. Well, nearly for free. Most platforms take a small percentage of the money raised and successful funders need to deliver rewards to backers. But that cost is about the same as what a good marketing company would cost, says Buffa. A good Kickstarter campaign, combined with shipping fees, might take about $9,000 out of a $100,000 campaign, “and that’s what you would have paid a marketing agency to do stuff for you.” With crowdfunding, “the marketing and exposure is fantastic,” Buffa added. Still, crowdfunding isn’t for everyone. While many of its benefits — marketing, branding, investor outreach and idea validation — seem free, and the platform fees are low, crowdfunding is extremely costly in one regard: time. Successful campaigns are meticulously planned and require huge amounts of personal outreach. And as some crowdfunding catastrophes have shown, the backlash from a failed crowdfunding can be devastating. Still, if there is any truth to McLuhan’s famous line, “the medium is the message,” crowdfunding — done right — can say more about a project than how much money it raised. Jim Saksa is a freelance writer and attorney who has written about esoteric beer laws, behavioral psychology and complex securities legislation for Slate, City Paper and PlanPhilly. He tweets bad puns at @Saksappeal and loves to receive tips at james.f.saksa@gmail.com. How to create a successful crowdfunding campaign. Watch Growthink's video: https://growthink.isrefer.com/go/newmoneysource/gt4045/ Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.ly/1aKy7km
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Entrevista com Michael Queiroz [Oratória para o Empreendedor] - YouTube

Entrevista com Michael Queiroz [Oratória para o Empreendedor] - YouTube | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
Conheça os benefícios da Oratória para o Empreendedor, com um especialista no assunto. Professor desta disciplina e com uma longa jornada de sucesso em vária...
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Neuroempreendedorismo - 3 fatores que impedem o êxito nos negócios

Neuroempreendedorismo - 3 fatores que impedem o êxito nos negócios | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
Segundo estudos de Neuroempreendedorismo existem 3 principais fatores que impedem empreendedores de obterem êxito em seus negócios. Sabe quais são eles?
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Startup desenvolve app oficial para Feira do Empreendedor em ...

Startup desenvolve app oficial para Feira do Empreendedor em ... | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
“Desenvolvido pela mobLee, startup de Florianópolis, o aplicativo esta disponível para sistemas Android e iOS. Empresários e visitantes da Feira do Empreendedor 2014, que acontece de 17 a 20 de julho, no CentroSul, em ...”
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MVP em módulos – alternativa para financiar startups? - Startupeando

MVP em módulos – alternativa para financiar startups? - Startupeando | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
“Há cerca de três anos, comecei a deslindar o segmento de startups – suas particularidades, teorias e métodos, a forma com que essas empresas se desenvolviam e o que as diferenciava das demais e, principalmente, como ...”
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Infográfico #startup de sucesso de Tim Draper em gestão de risco ...

Infográfico #startup de sucesso de Tim Draper em gestão de risco ... | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
“Infográfico #startup de sucesso de Tim Draper em gestão de risco. Fundersandfounders http://buff.ly/1xgHDXf. ← Guitar hero é pra crianças né? Veja essa com frats e strings e LED. Vídeo. gTar by Incident http://buff.ly/1pQpfjF.”
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NetConsumo: Startup ajuda compradores de imóveis a conseguir ...

NetConsumo: Startup ajuda compradores de imóveis a conseguir ... | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
“Pensando nisso, os empreendedores Julien Desvergnes, Marcos Nascimento e Rafael Sasso criaram uma startup voltada para o mercado imobiliário, a Melhortaxa. A plataforma ajuda na contratação de crédito imobiliário.”
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Startup do UPTEC cria plataforma de gestão para a indústria da ...

