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27 Simple Ideas To Stimulate Creativity (Infographic) - Edudemic

27 Simple Ideas To Stimulate Creativity (Infographic) - Edudemic | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Sometimes you're just stuck in a creativity rut. Check out these 27 simple ideas to boost your creativity!

Via Beth Dichter
Kathy Lynch's insight:

Thx Beth!

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Emeric Nectoux's curator insight, March 16, 2014 2:11 AM

A bunch of down to earth advices to help you catch up and/or keep your creativity flowing. 

Maryalice Leister's curator insight, March 16, 2014 7:44 AM

Appropriate when considering my personal creativity focus. Excellent visual.

Ness Crouch's curator insight, March 29, 2014 6:05 PM

I love this infographic. What do you think about the ideas?

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The Magic of Making: The Human Need to Create

The Magic of Making: The Human Need to Create | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Recently I had the privilege of facilitating two half day workshops entitled, A Framework for Maker Education. The workshop including several mini-sessions of participants creating their own maker projects (Paper Circuits, Squishy Circuits, Gami-Bots, Brush bots, and micro:bit projects). What struck me most during these creating sessions was the high degree of energy, excitement, and…
Kathy Lynch's insight:
Its not just about "maker spaces". A nice graphic and summary of the integration of PBL, choice/personalized learning, Socio-emo learning, process over product and reflection or the making of a self-directed learner.
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5 Great Questions from One of the Best Bosses My Husband Ever Had @coolcatteacher

5 Great Questions from One of the Best Bosses My Husband Ever Had @coolcatteacher | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Kip and I were talking about the best bosses we’ve ever had. Kip shared something that one of his, Mr. Joe Morris Palmer, president and founder of an engineering company, did that really brought out the best in him. Kip said that every day he was in town, Mr. Joe Morris would come by his […]
Kathy Lynch's insight:
How are you? The best first question if you really listen. Always start with the person... as teacher, as boss, as admin, as parent ... Let them know you care, then get to the issue at hand
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Keeping the Focus on the Positive

Keeping the Focus on the Positive | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Paying attention to what was going well for students led a special education teacher to a strengths-based approach to teaching.
Kathy Lynch's insight:
Start with the student! Find their strengths and build their best version of themselves using your curriculum.
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SHARE THIS WITH ALL THE SCHOOLS, PLEASE

SHARE THIS WITH ALL THE SCHOOLS, PLEASE | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
A few weeks ago, I went into Chase’s class for tutoring. I'd emailed Chase’s teacher one evening and said, “Chase keeps telling me that thi
Kathy Lynch's insight:
Always look for the lonely ones...
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Caring and Compassionate Confrontation

Caring and Compassionate Confrontation | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
When I was in my Doctoral program, I met Debbie in one of my classes who was the Corporate Education coordinator for the university. She ran workshops for teams from profit and non-profit organizations and corporations. I had mentioned that I had a background in adventure education with a focus using outdoor team building activities.…
Kathy Lynch's insight:
SO very true! Each student has their own special strengths and it is my job to uncover those strengths and shine a light on them so they can shine on long after we part. We also owe it to them to let them know the things that cast a shadow on their light. 
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2017 Education Research Highlights

2017 Education Research Highlights | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Twelve studies that educators should know about, on everything from the benefits of mentors to the most effective studying strategies.
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A List of Over 100 Awesome Essential Questions Examples by Subject

A List of Over 100 Awesome Essential Questions Examples by Subject | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Need some essential questions? You've come to the right place—here are over 100 essential questions examples by category. Dive in and discover them now!
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Good resource
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The Optimal Seating Plan? Letting Your Students Choose

The Optimal Seating Plan? Letting Your Students Choose | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Allowing students to move the furniture can help you differentiate instruction and give your students more agency in their learning.
Kathy Lynch's insight:
This is more than having flexible seating; it is having a flexible classroom. This is a more formalized version of what I have been doing!!! WooHoo!. I just need to layer in more ways of being independent because I get spread too thinly. I need to "memorialize/record" my mini lessons like a flipped classroom in the room in real time.. My students do not respond as well to the videos and visuals of others... or maybe they just need that personal touch. But this is where my students have trouble staying on track and not being pulled into social convos. Anyway, I am excited to see that I have worked into the path that others are finding successful.
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Teachers: your guide to learning strategies that really work

Teachers: your guide to learning strategies that really work | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it

"Research on effective learning reveals that an awful lot of what goes on in the classroom simply doesn’t matter. There are many pointless activities that take up valuable time in the name of engagement, merely demonstrating progress as opposed to actually making progress. Often, these approaches not only have limited impact on student learning but can have a hugely detrimental impact on teacher workload and wellbeing.

