Spiritual Sustenance
847 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

Unusual Asteroid Could Be An Interstellar Guest To Our Solar System

Unusual Asteroid Could Be An Interstellar Guest To Our Solar System | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
The supposed "interstellar immigrant" is located near Jupiter but has an atypical orbit.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

Gandhi's methods gave India dignity and purpose, says Ramachandra Guha —

Gandhi's methods gave India dignity and purpose, says Ramachandra Guha — | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
That, amidst the wreckage of Partition, there were some capable men and women at hand to build a nation anew was largely the handiwork of Gandhi.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

The Places Where Church & Culture Collide—A Look into New Churches, Stories, and the Many Forms of Gospel Witness

The Places Where Church & Culture Collide—A Look into New Churches, Stories, and the Many Forms of Gospel Witness | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
We should plant churches that plant churches, but also help these communities blossom into a life-giving presence in and for their cities....
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

Are your 20s really the best time of your life?

Are your 20s really the best time of your life? | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
A study on wellbeing finds 20-somethings feel more distant from friends and family.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

How to feel less lonely: Learn to cultivate wisdom —

How to feel less lonely: Learn to cultivate wisdom — | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
Loneliness is a poison to the body and soul, toxic to a happy life. But it can be neutralized and conquered by a powerful antidote we all can possess: Wisdom.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

25 Children's Books That Celebrate Differences

25 Children's Books That Celebrate Differences | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
From race to religion to abilities and more.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

If You Want To Achieve Extreme Productivity, Don't Be A Goldfish

If You Want To Achieve Extreme Productivity, Don't Be A Goldfish | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
People often ask me how I manage to get so much done in a given day. My answer is always the same: Don't be a goldfish.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

Why Your Definition of Success Is Broken And Keeping You From Success

Why Your Definition of Success Is Broken And Keeping You From Success | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
We’ve all been told and conditioned to believe that success is whatever you define it to be. The great untold truth is that this is a misguided directive that has prevented a huge percentage of the population from achieving sustainable success. In my coaching practice, I regularly ask my new clients what their definition of success is. The most common response is a big pause and then an impromptu answer. The second most common response is a nebulous, non-specific one. For example: Coach: “Can you please tell me what your definition of success is?” Client: “Happiness” Coach: “What does happiness mean to you?” Client: “Feeling fulfilled” Coach: “What fulfills you?” Client: “Having a lot of money?” I think you get the unclear picture presented. There is one hardcore fact about achieving success that I’ve learned. If you can’t clearly and specifically define it, you’re either going to: 1. Not achieve it. 2. Take the long, slow road to get there. 3. Not be able to sustain it if you, by chance, achieve some. I remember as a young entrepreneur starting out, I was determined to become “successful,” and I thought I’d better be clear on society’s definition of success. I consulted the go-to resource for the answer. I grabbed my Merriam-Webster dictionary, and this is what it said: "a: degree or measure of succeeding b: favorable or desired outcome; also: the attainment of wealth, favor, or eminence" Upon reading the definition, I felt disheartened and confused. How could success be caught up in fame, respect or money? It just didn’t feel right. So, I kept researching. I then came across a famous success expert’s definition. In his book Born to Win!, Zig Ziglar says that success cannot be defined in one sentence, but instead it is comprised of many things. Now I was really confused. For the life of me, I couldn’t understand why there wasn’t a clear, specific and universal definition of success that was one-size-fits-all. Why was there so much lack of clarity on the meaning of success? In my personal journey of overcoming life-threatening health challenges, financial adversity and spiritual tests -- and then becoming a self-made multimillionaire, medaled amateur athlete and coach to people from all walks of life, from main street to Wall Street, gang members, cons and ex-cons -- I discovered the true and singular definition of success, the one that is indeed the one-size-fits-all definition. It’s the one definition that, if used collectively by society, would help us achieve success more rapidly and sustainably. So, here it goes: Success is defined as a balanced achievement of wealth and well-being through consistently living the truth of ones’ grace-inspired values. A broken definition of success is one that does not take a holistic approach. It leaves out some aspect of the whole person. The whole person is: 1. Physical 2. Mental 3. Spiritual 4. Financial 5. Emotional Does fame provide nourishment to the whole person? Does accomplishing one singular goal? Does wealth cover all aspects? No. Only a balanced achievement of wealth and well-being can do that. And, one can only accomplish that balance through consistently living the truth of their values. If not, the “success” is at risk of failing. I could go into a multitude of real-life stories of people who achieved some aspect of success and then lost it because they either compromised their values or, through not knowing their core values, failed to prioritize living them out in all their decision making. How do you start to clearly and specifically define what wealth, well-being and your values are? First, ask yourself these two essential questions: 1. What is the most important thing in the world to you? 2. Why is it the most important thing to you? Answering these two questions will start you on the path to clearly understand what innate forces drive you so that you can craft a picture of what a balanced achievement of wealth and well-being looks like -- one that supports your core needs and provides you with fulfilling and sustainable success. After decades of success coaching and working with both individuals and corporations, I’ve discovered that every single goal anyone goes after is an attempt to fulfill only one of two things: security or recognition. When defining success and goal-setting, take your whole person into account, know your core values, understand what’s important to you and understand that you’re always either seeking security or recognition. Make sure that all you seek is grounded in humility rather than ego to ensure you’ll achieve sustainable “success,” as defined as a balanced achievement of wealth and well-being. Forbes Coaches Council is an invitation-only community for leading business and career coaches. Do I qualify?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