Startup do UPTEC cria plataforma de gestão para a indústria da ... | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
“Startup do UPTEC cria plataforma de gestão para a indústria da música ao vivo. Isabel Silva / UPTEC | 0 Comentários. A Musicverb é um assistente de luxo para artistas e agentes. Queres organizar uma festa com música ao ...”
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Babbage: The "full stack" startup - YouTube

Babbage: The "full stack" startup - YouTube | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
Are we in a tech bubble? Ben Horowitz, a Silicon Valley venture capitalist and author, tells us where the smart money should be headed. For more video conten...
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Startup cria serviço que imprime textos da web em formato de jornal

Startup cria serviço que imprime textos da web em formato de jornal | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
“NewsPaper Club permite a qualquer usuário selecionar textos que não conseguiu ler, colocar em formato de jornal e recebê-los em casa, de 3 a 5 dias depois (Startup cria serviço que imprime textos da web em formato de jornal:”
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3 Student Startups That Are Going the Distance

3 Student Startups That Are Going the Distance | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
“They've all managed to make the tricky jump from great idea to great company.”Anyone who has made it through college knows that ideas are cheap. Every conversation in the classroom, on the quad or at the coffee shop is littered with them--some great, most awful. On occasion, the spitballing even spawns a bit of short-lived business action (witness all the broken links on any Best College Startups internet list from the past few years). o Clearly, it's not just an awesome idea that makes a college startup great. It takes follow-through, patience and business smarts to transform a dorm-room musing into a viable business. Here are some college startups that made the leap from good idea to great company. The perfect fixIn 2012, Spencer Quinn was a junior at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, working a summer job at a company that sold athletic tape, when he heard about a doctor who used medical casting tape to fix an all-terrain vehicle. It was an "aha" moment for Quinn, a biotech major. Along with his cousins Reed and Chris Quinn and brother-in-law Derek Rowley, Quinn attempted to repair household items using casting tape. "I thought maybe this stuff could fix more than bones, so we started putting it on broken tools, leaky pipes and other stuff," he recalls. "It was not a good solution Those efforts didn't work, but the trio got to thinking about what elements would make a better repair tape. The product would have to go beyond duct tape to create a permanent bond, and it would need to be waterproof and able to withstand impact and heavy loads.They worked with the BYU mechanical engineering lab to find a solution. Once they had a prototype, they took it to an adhesives manufacturer to work out the production process. The result was FiberFix, which, after being soaked in water and applied tightly, can permanently repair shovel handles, leaking pipes and just about any other broken object. But creating FiberFix was just the first step. "I think so many products fail in the manufacturing and logistics stage," Quinn, now 25, explains. "You have to learn how to approach big retail buyers and know how to execute your product in such a way that you don't get chargebacks that kill the company. After that first sale, 99 percent of the work is still ahead of you." The team worked trade shows, demonstrating their miracle product to hardware and construction experts, and entered their idea in competitions. They won events at BYU and placed second in the International Business Model Competition. But their biggest coup came in October 2013, when they were featured on TV's Shark Tank, where they convinced judge Lori Greiner to invest in their concept. That led to multiple stints on QVC, where they sold 45,000 rolls of FiberFix in 10 minutes. The product is now carried at 10,000 retail locations, including Home Depot and Lowe's. More than 1.3 million rolls of FiberFix have been sold at $6 to $10 each. Despite the success, Quinn and his business partners are dedicated to finishing their education, though on a more relaxed schedule. "I was initially nervous that I wouldn't get enough support from my professors to do both things, but I haven't found a single one that wasn't excited about the opportunity and supported us," says Quinn, who hopes to expand the FiberFix product line over the next three to five years before selling the company. "BYU has lots of entrepreneurs and great talent. I think everyone here likes a good success story and wants to be a part of it in some way." Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.ly/1aKy7km Let's go to the tapeLindsay Stewart was a TV news producer in Los Angeles before enrolling at the Wharton School's San Francisco campus in 2012. The idea was to get a few letters behind her name to help make her way up the ladder on the management side of the media business. In one of her classes, students were asked to pitch a business idea. For several years, Stewart had been thinking about the inefficient ways news outlets acquire video footage. Deadline-focused assignment editors are often forced to buy tape sight-unseen from third-party stringers; at times they even contact people through YouTube. News stations go to air with whatever images they can find, good or bad. On the flip side, Stewart knew great photographers and videographers who missed out on work because they had no way to communicate directly with editors. And the payment process was equally slow and messy. When she proposed her idea of an online