There is significant evidence to suggest that teachers should prune back what they do and focus on a more streamlined approach in the classroom. So it’s less about spending hours cutting things up and putting them in envelopes, and more about creating conditions in which students can gain long-lasting knowledge that can be applied in a range of situations. The following six principles are a distillation of key research on what really matters in the classroom."


Via John Evans
Kathy Lynch's insight:
Thx John Evans! The Graphic alone tells the story! Laminating worthy. But... there is more! One golden nugget was (paraphrasing) feedback is not grading. Give feedback about the student NOT about the work. I do not think I have ever heard that distinction made before and it is a game changer! It created a HUGE mind shift for me.
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Ashley Hoyer's comment, November 16, 2017 9:59 PM
@Tera S. Ellis You're right- it is possible that they could become a behavior problem. That makes me think of a child in my classroom- he hasn't been identified in our TAG program; however, I will be recommending him for next year. He tends to distract others and interrupt the learning of others quite possibly because he is completed and not being challenged enough.
Cheryl Turner's comment, November 16, 2017 11:13 PM
Ashley and Tera , thanks for your comments but you are misunderstanding the definition of cognitive load. It doesn't have any thing to do with gifted learners not being stimulated. It has to do with the amount of information any person can handle focusing on at any one time. For instance, if you are trying to do a difficult math problem while listening to a challenging jazz riff or perhaps watch a movie at the same time, the cognitive load of those tasks in combination is going to be excessive. in that situation, you would not be effective at the math problem, because you have increased the cognitive load of the task. You have not increased the difficulty level of the task, in terms of its abstractness or the level of challenge for the mind trying to figure it out, but you have made the conditions less than optimal for that mind to operate on that task.
Ashley Hoyer's comment, November 19, 2017 4:12 PM
@Cheryl Turner I really appreciate the clarification!
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Research suggests that students may make more academic progress by focusing on task-oriented goals than on grades

Research suggests that students may make more academic progress by focusing on task-oriented goals than on grades | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
If a student wants to earn an A in a class, the best way to do that might not involve concentrating on the grade at all.

Instead, students should set their goals on the shorter-term, more tangible parts of a class -- committing to doing homework, showing up to a certain number of classes or dedicating a set time for exam preparation -- according to a working paper (abstract available here) from the National Bureau of Economic Research.

The paper’s authors measured two types of goal setting, performance based and task based. After surveying close to 4,000 college students in two field experiments, they found that performance-based goals -- setting a goal to earn a certain grade in the class used for the survey -- didn’t have a statistically significant effect on whether a student actually got that grade. But when students set their goals on the tasks required to earn those grades, they performed better over all, even though that wasn’t explicitly their goal.

Via Edumorfosis
Kathy Lynch's insight:
Thx Edumofosis! Small goals are easier to attain & then add them up to the end goal grade
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How to Be a Lifelong Learner

How to Be a Lifelong Learner | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
The instructor of the world’s most popular MOOC explores how to change your life through being a lifelong learner in this Greater Good post by Kira Newman.
Kathy Lynch's insight:
Thx Chris Carter! A good read for my Study Skills students. A very nice synopsis of the benefits of learning with some fresh facts (only 11 minutes of walking helps! I have a chance!) that may make it more accessible. 
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The definition of Combination Learning

The definition of Combination Learning | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
The big idea of combination learning is shifting the focus from content to the process of learning.

Combination Learning allows teachers and students to work together to “mash” bits and pieces of learning to design entirely unique and personalized learning scenarios. The result is a flexible, self-directed learning environment where the teacher acts as facilitator and mentor, and the student is at the center of–and entirely accountable for–their own progress and performance.

It can be as simple or complex as the circumstances call for. It can be standards-based or open-ended; technology-based or based on in-person human interaction; project-based, game-based, rigorous, supportive, etc. In that way it is more of a shell or template for teachers and students to fill as necessary.