Stop Searching For Contentment: The Value Of An Unsettled Mind

Stop Searching For Contentment: The Value Of An Unsettled Mind | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
A sense of discontentment is the very thing that drives human initiative and innovation. It’s the thing that says, the world is imperfect and we must get up off our asses and do something about it. In other words, the restive feelings we all have are inherently good things.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

Dealing Well With Setbacks Is Just as Important as Taking Advantage of Opportunities

Dealing Well With Setbacks Is Just as Important as Taking Advantage of Opportunities | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
You can never lose everything because you are much more than your material possessions.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

How To Talk About Your Mental Health When No One Wants To Listen

How To Talk About Your Mental Health When No One Wants To Listen | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
Because you deserve to be heard.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

Use of Social Media in Healthcare Has Transformed Industry

Use of Social Media in Healthcare Has Transformed Industry | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
Learn about Profiler, or the other tools within Synthesio’s Social Intelligence Suite, and how they can measure the use of social media in healthcare.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

Friday essay: what might heaven be like?

Notions of heaven have changed through the ages, from an eternity centred on God to a more secular place where loved ones will reunite.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

What to Cook This Weekend - The New York Times

What to Cook This Weekend - The New York Times | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
Good morning. For a lot of us this will be a big weekend for cooking, what with Passover getting underway tonight, and Easter following on Sunday. So good luck with your legs of lamb, your big smoked hams, your brisket and matzo brei. Here’s hoping your hard-boiled eggs are perfect, your haroseth truffles beautiful, your lemon sweet rolls with cream-cheese icing sun-kissed and soft. We are here for all who need us at NYT Cooking, and offer recipes appropriate to whatever faith you have, including none, as some among us celebrate the rise and promise of spring. But you don’t need cook out of the paschal playbook, if you don’t want to. Samin Nosrat, for instance, has a new recipe I think you’ll want to try, based partly on Hawaiian butter mochi, but also on her experience making canelés, those wee little caramelized pastries from Bordeaux with a gooey center. Samin calls her sweets brown-butter mochi cakes (above), and wrote about the process of discovering them in The Times this week. Brown-butter mochi cakes prove to be the best kind of recipe, the sort that leaves you wondering how something so complex and delicious turns out to be so simple to make. And Sunday isn’t just Easter, remember. It’s also April Fools’ Day, and the best day of the year to make and serve and yap about Rozanne Gold’s insane and actually delicious recipe for a cherry cola-chocolate-mayonnaise-sauerkraut cake. (Read the notes that follow the recipe! People dig this one!) If I weren’t smoking lamb on Sunday and making like the Canlis brothers with their Lake Union salad, I might have turned toward shrimp burgers for dinner — maybe you could in my place. Or maybe Korean grilled beef lettuce wraps? Or a Russian salmon pie! Thousands of recipes to consider cooking this weekend are anyway at NYT Cooking. Go browse among them, the way people did in the age of malls. You’ll need to sign up for a subscription to do so, yes. But I think you’ll find that worth your while. We’ll be standing by to help if anything goes wrong along the way, either with your cooking or with the technology we use to support our activities. Just reach out to cookingcare@nytimes.com. And we will get back to you. Continue reading the main story
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

The maligning of early Christianity

The maligning of early Christianity | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
Official site of The Week Magazine, offering commentary and analysis of the day's breaking news and current events as well as arts, entertainment, people and gossip, and political cartoons.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

Belief Is Your Next Wicked Leadership Problem. Here's How To Solve It.

