HSIE Stage 1 Identities - Groups to which students belong, including the family
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Tom Tom by Rosemary Sullivan and Dee Huxley

Tom Tom by Rosemary Sullivan and Dee Huxley | HSIE Stage 1 Identities - Groups to which students belong, including the family | Scoop.it
Rebecca Lewis's insight:

“Tom Tom” written by Rosemary Sullivan and illustrated by Dee Huxley is a prime resource that can be utilized within a stage one classroom. “Tom Tom is the story of a day in the life of a small Aboriginal boy in the imaginary Aboriginal community of Lemonade Springs, in the Northern Territory. It provides a vivid and authentic illustration of life in an Aboriginal community, and of the ambience of those long, free days of childhood, when Aboriginal children roam from place to place, visiting various relatives, climbing trees, chasing lizards, kicking footballs or playing in the mud. It is a book about freedom and the interconnectedness of family and place” (Sullivan, 2010).

 

This resource has been chosen in accordance to the “Aboriginal Education K-12 Resource Guide” (NSW DET, 2003). The picture book itself is authentic because the material is up to date, there are no over generalizations, the illustrations are relevant to the text and provide accurate portrayals of the Indigenous People. The material found within the text contains no stereotypes and there is no bias/ distortion of issues. Accuracy and support is also highlighted as the story was written after the author immersed herself within the Aboriginal culture (p.17). 

 

The story Tom Tom highlights the importance of family relationships; one of the groups the students within a classroom belongs to (BOS, 2006). Aboriginal people tend to have larger families.  An Aboriginal family extends beyond the birth mother and father and includes others in their community who have a relationship with that child (Byers, Kulitja, Lowell & Kruske, 2012). Through reading this book students can begin to get an understanding of the concept of Aboriginal families. One activity that can stem from the exploration of this picture book is the idea of creating family trees.

 

As a class students can construct a family tree based on Tom Tom’s family. Sample questions taken from Activity two “Who are the People in my Family?” (Global Education, 2014) include “who are the people in Tom Tom’s family? How is this the same or different from your family? What do the people in Tom Tom’s family do? How is this the same or different from your family?” This can then be displayed for everyone to see. Students can then design their own family tree based upon members of their family. Using a T-chart and the family trees students can then outline the similarities and differences, allowing them to see that there are many different types of families.

 

A link to numeracy can occur here as well with students looking at the number of people in their family compared to the number of people in another class member’s family. The teacher can then construct a line graph/ bar graph with the class to help students visualise the differences. Other ways to link to numeracy include asking questions such as “what is the largest family? What is the smallest family” (Global Education, 2014)? This activity can also link back into the QTF as it asks students to bring in pictures of their own family making this idea significant to their own learning.

 

Whilst the picture book is something the students can pick up and read there is a wealth of information as well as other teaching resources available for teachers at http://www.lemonadesprings.com.au. This digital resource provides teachers with background knowledge as well as answers to frequently asked questions.

 

 

Reference:

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). K-6 HSIE Syllabus. Retrieved March 27, 2014 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/hsie/k6_hsie_syl.pdf

 

Byers, L., Kulitja, S., Lowell, A., & Kruske, S. (2012). ‘Hear our Stories’: Child-rearing practices of a remote Australian Aboriginal community. The Australian Journal of Rural Health, 20(6), 293-297. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1584.2012.01317.x


Department of Education and Training. (2003). Aboriginal education K-12 resource guide. Retrieved March 27, 2014 from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/assets/pdf/aboriginalresourceguide.pdf

 

Department of Education and Training. (2003). Quality teaching in NSW public schools. Retrieved March 30, 2014, from:

https://www.det.nsw.edu.au/proflearn/docs/pdf/qt_EPSColor.pdf

 

Global Education. (2014). Who are the families of the world. Retrieved March 27, 2014, from http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/teaching-activity/who-are-the-families-of-the-world-f-2.html#activity2

 

Sullivan, R. (2010) Welcome: Lemonade Springs. Retrieved March 27, 2014, from http://www.lemonadesprings.com.au

Sullivan, R. (2012) Tom Tom. Adelaide: Working Tiltle Press.

