Stage 2 British Colonisation
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Women in colonial times | australia.gov.au

Women in colonial times | australia.gov.au | Stage 2 British Colonisation | Scoop.it
Van Anh Ha's insight:

This government website provides information about some significant female women during the colonial times. Since men had a lot of power during this part of history, it is great for students to learn about the lives of women. The website provides a short biography for three women, with different status and backgrounds. This variety enables students to gain a firm understanding of the freedom that women had depending on their background, and that the power distribution was very male centred.

 

The class can learn about each of those women, by reading their biography, watching videos and finding out some of their significant works. To further their knowledge about these women, they can form small groups to perform a short re-enactment of their lives. Another activity to further students’ understanding is to place a student in the hot seat. This is effective after they have some knowledge about their lives. Students must stay in their chosen role and answer questions to give extra information about the woman. 

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Arthur Phillip | State Library of New South Wales

Arthur Phillip | State Library of New South Wales | Stage 2 British Colonisation | Scoop.it

The New South Wales State Library is a reliable resource because it is a large public facility and is under the control of the government. When looking at the original letter written by Arthur Phillip, it must be authentic and genuine. The website shows photographs of the letter that Arthur Phillip wrote to the Marquis of Lansdowne on 3 July 1788. As well as having the manuscript, there is also a transcript, which is convenient especially when the handwriting is harder to read. All the errors in the original letter were kept as it is in the transcript to ensure that the authenticity to kept.

This letter can be compared to another text, which demonstrates the perspective of an Aboriginal person, or it can be placed side by side with another significant person. While students can compare and contrast the facts presented by both texts, they can also write their own letter. They could possibly write a reply to Arthur Phillip’s letter, write the next letter to be mailed to the Marquis, or write in the perspective of an Aboriginal person who had been in contact with Arthur Phillip. 

Arthur Phillip
Van Anh Ha's insight:

The New South Wales State Library is a reliable resource because it is a large public facility and is under the control of the government. When looking at the original letter written by Arthur Phillip, it must be authentic and genuine. The website shows photographs of the letter that Arthur Phillip wrote to the Marquis of Lansdowne on 3 July 1788. As well as having the manuscript, there is also a transcript, which is convenient especially when the handwriting is harder to read. All the errors in the original letter were kept as it is in the transcript to ensure that the authenticity to kept.

 

This letter can be compared to another text, which demonstrates the perspective of an Aboriginal person, or it can be placed side by side with another significant person. While students can compare and contrast the facts presented by both texts, they can also write their own letter. They could possibly write a reply to Arthur Phillip’s letter, write the next letter to be mailed to the Marquis, or write in the perspective of an Aboriginal person who had been in contact with Arthur Phillip.

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1788 | Australia's migration history timeline | NSW Migration Heritage Centre

1788 | Australia's migration history timeline | NSW Migration Heritage Centre | Stage 2 British Colonisation | Scoop.it
Van Anh Ha's insight:

The NSW Migration Heritage Centre preserves the events related to migration and settlement in New South Wales from 1788. This website provides relevant and detailed information about significant events since the arrival of the first fleet until the modern day concept of multiculturalism. This is a great resource for creating a timeline, and linking Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE) to mathematics.

 

This would be effective at the beginning of the unit on British Colonisation, but is also suitable to be continually added to as students learn about significant events. Some of these events can include: 50,000 years ago-The Aboriginal population in Australia, 1788-Arrival of the First Fleet, 1800s-Aboriginal Protection Policy, 1900s-Federation, World War I and II, Now-Multiculturalism. A discussion could be stimulated about the grouping of events, with specific dates or in groups by decades. This would emphasise the importance and effectiveness of using different mathematical methods to demonstrate information. 

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Parramatta - Creative Spirits

Parramatta - Creative Spirits | Stage 2 British Colonisation | Scoop.it
Van Anh Ha's insight:

Despite this website not being a government website, it appears to be a great resource for relating significant Aboriginal places. The website contains many other resources for learning about the Aboriginal culture. Students can learn about how and why specific places are of importance to Aboriginal people. After learning about it in class, they can then connect their learning to a real and meaningful experience. This activity provides students with the opportunity to connect the past with the present, and find out about the impact of colonisation on significant Aboriginal sites, knowing that the Aboriginal culture is now celebrated.

 

Students can learn about the general sites that are of importance to Aboriginal people, and then connect it to a specific place. They conduct their own research into the Parramatta area, in small groups. As a class, they can locate the places and mark them on a map, which they will investigate while on an excursion. While on the excursion, they can be asked to do a rough sketch of the different places that they learnt about.

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Papunya School Book of Country and History

Papunya School Book of Country and History | Stage 2 British Colonisation | Scoop.it
Van Anh Ha's insight:

The book Papunya School of Country and History by Diane de Vere and Nadia Wheatley retells the experiences of some Aboriginal people from when the first settlers arrived and when they lived on missionaries and pastoralists. This book provides a different perspective on the arrival of the First Fleet. Hearing a variety of perspectives enables students to develop their critical thinking to decide whether a source is valid and reliable. According to Behar-Horenstein and Niu (2011), being able to make informed judgements using valid evidence is necessary in modern society.

 

As a class, the story can be read the first time for enjoyment and for understanding of the plot and characters. Smaller groups can then be formed, each focusing on small sections of the plot: introduction of the Aboriginal people, the Aboriginal culture, the effects of the Western culture on the Aboriginal people, and reconciliation. As a group, they summarise and re-write their section of the story and use symbols to represent the most significant words in their writing. For example, in the line “I realized we were living in a different world now. It was someone else’s world,” the word ‘world’ could be replaced with a symbol of the earth.

 

Behar-Horenstein, L.S., & Niu, L. (2011). Teaching critical thinking skills in higher education: A review of the literature. Journal of College Teaching and Learning, 8(2).

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