Sports Public Relations via Social Media
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Sports Public Relations via Social Media
Social media has given sports public relations professionals an opportunity to capitalize on social media trends, let's see how they do.
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Micky and Madeleine Arison Family Foundation Gives $250,000 Matching Donation for Louisiana Flood Relief Raising Total Contribution From Carnival Cruise-Related Organizations to Half-a-Million Dollars

Micky and Madeleine Arison Family Foundation Gives $250,000 Matching Donation for Louisiana Flood Relief Raising Total Contribution From Carnival Cruise-Related Organizations to Half-a-Million Dollars | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it
MIAMI, Aug. 25, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Micky and Madeleine Arison Family Foundation Gives $250,000 Matching Donation for Louisiana Flood Relief Raisin
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Tennessee volunteers its athletes up to social media

Tennessee volunteers its athletes up to social media | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

          Tennessee doesn’t ban social media, they embrace it. The Tennessee Volunteers basketball team is concentrating on learning how to use Twitter for branding purposes. Many other teams are trying to keep their players from posting on social network sites, but Tennessee is encouraging it. The university has gone as far as to post the players’ twitter handles on their team bios.

          Personally, I think the people at Tennessee are much more forward-thinking than many of their collegiate counterparts. Social media is about branding and what better way for an up and coming athlete to brand themselves than to use a medium that his/her fans have utilize on a daily basis. Tennessee is setting its athletes up for branding success, why wouldn’t other universities want to do the same?

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Soccer makes a major score with social media

Soccer makes a major score with social media | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

         Spain’s LigaBBVA soccer team owes much of its social media success to the online branding of their players. Players such as Kaka and Cristiano Ronaldo have been instrumental in the social media success of their team. This leads to an interesting question. Is a team’s social media success owed to the team’s social media brand or is it due to the individual branding and likeability of its players?

          While some may argue that a team should be able to brand itself, I believe that the players play a huge role in the online acceptance of their team. The players are the real stars of the game, thus, followers expect to have online contact with them. If an athlete retweets a fan’s tweet it can go a long way in establishing a powerful interpersonal relationship online. Thus, I believe that a team’s social media success relies heavily on the individual athlete’s ability to engage their audience.

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WWE - Turning fans into stars

WWE - Turning fans into stars | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

          Is a social media show the next step in our tech savvy world? The WWE is considering developing an hour-long pregame show purely devoted to social media. They’ve already found success with their numerous social media accounts so one would expect that this endeavor may also succeed with their tech savvy fans.

          I think a WWE related social media show could definitely garner some interest from fans. Sports fans haven’t typically been given the opportunity to give their opinions about their favorite athlete or sports team. With the advent of social media, sports fans are now able to be commentators, engage with their favorite sports teams and athletes, and feel more included in their sports viewing experience. By taking Tweets or posts from Facebook and putting them into an organized pre-game show format, I think the WWE may have struck gold. Not only are they engaging their fans, they’re making them stars in their own right.

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WWE a leader in social media integration

WWE a leader in social media integration | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

          The WWE is on the cutting edge of the social media revolution. WWE recently distinguished itself from other sports social media adopters; they now have 100 million followers. The WWE understands the importance of social media in today’s market. Unlike many organizations that focus their attention solely on Facebook and Twitter, WWE wrestling has diversified.

           The WWE utilizes numerous social media sites such as Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Even with their present following, the WWE is still working on having an even greater online presence. Next up on the WWE’s social media itinerary, matchups based upon social media voter’s preferences. This is the way social media should be done!

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An Olympic-sized collaboration

An Olympic-sized collaboration | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

         This summer’s Olympic games will be featured, as usual, on NBC. However, this year’s games will also be featured on Facebook. Facebook and NBC have teamed up to provide Olympic fans with an all-inclusive experience.

        NBC will be engaging its Facebook fans with trivia, photos, and some exclusive content if fans like their Facebook page. This is a perfect example of spreading news of NBC’s television coverage of the Summer Olympics via a social media site. While NBC will already receive a large viewership due to the Games, they are smart to capitalize on the extra media boost that Facebook can provide for them.

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Where's Pinterest in the Sports PR Equation?

Where's Pinterest in the Sports PR Equation? | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

          Kevin Cain provides some clear examples of how social media use for sports related information has changed over the past two years. Social media has experienced an exponential boom and it is clear that the Olympics will reap the rewards from this increase in usage. While the Vancouver Olympics received some attention, we will clearly see a huge jump in Olympic visibility across the social media platforms this summer.

