Sponsored Research & Programs
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Sponsored Research & Programs
News, trends and tips for faculty, administrators and staff involved with sponsored research and programs at Providence College
Curated by Kris Monahan
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Grant Forward Search Engine | Search for federal grants, foundation grants, and limited submission opportunities

Grant Forward Search Engine | Search for federal grants, foundation grants, and limited submission opportunities | Sponsored Research & Programs | Scoop.it
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Start your profile and look for funding using PC's subscription!

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2013 Policies and Procedures for Sponsored Research & Programs

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This is your one stop for Sponsored Research & Programs Policies and Procedures. Still can't find what you are looking for? Just call Kris Monahan at X2554 or Charlie Ouellette for financial matters X 2925 .

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Bridging the Gap Between Undergraduate Education and Research - PLoS Blogs (blog)

Bridging the Gap Between Undergraduate Education and Research - PLoS Blogs (blog) | Sponsored Research & Programs | Scoop.it
PLoS Blogs (blog) Bridging the Gap Between Undergraduate Education and Research PLoS Blogs (blog) Fundamentally, for undergraduate research to be a sustainable science workforce development strategy, curriculum and culture must function to foster...
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U.S. Lawmaker Proposes New Criteria for Choosing NSF Grants

U.S. Lawmaker Proposes New Criteria for Choosing NSF Grants | Sponsored Research & Programs | Scoop.it

The new chair of the House of Representatives science committee has drafted a bill that, in effect, would replace peer review at the National Science Foundation (NSF) with a set of funding criteria chosen by Congress. For good measure, it would also set in motion a process to determine whether the same criteria should be adopted by every other federal science agency.


Via PIRatE Lab
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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, May 1, 2013 2:01 PM

This is the latest in a distrubing, anti-science, anti-fact based agenda of a large number of our elected representatives.  While far from perfect, peer review is the best thing we have going.  To even discuss eliminating this is to signal one does not understand how science works or, indeed, what "science" actually means.

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NIH RePORTER - NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools Expenditures and Results

NIH RePORTER - NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools Expenditures and Results | Sponsored Research & Programs | Scoop.it
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Interested in knowing what types of projects NIH has funded? Use the NIH funding database to explore by research topic, grant mechanism, type of school, specific grant program and more....

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Open Access To Research: An Ideal Complicated By Reality | Forbes

Open Access To Research: An Ideal Complicated By Reality | Forbes | Sponsored Research & Programs | Scoop.it

Next month a new Obama-administration policy will give the public greater access to research funded by the federal government.  This is good news for the scientific community as well as the general public—but not all university-based research is covered by the new policy, and some of it presents far more complex transparency issues.

 

Announced last February, the memo from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy requires federal agencies that spend over $100 million annually supporting research and development to make the results of that (non-classified) research, as well as the underlying data, available to the public within a year of publication. The one-year period allows publishers of scientific journals time to retain their rights and make money.

 

As researchers around the world gain faster and more complete access to the work of their colleagues, the pace of scientific progress will increase and so will the benefits to society in areas like the economy, healthcare, and energy. It’s also clear to us that taxpayers, scientists or not, deserve access to the information their support has generated.

 

Research universities applaud the new policy and are actively involved in devising ways to comply. A group of academic organizations (the Association of American Universities, the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities, and the Association of Research Libraries) has proposed a system in which “universities will collaborate with the federal government and others to host cross-institutional digital repositories” of research publications.

 

Such a system would add to the ways many researchers already share their data. The Internet e-Print Archive, known as arXiv, was created by Cornell professor Paul Ginsparg more than twenty years ago to enable physicists to share research results even before publication. Today, with at least half a million articles, arXiv is an essential source of free information for physicists, mathematicians, computer scientists, and others—including many in developing countries who have limited access to expensive journals.

 

But the research covered by the new policy is not the only kind that is conducted at universities. Other kinds—primarily government-funded classified research and some industry-sponsored research—do not always appear in scientific publications and are sometimes at odds with the ideal of transparency and open communication of knowledge, an ideal that runs deep in the traditions of academic communities. That ideal, and the fear of political interference, are among the reasons that many universities, including Cornell, decline federal grants for classified research.

 

Industry contracts are another matter. Faced with budgetary pressures and constrained federal support, universities and their faculty increasingly rely on industry funding for some research projects. But industries’ proprietary interests in commercializing research results with a patent or new product often promote a degree of secrecy. There are ways to mitigate this concern, but it is real and can run counter to the academic ethos and the public good.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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