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Groups We Belong To - Science NetLinks

Groups We Belong To - Science NetLinks | HSIE Stage 1 Identities - Groups to which students belong, including the family | Scoop.it
In this lesson, students will begin to think about and identify different kinds of groups.
Rebecca Lewis's insight:

“A very effective way to teach students about groups at this level is to use their own experiences to help them make explicit their intuitive notions about groups and related behavior” (AAAS, 2014). That notion of linking prior knowledge to new knowledge is echoed in the Quality Teaching Framework (QTF) designed by the DET (2003) with one of the three sections focusing upon significance.

 

“Significance refers to pedagogy that helps make learning meaningful and important to students. Such pedagogy draws clear connections with students’ prior knowledge and identities, with contexts outside of the classroom, and with multiple ways of knowing or cultural perspectives” (DET, 2003). Furthermore the resource continues to comply with the QTF as it helps to form a quality-learning environment since the lesson plan uses explicit quality criteria.

 

Engagement is high due to constant student participation and the classroom environment provides high social support. The third aspect of the QTF is also seen (intellectual property) as students are being encouraged to use higher-order thinking and to communicate about what they are learning.

 

The resource provides another lesson that can be implemented straight into the classroom. The aim of the lesson (to help students identify the kinds of groups they are born into and join) is clear and the activities presented help to accomplish the aim. The resource uses discussion as its main form thus allowing for communication. It also provides sample assessment tasks, and an extension task.

 

Overall this lesson addresses the outcome CUS1.3 with a specific focus on groups students belong to including the family, with a link to their prior knowledge (students identifying their own groups and how they become members) whilst allowing the students to learn new knowledge (understanding the difference of groups from birth/ groups you join).

 

Reference:

AAAS. (2014). Groups we belong to. Retrieved March 30, 2014 from:

http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/groups-we-belong-to/

 

Department of Education and Training. (2003). Quality teaching in NSW public schools. Retrieved March 30, 2014, from:

https://www.det.nsw.edu.au/proflearn/docs/pdf/qt_EPSColor.pdf

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Where you belong/ Group needs

Rebecca Lewis's insight:

During stage 1 HSIE, students are required to learn about “groups to which students belong, including the family”. The following resource found at www.census.gov gives two lesson plans based around the topics of groups in general and group needs.

 

The first lesson plan sees students identifying different groups they belong to, as well as using counting techniques (cross curricular link to mathematics) to take a census of their class and as extension their family. The second lesson begins to get students to start thinking about the needs of different groups and why there are differences and/ or similarities.

 

This resource can be taken straight from the website and implemented into a classroom. It gives a general idea of the entire outcome (CUS1.3), and can then be taken further to include different cultural groups, which the students can research with the help of their own families or the teacher. 
 

The activities listed can be completed as a whole class, in pairs or individually. As a whole class the students can think about and with hands raised tell the teacher about the different needs they can think of. Once there are a few on the board the students can be broken into pairs to complete the worksheet. This sees the students thinking about the needs of the class, family and community and sorting the ideas from the board into the correct category

 

The worksheets provided within the resource allows the teacher to informally assess the students understanding of groups. Through completing the worksheets the students are showing that they understand how grouping works, as well as identifying the needs of the listed groups including similarities and differences.

 

Reference:

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). K-6 HSIE Syllabus. Retrieved March 27, 2014 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/hsie/k6_hsie_syl.pdf

 

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Who are the families of the world? Global Education

Who are the families of the world? Global Education | HSIE Stage 1 Identities - Groups to which students belong, including the family | Scoop.it
Rebecca Lewis's insight:

Including a global perspective within the primary classroom is not only important but a necessity. In the early years (early stage 1 and stage 1), “students explore how individuals, including children, are connected to other people and places” (Australian Government, 2008). The following resource “Who are the Families Around the World” found at

http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/teaching-activity/who-are-the-families-of-the-world-f-2.html#activity1 provides teachers with activities that can be taken straight into the classroom and is aimed at the stage one level.

