Environments: everyday words for location, position and direction, eg left, right, mountain, city.
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Barnaby Bear's World Map + Activities

Barnaby Bear's World Map + Activities | Environments: everyday words for location, position and direction, eg left, right, mountain, city. | Scoop.it

This resource (map) is to be used with the activities under the title Barnaby Bear's World Map, found at:  http://www.barnabybear.co.uk/main.asp?pageID=21

Alyssa Sadowskyj's insight:

Barnaby Bear's World map is a resource that can be used to integrate a Global perspective across the Curriculum.  This resource has been chosen in accordance to the Global Perspectives: a framework for global education in Australian schools, with a learning emphasis on Interdependence and Globalisation.  Throughout the activity, students will identify and recognise the geographical features of Interdependence such as “the spatial interactions between people and places and how they change over time” (Global Education, 2011, p. 8). 

 

Barnaby Bear’s World Map and the accompanying work sheet sourced from:  http://www.barnabybear.co.uk/documents/barnaby_worldmapactivity3.pdf is aimed at Stage 1 students.  Barnaby Bear travels around the world introducing students to places in the UK and abroad.  Students follow Barnaby Bear on his travels around the world.  They learn about their local area and develop an understanding of maps by learning facts, locational knowledge and gaining geographical skills.  This is an effective teaching resource to explore the HSIE outcome ENS1.5:  “Compares and contrasts natural and built features in their local area and the ways in which people interact with these features” (BOS, 2006, p. 48). 

 

A student centred activity can be completed to assist students in answering the following focus questions:  "What can maps tell us?' and "How do I read a map?"  Students examine Barnaby Bear’s World Map and answer the questions found on the worksheet, either individually or in pairs.  The learning experience will encourage students to use and practice “everyday words for location, position and direction, e.g. left, right, mountain, city” (BOS, 2006, p. 49).  

 

The aforementioned activity could be used to link with other KLA’s, such as English.  Students build their literacy skills through “speaking” and “writing” - two objectives outlined in the English K-10 Syllabus.  Students will “EN1-1A:  communicate with a range of people in informal and guided activities demonstrating interaction skills” (BOS, 2012, p. 53) and “EN1-2A:  plan, compose and review a small range of simple texts for a variety of purposes on familiar topics for known readers and viewers” (p. 55). 

 

To further extend this learning activity, teachers should visit the BBC website:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/barnabybear/ for more Barnaby Bear resources, including:  stories; interactive games; Barnaby’s photo albums, scrapbook and Barnaby’s contact details. 

 

 

References:

 

Barnaby Bear. (Unknown). Barnaby Bear Activity Worksheet: I can read Barnaby’s World Map. Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://www.barnabybear.co.uk/documents/barnaby_worldmapactivity3.pdf

 

BBC. (2014). Barnaby Bear Resources. Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/barnabybear/

 

BOS. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus.  Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/go/hsie

 

BOS. (2012). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum:  English K-10 Syllabus. Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/download/

 

Global Education. (2011). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian schools. Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from:  http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/verve/_resources/GPS_web.pdf

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MATH Lesson Plan

MATH Lesson Plan | Environments: everyday words for location, position and direction, eg left, right, mountain, city. | Scoop.it
Children will go on a Shape Hunt around the classroom to identify and recognize the various shapes in a book.
Alyssa Sadowskyj's insight:

“Rosie’s Walk” is simple story of Rosie the hen, who decides to leave the chicken coop and sets out for a walk across the farm.  Right behind Rosie, a slyly fox is trying to catch her.  Rosie's walk is uneventful and eventually leads her back across the farm to the chicken coop.  She is unaware of the fox's efforts as he tries - unsuccessfully - to navigate through the obstacle course that Rosie has led him (Hutchins, 1968).  After reading Rosie’s Walk, a focus question could be “How can we map Rosie’s walk around the farm?” developed from the subject matter “everyday words to describe the location, position and direction” (BOS, 2006, p. 49). 


The following digital website:  http://www.mathathome.org/LessonPlans/WalkWithRosie/LessonPlanWalkWithRosieWeb.php provides teachers with activities to help students answer the above focus question.  All the activities are built around encouraging the development of positional vocabulary including:  “In front of – located before or ahead of; Next to - beside, along; Behind – at the back of; Under – on a lower level than; Above – physically over, on top of; On - positioned at the upper surface of, touching from above; Near – close to; Far – distance in space or time; Inside – interior, in something” (M.A.T.H, 2011). 