exchange where editors could view and purchase news footage, and photographers (and the public) could show their work and find assignments, her classmates were intrigued. But it wasn't until fellow student Brian McNeill filled her Dropbox with plans and calculations that she realized her concept, which she dubbed Stringr, could be a viable business. "It was having someone throwing their weight behind my idea that was the genesis of Stringr," Stewart says. "You can go to the best business-school program, but it's not so much about the academics as it is who sits next to you. Classmates helped write the business plan and build the tech stack. They gave me all that human capital for free, and that's what helped us launch Stringr." Through the rest of their time at Wharton, Stewart and McNeill, both of whom graduated in May, refined their concept. They're now based at the San Francisco media accelerator Matter, where they have five engineers on contract. Stringr, which launched a three-month pilot in the San Diego news market in August, plans to roll out to several more pilot cities before expanding to newsrooms around the country. Unlike other college entrepreneurs, who often have nothing to lose, Stewart, 34, and McNeill, 37, are taking big mid-career gambles with their startup. "I think doing something like this is totally different than when you're younger," Stewart says. "There are more risks--I sold my house to do this; I'm not taking a salary. But my contacts are wider and deeper; I'm able to navigate and sell to bigger companies. I'm not a 19-year-old selling a pipe dream." McNeill, who tried to start a tech company during the dot-com boom of the late 1990s, agrees that things are different this time around. "Without a network or capital to get you down those first 50 yards, starting a business is extremely difficult," he says. "At the same time, the opportunity loss is high. I walked away from a partner-track job at Ernst & Young. But leaving that behind has given me more confidence in what we're doing." The founders agree that their entrepreneurship classes helped them clarify their once-hazy expectations. "One of our professors ended our class by giving us the stats on our education and experience," Stewart says. "He said less than 1 percent of the population was as prepared as [we were] to start a business, and he ended by saying he hoped we would try. That was very inspiring. This is not just an idea for me. I feel passionate about it." Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.ly/1aKy7km A global cureFor all the debate about healthcare in the U.S., it's easy to lose sight of the fundamental problems plaguing medical systems in other parts of the world. In developing countries, people often die from lack of basic medicines, blood or operable surgical equipment. During one of her first classes at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, chemical engineering major Carolyn Yarina stumbled upon this reality. Assigned an open-ended engineering challenge, Yarina turned to a campus club that had recently surveyed rural health workers. One of the needs in Africa, the survey found, was a centrifuge that could run without electricity, allowing clinicians to diagnose and treat diseases in areas without power. Yarina took on the challenge, and by the end of the semester she and a team of students created a human-powered centrifuge built from bicycle parts. It was a neat engineering feat, and Yarina didn't want the idea to die with the end of the class. So she created a student group called CentriCycle to continue work on the project. She also enrolled in entrepreneurship classes, including a practicum in social entrepreneurship, which convinced her to go to India for the first time. "I learned a lot on that trip, which led to a lot of changes," she recalls. "I realized what they needed on the ground, and using a bicycle was not the best idea." Returning to India over the next two summers, she refined her concept and developed contacts. After graduating in 2013, she worked on her centrifuge full time, eventually developing a portable machine dubbed (r)Evolve that can alternate between manual power and electricity. She also lined up engineering and manufacturing support in India. But it dawned on Yarina that she needed to go further. "Once I created our student organization and started going to business classes, I had an epiphany," she says. "Open-source designs are not a viable option if you actually want to get your product out there. If it was just about creating a process to separate blood, we would have been done four years ago." Early this year, she and CentriCycle member Katie Kirsch teamed up with another University of Michigan grad, Gillian Henker, who is developing Hemafuse, an auto-transfusion pump for blood. Together, they started Sisu Global Health, a socially conscious for-profit company, as a platform to deliver medical products designed specifically for the needs of developing countries. The centrifuge and auto-transfusion pump are their first two offerings. "Eighty percent of medical products are designed for 10 percent of the world," Yarina explains. "Designing for that other 90 percent is what we want to do." The 24-year-old says she never expected to be at the helm of a company, but she's glad her life has taken this turn. "During freshman orientation they took us on a tour of the Center for Entrepreneurship. I remember I couldn't wait to get out of there," she says. "I never thought I'd do anything with entrepreneurship. After learning how to turn this idea into something that could impact people's lives, I've realized entrepreneurship can be more about making an impact than making money." Get your Free Business Plan Template here: http://bit.ly/1aKy7km
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Photos du journal - Tear Escola de Negócios | Facebook