        Cain mentions Youtube, Facebook, and Twitter as platforms that will be utilized heavily in the next month. I would ask why Pinterest is not included in this article. Pinterest could be a great utility for putting together one’s favorite sports stories. I definitely look forward to seeing the role that Pinterest plays in the 2012 London games.

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87% of People will Partake in Social Media Or Text Friends About The Olympic Games

87% of People will Partake in Social Media Or Text Friends About The Olympic Games | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

          The San Francisco Chronicle stated recently that 87% of people surveyed stated that they plan on using social media or texts to discuss the upcoming Olympics. This shift to online technology should also make sports PR specialists think carefully about the impact that social media has on their profession. While the Olympics are already highly publicized, sports PR professionals must still understand that social media can play in extremely important role in marketing their clients.  The Olympics provide the world’s best athletes with an opportunity to be seen but social media allows them a chance to be heard.  Public relations professionals and the athletes themselves must have a social media plan in place so that they don't miss out on this free publicity. 

          When someone tweets about an athlete, there should be a response.  A rapport should be built between the athlete and their fan base. A healthy percentage of fans said that they would be cheering on their favorites via social media.  One can safely assume that fans are more likely to cheer on athletes that already have a social media relationship with. Fans are an athlete’s best friends, so this an extremely crucial time for the Olympic athletes. The Olympics provide the best athletes with an opportunity to gain sponsors; thus, the more fans an Olympian has, the easier they are to market.

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Sports PR, Social Media, and Navigating a Personal Crisis

Sports PR, Social Media, and Navigating a Personal Crisis | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

          In a technology-savvy world, athletes must be keenly aware of the reputation that they develop for themselves. It is important for athletes to have loyal fans, especially when they encounter a time of crisis. While many athletes develop a Twitter or Facebook page, they fail to recognize the importance of maintaining contact with their fan base.

          When an athlete encounters a crisis, regardless of how trivial it may be, they are put under public scrutiny. While this athlete may encounter a firestorm of information about themselves on Twitter or Facebook, they should be prepared to meet this information head on. Rather than ignoring the Tweets or Facebook feeds, athletes should be ready to post their apology, thank their fans for their support, and then move on. Katrina Younce makes a good point when she says that by the more fans that you engage with on social media platforms, the better you will fare in a major crises. She also advises athletes not to dwell on the problem but to use their social media platforms to redirect the attention to positive aspects of the athlete’s image such as future appearances or charity work.

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Children may be taught to share but Olympians are being taught to be stingy with their social media

Children may be taught to share but Olympians are being taught to be stingy with their social media | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

          This year’s Olympics have been deemed the social media Olympics and the International Olympic Committee is doing its best to keep up with the latest and greatest in social media trends. The IOC has been an advocate for social media use for this year’s Games, however, they’ve made what could be deemed a damaging decision.  While the IOC plans on launching an all-out media blitz, they are telling their athletes to remain tight lipped and tight thumbed about the events at the 2012 London Olympics. Strict rules have been enforced which tell athletes to refrain from posting videos from inside the Olympic Village and dictate the posts that they can make on their social networks. 

           As the article states, athletes rely on their positive relationships with their fans to help them in securing contracts with sponsors.  An athlete’s fan base may suffer if they fail to engage with their fans on these social media platforms. If their fan base is decreased, the athlete’s value to sponsors could decrease exponentially. One of the most valuable aspects of social media is the conversations that athletes are able to hold with their fans; however, it seems as though the IOC fails to recognize this. Personally, I would think that the IOC would want their Olympic ambassadors to interact with, rather than ignore the spectators.

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London 2012- An Introduction to the Power of Social Media

London 2012- An Introduction to the Power of Social Media | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

         Excitement is building as the 2012 London Olympics are quickly approaching. As athletes continue their arduous training and spectators set their DVRs to record, the Olympic games organizers ready themselves for Twitter fallout 2012. Minor hiccups in years past may now turn to major crises as spectators and athletes flock to the Twittersphere to document the latest issues with the 2012 Summer Olympic Games.  Issues such as security, transportation, and long waits may have been small issues in the past; however, minor issues are now easily documented and accessed via social media sites. While a minor glitch may receive more media attention than it once did, the positive aspects of social media usage should not be ignored.