A formative assessment that gauges whether students have understood positional language could consist of students drawing and annotating their own map of the farm.  On the IWB, the teacher creates a word bank with all the positional terminology needed.  Students imagine that they are Rosie on her walk and write a recount of the journey Rosie takes.  They should include words from the word bank.  The activity integrates across other KLA’s, such as English.  Students “EN1-2A:  plan, compose and review a small range of simple texts for a variety of purposes on familiar topics” (BOS, 2012, p. 55). 


A benefit of using formative assessment is that it allows for a “continuous monitoring of the teaching and learning process, which ensures effectiveness” (McInerney and McInerney, 2010, p. 360).  After collecting the students work, the teacher can assess:  How well the students are learning? What do they appear not to understand? and What have they achieved?  Another way the students’ learning goals can be measured is simply through teacher observation whilst the activity is in progress. 

 


References:

BOS. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus.  Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/go/hsie

 

BOS. (2012). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum:  English K-10 Syllabus. Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/download/

 

Hutchins, P. (1968). Rosie’s walk.  New York : Macmillan. 

M.A.T.H. (2011). Take a Walk with Rosie. Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://www.mathathome.org/LessonPlans/WalkWithRosie/LessonPlanWalkWithRosieWeb.php

 

McInerney, D., & McInerney, V.  (2010). Educational Psychology: Constructing Learning. NSW: Pearsons Australia.

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Dean Dray's curator insight, August 13, 2014 9:03 AM

Great resource created by a friend from Uni

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Mapping Penny's World - YouTube

Alyssa Sadowskyj's insight:

“Mapping Penny’s World” by Loreen Leedy is a quality children’s picture book, which is appropriate for Stage 1.  Through the exploration of this picture book students discover how to read maps and key features of maps.  This allows for the investigation of “everyday words for location, position and direction, e.g. left, right, mountain, city” (BOS, 2006, p. 49).

 

This book could be used to introduce children to maps because the maps are very simple and easy to follow.  Lisa maps places where her dog Penny enjoys exploring around the house, neighbourhood and town.  Her maps include:  a compass, a scale, and a key in order to accurately read a map.  Lisa also explains that maps can show a view from above; maps can be useful for giving directions, and a map’s scale can be used to determine real distances of the mapped area (Leedy, 2010). 

 

Using this book with an inquiry learning approach can promote critical thinking and cooperative learning (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).   Before reading the picture book a focus question “What makes a map a map?” can be developed.  After reading Mapping Penny’s World students should be able to answer the focus question as the book includes a number of maps with titles, keys, scales and compasses.

 

In the video, props were used while reading the book to expand imagination and reinforce abstract concepts.  Props (soft toys, puppets, musical instruments and non-specific props such as a scarf) are useful teaching resources when reading and can enhance the meaning the meaning of the story.  However, the story should be the focus; and the props should not detract from the overall meaning of the text (Ferguson, 2007). 

 

After reading the text, students could make their own map of a familiar place, such as their bedroom, classroom, neighbourhood, or school.  The map should include a title that relates to the map and a key with symbols and words.  This teaching activity will assist students in identifying symbols and locations of symbols on a map. 

 

A formative assessment could be a discussion about the maps the students have created.  In pairs, students take turns and pick an object from their map, and the other student asks questions using positional language to pinpoint the object (e.g. symbol, building, object, etc.). 

 

References: 

 

BOS. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus.  Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/go/hsie

  

Ferguson, B. (2007). Storytelling with Children in the Early Years.  Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://www.scottishstorytellingcentre.co.uk/education/SRresources/earlyyearsstarter.pdf

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (Eds). (2011). Teaching Society and Environment.  Australia: Cengage Learning. 

 

Leedy, L. (2010). Mapping Penny’s World.  USA:  Paw Prints.

 

Unknown. (2013). Mapping Penny’s World. Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9ZgkN6TVk0

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ENS1.5 Unit of Work

Full credit goes to: State of NSW DET (2010).

Alyssa Sadowskyj's insight:

This is a teaching resource that focuses on “Local Places in the Environment” for Stage One (DET, 2010).  The Unit of Work provides students with learning experiences that link across the curriculum into Creative Arts, PDHPE and Science and Technology.  Although the entire Unit of Work is valuable, the learning experience “exploring space and location through dance” (DET, 2010, p. 11) explicitly covers the subject matter “everyday words for location, position and direction, e.g. left, right, mountain, city” (BOS, 2006, p. 49). 

 

The activity contains a direct link to Creative Arts: Dance “DAS1.1:  Performs dances demonstrating expressive qualities and control over a range of locomotor and non locomotor movement” (BOS, 2006, p 41) as well as PDHPE “DAS1.7:  Performs simple dance sequences incorporating basic movement skills and patterns” (BOS, 2007, p. 27).  Through participation of the Movement Game “Near and Far”, students will develop sensory awareness of their location in space and the environment. 