Photos du journal - Tear Escola de Negócios | Facebook | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
“Você acha que o mercado está competitivo? Bruno Perin, grande nome do Neuroempreendedorismo no Brasil revela que isso depende apenas de você. Saiba...”
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How a tiny startup became the leader in the race to power your smart home

“The smart home race has a new competitor. We take a tour through a Soho apartment powered by Wink and its smart home hub. Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=theverge.”
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PMI-RS - Neuroempreendedorismo e Startups encerraram o primeiro dia de palestras

PMI-RS - Neuroempreendedorismo e Startups encerraram o primeiro dia de palestras | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
“PMI-RS (Neuroempreendedorismo e Startups encerram o primeiro dia de palestras. Saiba mais sobre as palestras: http://t.co/IE6KK6NkDf)”
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Os dois maiores ladrões da sua produtividade

Os dois maiores ladrões da sua produtividade | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
“A indecisão e a incerteza sobre qual caminho você vai tomar podem roubar todo o seu tempo (Os dois maiores ladrões da sua produtividade http://t.co/KlGqyvG29U)...”
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Canaltech Startup #1: dica para desbloquear sua criatividade - YouTube

Canaltech Startup #1: dica para desbloquear sua criatividade - YouTube | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
A partir de hoje, o Canaltech dá início a uma série de vídeos relacionados ao mundo do empreendedorismo e das startups. Todas as segundas-feiras, o consultor...
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Startup implanta método on-line de preparação para concursos ...

Startup implanta método on-line de preparação para concursos ... | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
“Para isso ele criou o grupo Estudo ao Vivo, dentro das plataformas Elo Concursos, de preparação para concursos públicos, e Exato Vestibulares, de preparação para vestibulares e Enem. A startup aposta em aulas online ao ...”
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Concurso Nacional de Startups: inscreva-se - Empreendedores ...

Concurso Nacional de Startups: inscreva-se - Empreendedores ... | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
“Estão abertas até 31 de julho as inscrições para o Concurso Nacional de Startups, promovido pela Anjos do Brasil. Além de promover os conceitos de startups ao público geral, o programa visa incentivar o ...”
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Turismo é oportunidade de negócio para startups | Publituris

Turismo é oportunidade de negócio para startups | Publituris | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
“A conferência, que apresenta algumas das startups mais inovadoras na área, discutirá ainda a forma como a inovação e o empreendedorismo são ingredientes-chaves para projectar, ainda mais e de forma diferenciada, ...”
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Living Large in a Tiny Home | Startups | NBC News - YouTube

Living Large in a Tiny Home | Startups | NBC News - YouTube | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
Small house evangelist and founder of Four Lights Tiny House Company, Jay Shafer talks about the inspiration behind his small home designs and takes us on a ...
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BID seleciona startups mais inovadoras da América Latina e Caribe ...

BID seleciona startups mais inovadoras da América Latina e Caribe ... | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
“Com o objetivo de divulgar e conectar soluções inovadoras e empreendimentos criativos da América Latina e do Caribe com o mundo, o Banco Interamericano de Desenvolvimento (BID) selecionará as 15 startups mais ...”
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Babbage: The "full stack" startup - YouTube

Babbage: The "full stack" startup - YouTube | Startup Brasil | Scoop.it
Are we in a tech bubble? Ben Horowitz, a Silicon Valley venture capitalist and author, tells us where the smart money should be headed. For more video conten...
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