Spontaneous, Networked Organization
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Spontaneous, Networked Organization
Multi-agent Systems, virtual organization, virtual team, social network, planning
Curated by Saad Alqithami
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COOS/HOME

COOS/HOME | Spontaneous, Networked Organization | Scoop.it
Saad Alqithami's insight:

> Call for Papers

 

Collaborative Online Organizations (COOS) workshop 2013

 

        May 6-7, 2013 | Saint Paul, MN, USA

        In conjunction with AAMAS 2013

        http://www2.cs.siu.edu/~mas

 

This workshop aims to bring together experts from scientists, researchers and engineers interested in the theory and practice of computational models of online, networked organizations. The objective is to advance understanding and crafting of online and virtual organizations. Substantial amount of research work is ongoing in distributed knowledge management. This workshop intends to emphasize the operational elements of social networks that facilitate elements of online organization. Papers describing advanced prototypes, systems, tools and techniques and position papers indicating future directions are also encouraged. Papers describing original work are invited in any of the areas listed below. Accepted papers must be presented at the workshop by one of the authors, and it will appear in the proceedings of AAMAS 2013 workshop. Acceptance will be based on quality, relevance and originality. Both full research reports and work-in-progress reports are welcome. High quality papers will be selected for extension and made ready for inclusion in a special issue of the “Journal of Advanced Computational Intelligence and Intelligent Informatics”.

 

> IMPORTANT DATES

         *  Extended deadline for submission: February 22, 2013

         *  Notification to authors: March 8, 2013

         *  Workshop: May 6, 2013

 

> WORKSHOP AREAS

The following is a partial list of areas of interest. Papers may address one or more of the listed sub-topics, although authors should not feel limited by them. Unlisted but related sub-topics are also acceptable, provided should fit in one of the following main topic areas:

 

. Cooperation and collaboration mechanisms

. Collaborative architectures and mechanisms

. Theoretical aspects of distributed collaboration

. Human-centric based group collaboration

. Agent-based collaborative environments

. Social networks and community discovery

. Computational Models of Organizations

. Networked Organizations

. Collaborative infrastructures

. Collaborative services

. Virtual Organizations

. Collaborative Filtering

. Networked Organizations

. Collective intelligence

. Crowdsourcing

. Network-centric warfare

. Networked individualism

. Computational Models of Organizations

. Human/robot collaboration

. Collaborative social networks and web-based collaboration

. Computer supported collaborative work with distributed systems

. Distributed technologies for group collaboration

. Collaborative games

. Social computing and inter-cultural collaboration

. Globalized networks

. Digital Communities

. Grid Alliances

 

Authors are required to submit their papers electronically, in .docx, .dox, .pdf format, and follow the submission guidelines, available at the workshop website. The submission system is accessible through the following link: https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=coos2013.

 

> ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

Saad Alqithami, Henry Hexmoor, Frank Dignum, Barbara Carminati, and Eric Matson

 

 

> For more related topics and details, please visit à www.cs.siu.edu/~mas

 

 

Regards,

Collaborative Online Organizations workshop 2013

http://www2.cs.siu.edu/~mas | 

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Social ‘circuits’ shared by frogs, fish, and humans

Social ‘circuits’ shared by frogs, fish, and humans | Spontaneous, Networked Organization | Scoop.it

“There is an ancient circuitry that appears to be involved in social behavior across all vertebrates,” says Hans Hofmann, associate professor of integrative biology at the University of Texas at Austin. “On a basic level, this tells us something about where we came from. A lot of the neural circuits that our brain uses for social behavior are actually quite old.”

 

As reported in Science, Hofmann and graduate student Lauren O’Connell analyzed 12 regions of the brain responsible for social behavior and decision-making in 88 species of vertebrates including birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and fish.


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Why do beliefs about intelligence influence learning success? A social cognitive neuroscience model

Students’ beliefs and goals can powerfully influence their learning success. Those who believe intelligence is a fixed entity (entity theorists) tend to emphasize ‘performance goals,’ leaving them vulnerable to negative feedback and likely to disengage from challenging learning opportunities. In contrast, students who believe intelligence is malleable (incremental theorists) tend to emphasize ‘learning goals’ and rebound better from occasional failures. Guided by cognitive neuroscience models of top–down, goal-directed behavior, we use event-related potentials (ERPs) to understand how these beliefs influence attention to information associated with successful error correction. Focusing on waveforms associated with conflict detection and error correction in a test of general knowledge, we found evidence indicating that entity theorists oriented differently toward negative performance feedback, as indicated by an enhanced anterior frontal P3 that was also positively correlated with concerns about proving ability relative to others. Yet, following negative feedback, entity theorists demonstrated less sustained memory-related activity (left temporal negativity) to corrective information, suggesting reduced effortful conceptual encoding of this material–a strategic approach that may have contributed to their reduced error correction on a subsequent surprise retest. These results suggest that beliefs can influence learning success through top–down biasing of attention and conceptual processing toward goal-congruent information.