 

Firstly, it is important to introduce students to positional vocabulary (e.g. North, South, East, West, up, down, etc) before commencing the game.  One way to build students vocabulary could be to watch “Preposition” (The Bazillions, 2010) sourced from:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byszemY8Pl8.  Students watch the video though once; watch the video a second time and write down three positional words.  After the second viewing, in pairs students create actions based on the positional words. 

 

Once the students have grasped the concept of positional words, play the Movement Game.  To play the game the teacher must identify locations within the room:  North, South, East, West, up, down, etc.  When the teachers signals, the students must follow the instruction, e.g. “I want everyone to move:  as close as possible to each other in the centre of the room without touching; as far away from each other as possible; to the north, south, east and west” (DET, 2010, p. 11).

 

This learning experience is a form of active learning, “Tell me, and I will forget.  Show me, and I may remember.  Involve me, and I will understand” (Unknown, cited in Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p.143).  Implementing active learning experiences in the classroom has been encouraged “for their effect on engaging students and improving motivation” (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p.144).  The aforementioned activity demonstrates active learning as it involves students developing higher order thinking skills, increasing their depth of knowledge and connecting concepts to the real world.

 

 

References: 


BOS. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus.  Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/go/hsie

 

BOS. (2006). Creative Arts K-6 Syllabus.  Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/go/creative-arts

 

BOS. (2006). Science and Technology K-6 Syllabus.  Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/go/science-and-technology

 

BOS. (2007). Personal Development, Health and Physical Education (PDHPE) K-6 Syllabus.  Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/go/personal-development-health-and-physical-education-pdhpe

 

DET. (2010). COGs Unit S1:  Local Places.  Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/timetoteach/cogs/unitss1.htm

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (Eds). (2011). Teaching Society and Environment.  Australia: Cengage Learning.  

The Bazillions. (2010). Preposition. (Recorded by The Bazillions). On Youtube. Minneapolis, USA.

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Bangu the Flying Fox: Teachers' Notes

Alyssa Sadowskyj's insight:

“Bangu the Flying Fox” is originally a Dreaming story told by the Umbarra Cultural Tour Group from Wallaga Lake, on the far south of New South Wales.  This area has been home to the Yuin people for many thousands of years.  With permission, this story has been retold by Jillian Taylor, and illustrated by Penny Jones and Aaron Norris (Aboriginal Studies Press, 2010). 

 

After examining the Aboriginal Education K-12 Resource Guide (2003) Bangu the Flying Fox:  Teachers’ notes meet the requirements of the following selection criteria.  The resource acknowledges Aboriginal participation in the research, writing and presentation process, as mentioned in the authors notes “with kind permission from Mervyn Penrith and the Umbarra Cultural Tour Group, this story is retold” (Aboriginal Studies Press, 2010, p. 3).  The resource has also been endorsed and supported by AIATSIS to provide a more authentic and accurate view of Indigenous people and their cultures, suggested by “all efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of this material” (p. 3). 

 

An inquiry based activity found within Bangu the Flying Fox:  Teachers’ notes focuses on mapping, relates to the outcome “ENS1.5:  Compares and contrasts natural and built features in their local area and the ways in which people interact with these features” (BOS, 2006, p. 48).  Part A:  See students using an outlined “mainstream” map of Australia, to identify where New South Wales is; where Lake Wallaga (origin of Dreaming story) is; and where the students live.  Part B:  Sees students comparing and contrasting an Aboriginal Australia map sourced from:  http://www.abc.net.au/indigenous/map/ to a “mainstream” map of Australia.  As per the selection criteria by providing both an Aboriginal map and a “mainstream” map of Australia the students receive an unbiased and non-distorted perspective of Aboriginal peoples and their cultures (DET, 2003). 

 

On completion of the activity, there should be a discussion to highlight the differences and/or similarities between the two maps.  Students should be able to explain what the coloured areas of the map represent.  As the Dreaming story originates in the traditional country of the Yuin nation, it is important for the students to locate the nation on both maps.  An extension activity could include students identifying the language groups from the land that which they live and mark the location on their map. 

 

 

References:

 

Aboriginal Studies Press. (2010). Teachers’ Notes: Bangu the Flying Fox. Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://www.aiatsis.gov.au/_files/asp/educators/bangu_notes_final.pdf

 

Aboriginal Studies Press & AIATSIS. (1996). Aboriginal Australia Map. Retrieved 6 April, 2014 http://www.abc.net.au/indigenous/map/images/indigi_map.png

 

BOS. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/go/hsie

 

DET. (2003). Aboriginal Education K-12 Resource Guide. Retrieved 6 April, 2014 from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/assets/pdf/aboriginalresourceguide.pdf

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