 

When looking at the Global Perspectives Framework (2008) the following resource fits into not only the values and attitudes section “a sense of personal identity, self-esteem and a sense of community with people around the world and a positive attitude towards diversity and difference” (p.6), but also the knowledge and understanding strand as students develop “an appreciation of diversity and the contributions of different cultures, values and belief systems” (p.6). The third strand “skills and processes” sees students developing their critical literacy skills as they are “considering different points of view, gaining a critical awareness of bias, opinion and stereotypes; learning to become critical consumers of the media and analyzing information to help them make judgments to deal with contentious and complex issues” (p.7).

 

The activity “We are Family” - activity one (Global Education, 2014) focuses upon syllabus outcome CUS1.3 and more specifically “groups which students belong, including the family”. Activity one delves into the concept of family and sees students using photographs of families around the world and think, pair, share to think about what family is, what family means to them and the reason(s) why they like the chosen photo. Other key features of this activity include students looking at similarities and differences between the families in the photographs and their own family. This allows students to see individual families as a group, which is both similar and different to their own. Literacy is highlighted as students are asked to write a sentence (or paragraph depending on the level) of what family means to them once they have consulted with their partner.

 

Overall this is a fantastic resource as it gets the students active in their learning and gets them to think about the concept of family and what it means to them.

 

Reference:

Australian Government. (2008). Global perspectives: a framework for global education in Australian schools. Carlton South Victoria: Curriculum Corporation.

 

Global Education. (2014). Who are the families of the world. Retrieved March 27, 2014, from http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/teaching-activity/who-are-the-families-of-the-world-f-2.html#activity1

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We Belong to Many Groups - Food & Fun

We Belong to Many Groups - Food & Fun | HSIE Stage 1 Identities - Groups to which students belong, including the family | Scoop.it
Food & Fun Afterschool Curriculum
Rebecca Lewis's insight:

Games or “learning by doing” (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p.143) are a great way to engage students and help them learn key concepts through active learning. Gilbert and Hoepper (2011) explain that “active and experimental strategies are part of the broader inquiry or problem based approaches to learning” (p.143).  

 

The formation of groups the students belong to including the family is no exception. Coccari (2011) explains how “games can help to get unmotivated students excited… and reach students who don’t respond to conventional teaching methods.”  He then continues on to say that through games “kids feel themselves improving, games allow for instant feedback and create interactive experiences” thus engaging them. Motivation occurs, as there is some “healthy competition, progression occurs, games can be customized to suit the students and rewards can be given.”

 

The following link has a game that all students are able to participate in. Whilst it is originally orientated towards students participating in an afterschool activity it can easily be adapted to work within the classroom. This link provides direct instructions on how to implement the game. If there is no available outside space to use, then chairs and tables can be pushed against walls and the activity can be used in doors.

 

This game can be used as an introduction to the topic, with the teacher having a premade list of different groups including the whole class and then smaller groups (groups can include: Who is part of 1S? who goes to ____ scripture? Who is the oldest/ youngest/ middle in the family? Etc.) It is important to note that any group chosen needs to include more than one student.  If this activity is being utilized later in the topic the students within the class can then make their own lists and with teacher permission one student can then call out the groups (become the teacher).

 

This can also be used as a form of informal assessment as it allows for the teacher to observe the students and make sure they understand that there are many different groups and that they do not have to belong to all of them.

 

Overall this resource allows for active learning to occur as it promotes higher order thinking; allows for the students to deepen their prior knowledge; It is connected to real life experiences; It allows for communication between peers with a cross curricular link to the English syllabus EN1-1A – “a student: communicates with a range of people in informal and guided activities demonstrating interaction skills and considers how own communication is adjusted in different situations;” and social support in that the classroom provides a location where all students are required to contribute and achieve the learning goals (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p.143-144).

 

 

Reference:

BOS (2012). English K-10 syllabus: volume 1: English K-6. Sydney: Board of Studies

 

Coccari, A. (2011). Games for learning: why games are effective educational tools. Retrieved March 31, 2014, from:

http://interactioneducation.com/index_files/games_for_learning.html#.UzjNUdwVfwI

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment (4th Edition). Australia: Cengage Learning Pty Limited.

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