Belief Is Your Next Wicked Leadership Problem. Here's How To Solve It. | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
For any vision of change to succeed, people have to embrace it as their own. But they won’t do either unless they believe in you and your vision.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

How You Can Achieve Big Results From Tiny Improvements According To Science

How You Can Achieve Big Results From Tiny Improvements According To Science | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
How many times did you start out optimistic, but then lost hope because you did not see the results? Learn a technique where 1% improvement leads to significant results. It is mathematically proven and was used to win multiple Olympic Gold Medals.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

Foods For The Body, Mind And Soul

Foods For The Body, Mind And Soul | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
(Credit: Kati Holland) Pearl Butters are packaged with cheeky messages about self-empowerment and healing: “Smart is the new everything,” the webpage for the “Smarty Pantsuit” butter infused with spirulina and ginko proclaims. “Finally, a detox that doesn’t suck,” boasts the page on a spread formulated with activated charcoal and milk thistle. Riding a wave of foods trends for 2018, the line of adaptogenic coconut butters fall into a nebulous area around efficacy. The products have not undergone clinical trials, but they do boast ingredients, collectively known as “adaptogens,” that are shown to help the body adapt to—and resist—physical, chemical and environmental stress. Plants and herbs ranging from ashwagandha to turmeric are infused into a base of organic coconut butter that can be scooped into smoothies, spread on toast or eaten by the spoonful. I spoke with CEO and founder Kati Holland about the evolution of the 2-year-old company, her anti-Goop focus on science and her philosophy around self-care and community. What is Pearl Butter? Pearl Butter is a female-centric wellness company on a mission to make wellness more accessible and fun! Each butter has its own function. For instance, Beauty Butter is pink and is formulated with collagen-boosting ingredients, like pitaya, shavegrass and pearl. And, beyond being functional, we try to make every butter lighthearted and “grammable”—something our customers are excited to share—because we're totally over the stuffiness of the wellness industry. (Credit: Pearl Butter) This idea was born out of challenge: a hormonal birth control you took for acne ended up compromising your lymphatic system, and you were in and out of the Mayo Clinic for a year after that. How did that time transform your understanding of health and healing? I didn’t care at all about my health before getting sick. When you’re 18, you worry about report cards and whether or not that cute guy in your math class is going to call you back. You don’t worry about the burning sensation that you know is about to take over your body after the doctors inject dye in between your toes, or whether or not you’ll ever be able to wear shoes again. Yes, my feet got so big I couldn’t wear normal shoes. It was the lowest point of my life. But I came to see that getting sick was the biggest blessing in disguise because it taught me perspective. My “Year of Hell” was also my entry point into Eastern medicine and my growing belief that—as cheesy as it sounds—health is the ultimate wealth, and healing goes far beyond pills and surgeries. That experience led to your interest in adaptogens … Yes. Adaptogens are herbs that have been used for centuries in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine to help bring the body back to homeostasis. I’m going to be honest, when I first heard about them from an herbalist—at a time when I was desperate to try anything—I expected them to be bullshit. However, they really do work.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

The Dangers Of Dishonesty

The Dangers Of Dishonesty | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
“You can’t handle the truth!” So said Jack Nicholson as Col. Nathan Jessup in Aaron Sorkin’s A Few Good Men. He thus offered one of the many justifications leaders often give for lying. This is sometimes also called the Santa Claus defense: It’s OK to tell children that Santa is real because it has a very positive outcome, and kids are not sophisticated enough to appreciate the truth. The idea that some lies are OK recently became the subject of public discussion when former White House Communications Director Hope Hicks, in a closed hearing of the House Intelligence Committee, was asked whether she lied for the President. According to news accounts, she conferred with her lawyers and then admitted she had told “white lies” – inconsequential lies – for the president. Of course, one of the dangers of justifying dishonesty by saying the lies are inconsequential is that people then question whether those lies really are inconsequential. Is that statement itself further dishonesty? Like with cockroaches, when we see one, we may assume that there are many others around too. For 30 years, I have taught ethics in graduate business and communication programs and in schools run by the U.S. military. And one of the stickiest problems leaders in business and other disciplines face is handling the truth and its opposite. How much should leaders share with their teams? Do leaders need to tell all they know? Is withholding the truth the same as a lie? Leaders can, in good faith, grapple with these questions while avoiding dishonesty. What Is A Lie? Dishonesty is toxic. And there are many forms of dishonesty. For example, for publicly traded corporations, failure to disclose a material fact that a reasonable investor would consider important in making an investment decision can be a violation of the securities laws.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

Teaching High School Journalism In The 'Fake News' Era

Teaching High School Journalism In The 'Fake News' Era | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
I want my students to keep the faith, but it's not always easy.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

The vast emptiness that only religion can fill

The vast emptiness that only religion can fill | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
Official site of The Week Magazine, offering commentary and analysis of the day's breaking news and current events as well as arts, entertainment, people and gossip, and political cartoons.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