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Graph Theory and Complex Networks : Free e-Book

Graph Theory and Complex Networks : Free e-Book | Spontaneous, Networked Organization | Scoop.it

GTCN aims to explain the basics of graph theory that are needed at an introductory level for students in computer or information sciences. To motivate students and to show that even these basic notions can be extremely useful, the book also aims to provide an introduction to the modern field of network science.

I take the starting-point that mathematics for most students is unnecessarily intimidating. Explicit attention is paid in the first chapters to mathematical notations and proof techniques, emphasizing that the notations form the biggest obstacle, not the mathematical concepts themselves. Taking this approach has allowed me to gradually prepare students for using tools that are necessary to put graph theory to work: complex networks.


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STSM WG3 (Sergio Esparcia García) « COST Action IC0801

STSM WG3 (Sergio Esparcia García) « COST Action IC0801 | Spontaneous, Networked Organization | Scoop.it
This visit will be focused on Organization-Centered Multi-Agent Systems (OCMAS), the main research topic of both, guest and host of this STSM. Then, this action is associated to the WG3 Organisations of this COST Action.
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5 Tips for Virtual Collaboration - Forbes

5 Tips for Virtual Collaboration - Forbes | Spontaneous, Networked Organization | Scoop.it
Virtual collaboration comes with its own unique challenges -- especially for leaders whose previous experience has been mainly with collocated teams.
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Disaster Recovery And Planning

Disaster Recovery And Planning http://t.co/6kCNZMUL...
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The limitations of social discovery

The limitations of social discovery | Spontaneous, Networked Organization | Scoop.it

“Discovery” is a hot topic these days. The curse of a new buzzword is that it’s difficult to come to a shared mental model in the early stages. Instead of tackling that large problem, I’ll start with something simpler: defining “social discovery” and suggest that social discovery is a stepping stone on the way to algorithmic discovery.

“Social discovery” has two definitions. On one hand, it’s used to mean services like Highlight that help you to find other people. However, the broader definition is services that help you find just about anything by using recommendations from friends.


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Complex Microbe Communication, Quorum Sensing Behavior, Spreading Resistance, Altruism and More

Complex Microbe Communication, Quorum Sensing Behavior, Spreading Resistance, Altruism and More | Spontaneous, Networked Organization | Scoop.it

A previous post shows microbes communicating well enough to form structures and function as a multicellular creature. Many microbes demonstrate an elaborate languageof signals which elicit a wide range of other behaviors.Messages between microbes often take the form of secreted chemicals.

 

One chemical message tells others that there is not much food in a particular location; those who “hear” it go in other directions.

Individual microbes send out signals that communicate their presence, and when a certain number have signaled they launch various group activities. This is called “quorum sensing.” For example, some colonies of bacteria light up when enough bacteria are present. Similarly, they defend each other from antibiotics, grow food together, and eat each other’s waste.


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A search engine for social networks based on the behavior of ants

A search engine for social networks based on the behavior of ants | Spontaneous, Networked Organization | Scoop.it

Research at Carlos III University in Madrid is developing an algorithm, based on ants' behavior when they are searching for food, which accelerates the search for relationships among elements that are present in social networks.

 

One of the main technical questions in the field of social networks, whose use is becoming more and more generalized, consists in locating the chain of reference that leads from one person to another, from one node to another. The greatest challenges that are presented in this area is the enormous size of these networks and the fact that the response must be rapid, given that the final user expects results in the shortest time possible. In order to find a solution to this problem, these researchers from UC3M have developed an algorithm SoSACO, which accelerates the search for routes between two nodes that belong to a graph that represents a social network.

 

The way SoSACO works was inspired by behavior that has been perfected over thousands of years by one of the most disciplined insects on the planet when they search for food. In general, the algorithms used by colonies of ants imitate how they are capable of finding the path between the anthill and the source of food by secreting and following a chemical trail, called a pheromone, which is deposited on the ground. "In this study – the authors explain – other scented trails are also included so that the ants can follow both the pheromone as well as the scent of the food, which allows them to find the food source much more quickly". The main results of this research, which was carried out by Jessica Rivero in UC3M's Laboratorio de Bases de Datos Avanzadas (The Advanced Data Bases Laboratory - LABDA) as part of her doctoral thesis, are summarized in a scientific article published in the journal Applied Intelligence. "The early results show that the application of this algorithm to real social networks obtains an optimal response in a very short time (tens of milliseconds)", Jessica Rivero states.


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VOMI Virtual Organization Academy

VOMI Virtual Organization Academy | Spontaneous, Networked Organization | Scoop.it
VOMI Virtual Organization Academy is the world's leading and only virtual organization sabbatical destination for corporate executives, public policy executives, government officials and employees, technology researchers, academic researchers and...
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