         In his article, Paul Kelso fails to acknowledge the increased positive press that social media networks will surely provide. Twitter provides athletes, coaches, and spectators alike with an outlet for stories related to Olympic trials and triumphs. This year’s use of social media will surely create an engaging online environment. Social media technology will allow everyone, even those at home, to participate in the excitement of the 2012 Olympic Games.

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NASCAR jumps on the social media bandwagon

NASCAR jumps on the social media bandwagon | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

          In NASCAR, there’s no tweeting and driving, but tweeting during a delay, yeah that’s okay. During the Daytona 500, Brad Keselowski put his time to good use by sending out tweets to his fans. His fan base immediately increased and, not only was he not chastised for his tweeting, he was actually praised by NASCAR.

          While other sports are trying to control their athlete’s involvement in social media, NASCAR understands the importance fan engagement. NASCAR’s only condition for tweeting is that it does not endanger any other drivers or fans. Clearly, this example of tweeting did neither so it was readily accepted as a creative idea for fan engagement. I’m sure many fans were already frustrated by the delay, so it is quite possible that Keselowski actually did NASCAR a favor by keeping the fans engaged during a frustrating time. It seems as though NASCAR will be giving the green light to Keselowski and other media savvy drivers when it comes to future social media use.

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Soccer gets a helping hand from social media

Soccer gets a helping hand from social media | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

          Soccer is huge on social media sites, but until I read this blog I never actually realized why. I already understand the huge allure of soccer worldwide; however, I had failed to realize significant lack of coverage of the sport in the United States. Elsewhere, soccer games are a huge event, but soccer has only recently become a phenomenon within the United States.

          I do agree with the author, in that, there appears to be a correlation between the growth of social media and the growth of soccer in North America. Soccer doesn’t receive much publicity via the common outlets, so it would make sense that soccer fans find much of their information online. Social media provides these fans with a connection to their favorite athletes and teams; though, it may provide an even more important function by keeping the fans up-to-date on all soccer-related information.

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Twitter - Scandalous possibilities

Twitter - Scandalous possibilities | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

         Is Twitter dangerous to Olympic athletes? The answer could be a resounding “yes.” While Twitter can be used to successfully brand Olympic athletes, it may also cause some unwanted attention. With all of the posts that will be sent out over the next few weeks, there is a chance that at least one of them could be damaging to an athlete’s online brand.

          Olympians are not without their flaws; however, they should be careful about the pictures and posts that they post on their social media platforms. Without careful consideration, the athletes may post an inflammatory post that could cause irreparable damage to their career. Hopefully, these athletes will exercise a high degree of caution that must be taken when posting to their accounts during this crucial time in their professional lives.

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WWE: Touting a large following

WWE: Touting a large following | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

          Is Tout the next big social media thing? WWE recently partnered with Tout and the social media platform has seen a significant increase in usage since that time. In terms of downloads, more than 30,000 copies of the app have been downloaded since July 16th. The social media application allows users to share 15 second videos and also watch videos posted by others.

          WWE is well known for their large and devoted fan base. This fan base has allowed the WWE to receive more than 100 million follows across different social media accounts. If their current following gives any inclination as to their social media power, Tout is a surefire hit with social media adopters.

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Twitter as a distraction from Olympic level competition

Twitter as a distraction from Olympic level competition | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

Twitter is a distraction from Olympic level competition? Sure it is! Sebastian Coe, a former Olympic champion, recently stated that Twitter and other social media sites can distract Olympic caliber athletes during competition. I’m sure this is the case.

Yes, Twitter and other social media sites are excellent ways to stay connected to fans. Are they conducive to Olympic level training and competition? No, probably not. We’re not saying that you need to tweet during your practice, but keeping followers up-to-date shouldn’t harm your skill set. I’m sorry, but if you really think Twitter is to blame for poor performances, I would also advise these competitors to stay away from shiny objects. Next, we’ll be hearing about how mirrors harm a competitor’s performance.

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Airtel, soaring past the rest

Airtel, soaring past the rest | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

Airtel Formula1, the destination Facebook page for Formula1 enthusiasts is gearing up the engagement for 2012 Airtel India Grand Prix.

 

As all of us become consumed by the upcoming Olympics, we oftentimes forget that there are several sports that are not showcased in the event. While many athletes are receiving free press from their participation in the London Games, others are still working diligently to garner social media attention for their brand.