Compliance Vs. Self-Governance: A Brief History Of Two Governance Paradigms

Compliance Vs. Self-Governance: A Brief History Of Two Governance Paradigms | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
Did Thomas Hobbes invent compliance management? Is Aristotle the father of ethics management? Two antipodal governance paradigms run through the history of ideas.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

Cynicism isn't as smart as we think it is —

Cynicism isn't as smart as we think it is — | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
In the fourth century BC, cynics wanted to live like dogs. The Cynics were Greek philosophers who rejected conventional ideas about money, power, and shelter. Instead, they advocated living simply, aligned with nature.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

The Secrets to Living a Longer, Happier and More Productive Life

The Secrets to Living a Longer, Happier and More Productive Life | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
Never worry. If you're worrying, you're not working.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Charles Morris
Scoop.it!

Coping with the Loss of a Grandchild

Coping with the Loss of a Grandchild | Spiritual Sustenance | Scoop.it
Grieving the death of a loved one is quite possibly the most difficult experience we can endure. The feelings of disbelief, helplessness and sorrow that often accompany grief are a natural and normal response to the death of someone we love. While the death of anyone you are close to will be difficult, for grandparents coping with the loss of a grandchild, navigating the dark and unique road of grief may be decidedly more complex. Grandparents who are grieving the death of a grandchild are often “neglected mourners,” taking a back seat to the primary mourners – the parents and siblings of the child who died. When it comes to offering empathy and support, grandparents are often forgotten or are too focused on “staying strong” for their loved ones to process their own feelings. A Grandparent’s Grief is Unique According to Dr. Alan Wolfelt, renowned author, educator and grief counselor, when a grandparent experiences the death of a grandchild, they are faced with a unique grieving process, mourning the death on many levels. Wolfelt explains, “when a grandchild dies, grandparents grieve twice. They mourn the loss of the child, and they feel the pain of their own child’s suffering.” Grandparents are in the extraordinary position of playing two roles: that of mourner and protector. Dr. Wolfelt continues, “a parent’s love for a child is perhaps the strongest of all human bonds. For the parents of the child who died, the pain of grief may seem intolerable. For the grandparents, watching their own child suffer so and feeling powerless to take away the hurt can feel almost as intolerable.” Grandparents who live at a distance and did not have close or frequent contact with their grandchild might also experience additional feelings of guilt and regret, or mourn the loss of a relationship they never had the opportunity to embrace. The Search for Meaning For people coping with the death of a loved one, the search to find meaning in such a tragedy is a normal and necessary part of the grieving process. This is no different for grandparents who have lost a grandchild. Dr. Wolfelt explains that grandparents – many of whom have already lived long, rich lives – may struggle with feelings of guilt. It is not uncommon for grandparents to consider questions such as “why couldn’t it have been me, instead?” or “how could God let this happen?” Searching for meaning in the death of a grandchild may naturally lead to more fundamental considerations, including: How you will carry on living with this devastating loss in your life The meaning and purpose of life Your philosophy on life Your religious and spiritual values Talking to a trusted friend or professional – perhaps someone outside of the family unit – will allow you to express your feelings and help to relieve the heavy burden weighing on your heart. How to Support Someone Who is Coping with the Loss of a Grandchild Dr. Wolflet suggests considering the following tips when supporting a grandparent who has lost a grandchild: Avoid cliché’s: Words, particularly clichés, can be extremely painful for a grieving grandparent because they diminish the very real and very painful loss of a unique child. Be aware of holidays and other significant days: Visit the grandparent, write a note or simply give them a quick phone call during these times. Your ongoing support will be appreciated and healing. Be compassionate: Give the grandparent permission to express their feelings without fear of criticism. Don’t instruct, or set expectations about how they should respond. Never say, “I know how you feel.” You don’t. Listen with your heart: Listen attentively and try to understand. Don’t worry so much about what you will say, rather concentrate on the words that are being shared with you. Offer practical help: Preparing food and washing clothes are just a few of the practical ways of showing you care. Whether you are coping with the loss of a grandchild or supporting someone who is, always be kind and don’t assume unrealistic expectations. There is no timeline for how long grief should last. Dr. Wolfelt suggests taking a one-day-at-a-time approach. After all, “grief is not an enemy to be vanquished, but a necessity to be experienced as a result of having loved.” If you had to go through the loss of a grandchild, what tips do you have for other grandparents working through this difficult experience? Related Articles: Dealing with Grief How Seniors Can Develop a Resilience Toolkit How to Tell If It’s Depression or Normal Grief
more...
No comment yet.