Airtel Formula1 racing is striving to develop a strong social media presence and, by all accounts, they are doing an excellent job. The racing team has recently stepped up their social media presence by utilizing tactics such as contests, developing questions for their fans to answer, and by simply posting pictures that allow their fans a peek inside the racing world. Over the past few months, Airtel has experienced a huge growth in their social media presence due to their tactics. My one complaint about Airtel’s campaign is that they have failed to capitalize on Twitter use. Twitter is an excellent social media platform, so why wouldn’t a person or organization take advantage of it?

 

 

 

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A PR Goldmine for the IOC

A PR Goldmine for the IOC | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

        The International Olympic Committee has jumped on the social media bandwagon. This year’s Olympics are expected to be the characterized by the strong use of social media and the IOC is making sure that they’re prepared for all of the social media activity. Understanding the importance of this marketing trend, the Committee has now developed a social media hub for all of the Olympic fans.

       The committee has signed up thousands of athletes for this service and they have developed a one-stop destination for all things social media related. Rather than looking at all of the athletes’ social media profiles, fans can now simply go the IOC’s social media hub and access all of the athletes’ accounts simultaneously. Way to go IOC, I’m glad you’ve made at least one good decision. Now, if you would only let your athletes speak freely.

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Alex Marchese's curator insight, September 27, 2013 12:35 PM

Chose this one because it was interesting how they made a hub for all fans to interact and talk about the olympics. Just shows how social media really is changing the pr world!

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Blues Take the Gold in Social Media Playoffs

Blues Take the Gold in Social Media Playoffs | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

         Watch out St. Louis, the Blues are ready to mingle.  While Major League Baseball may hold all of the social media rights to its clubs, the National Hockey League holds no such agreement. This, the control over their own social media destiny, has allowed the St. Louis Blues organization to develop a strong rapport with their social media followers. As the Blues made their playoff attempt this past season, they were greeted with thousands of tweets and follows by their excited fans.

           The Blues are a perfect example of how traditional sports PR publicists are making the shift to a more relevant media. The Blues were receiving attention from traditional press, however, the tweets that the Blues organization utilized provided an opportunity for them to reach an even wider fan base. The Blues engage their fans with games, trivia, and also with conversations from the players. This type of communication allowed Blues fans a chance to feel connected even if they were unable to attend the expensive games. Way to go Blues, you may have not won the cup but you won the gold in social media PR.

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Olympic Gymnasts Take to the Twittersphere

Olympic Gymnasts Take to the Twittersphere | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

      After last month’s gymnastics Olympic trials, several gymnasts took to Twitter as words of support and encouragement flooded their Twitter feeds. While many gymnasts were not active Twitter followers, they say that they will become more active now that they realize the important connection it maintains with their fans. While some Olympic hopefuls, like Rebecca Bross, did not make the team they have been inspired by the outpouring of support and encouragement from their dedicated fans.

       Perhaps, it has now become clear to the Olympic athletes that in order to bond with their fans they must connect with them on their level. From what I have seen thus far, the female gymnasts are diligently checking and responding to their Twitter posts. The 2012 Olympic gymnastics team has paid attention to their fans and keeping them abreast of their progress as they attempt a run for this year’s gold.

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An Olympic Ordeal: Twitter versus Transportation

An Olympic Ordeal: Twitter versus Transportation | Sports Public Relations via Social Media | Scoop.it

          As athletes began to arrive in London for the 2012 Olympic Games, they were greeted by fans, VIP treatment, and an unnecessarily long bus ride to the Olympic Village. Officials told members of the press that they gladly welcomed numbers of Olympic athletes into their country yesterday via Heathrow International Airport. While it should have been a day of anticipation and excitement, several athletes were stranded on a bus for several hours.  Officials claimed that the first day of arrivals had went well, but athletes begged to differ. This is yet another example of how Twitter can impact the perception of this year’s games. One would expect that London would be prepared to take the world’s greatest athletes on a tour of the city, however, I don’t think that a four hour bus ride was what they had in mind.

          During this crucial time, officials must be careful to put their best foot forward. While Beijing did receive some social media attention, London should expect that their city will be under a great deal of scrutiny. I would, however, provide athletes with a word of caution. While your audience does want to know about your training and your upcoming Olympic events, they do not want to hear you whining. Athletes, much like London, must keep in mind that many of this year’s spectators will be following social media’s coverage of the Olympic events. If athletes want to keep their fans, they must also be aware of the online image that they are creating for themselves.

 

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