Via Edumorfosis
Kathy Lynch's insight:
Thx Edumorphosis
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Strategies to Build Intrinsic Motivation

Strategies to Build Intrinsic Motivation | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Encouraging student commitment ultimately brings better results than the external motivations of reward or punishment. These seven self-persuasion strategies will get you started.
Kathy Lynch's insight:
Always wondered why we built behavior systems on extrinsics like tokens when research always pointed to intrinsics as preferable.This article offers strategies to take Pink's ideas and help the intrinsic grow in students. Love it!
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3 Simple Ways to Differentiate Instruction in Any Class

3 Simple Ways to Differentiate Instruction in Any Class | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
The preference for our society, if we really want to be effective, is to teach so that they learn, not merely present curriculum and document deficiencies or meeting standards or not. I might teach the
Kathy Lynch's insight:
Grade the process not the product! It is not the destination; it is the journey. The "right" answer is irrelevant if you did not learn on your way to it. What a great rubric to use as a guide. I use stations quite regularly, but not so their is choice as suggested. This I will try. 
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Helping High Schoolers Manage Emotions

Helping High Schoolers Manage Emotions | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
De-escalation spaces allow students to leave stressful situations or interactions so they can process their emotions and then return to learning.
Kathy Lynch's insight:
What a great idea! I had a student get so angry with another he walked out of class. I was going to give him a detention and called him out of class. He was crying in the hall. He was so hurt by something someone put out on social media. I asked for him to be escorted to our Child Study Team for counseling. If he had been able to go to a specific space to decompress and also discuss it with a counselor, he might have felt like he was exerting his own positive control rather than me directing the process (which was handled appropriately by admin). This could be a rotating duty by a CST or Counseling Professional.
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Flex time: Schools break out of scheduling ruts to improve learning for students, teachers

Flex time: Schools break out of scheduling ruts to improve learning for students, teachers | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it

News, voices and jobs for education professionals. Optimized for your mobile phone.
Kathy Lynch's insight:
As a special ed science teacher the idea of flex schedules holds great appeal. I need long blocks for science experiments. However, when I have my 11 students in the classroom, I need to be able to clone myself 11 times to meet their needs and to get the individual time to conference with each. Stations etc are really independent work times or group work times and they top out at 20 minutes....
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Are you a whole teacher? A Self-Assessment to understand

Are you a whole teacher? A Self-Assessment to understand | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it

Whole Child Learning is a thing; Whole Teaching should be a thing too, no?

Here at TeachThought, Jackie Gerstein’s usergeneratededucation is at the top of our reading list, in large part for her thinking about the human side of formal education. Much of our content–that is, the content here at TeachThought, and that on her site–overlaps because of our shared perspective on teaching and learning: self-directed learning, the role of play in learning, the idea of citizenship, student-centered learning (and student-centered teaching), and more.

(The fact that we have to push ourselves to think of the “human side” could be part of our problem; teaching and learning are among the most human of processes–a natural response to our environment and curiosity.)

We’ve also long been interested in the work of Costa and Kallick with the Habits of Mind (See What Are The Habits Of Mind? and 16 Strategies For Integrating The Habits Of Mind) as wonderful supplements to an academic curriculum. More and more, they’re richness has us wondering if they’re not more important than the “content” itself.

These ideas have pushed us to consider what it is that students really need to know in a modern world, which we’re going to have spend some time this year thinking about. And it is in that whole Habits of Mind/new knowledge demands context comes Jackie’s “Twelve 21st Century Skills & Attributes: Educator Self-Assessment.” Jackie has framed this concept (modern teaching) through 12 characteristics, and again through teacher self-assessment questions for each characteristic.

The end result is a shift from academia to people to can supplement standards-based teaching and learning, or replace it altogether if we want to get all progressive and avant garde about it.


Via Edumorfosis
Kathy Lynch's insight:
Whenever I am beginning to think, "I got this!", I just just look to  self-assessments like this and realize the process of getting better is never-ending; isn't it exciting!!! Still so much to learn and to learn to do regularly...  
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Some Practical Tips to Help You Differentiate Your Teaching Strategies

Some Practical Tips to Help You Differentiate Your Teaching Strategies | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education
Kathy Lynch's insight:
Learning Stations and task cards are two of my favorite strategies for learning. Gets the students up and moving and I can meet different learners needs either through choice or by giving alternative or leveled activities for the same content
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20 Tips to Help De-escalate Interactions With Anxious or Defiant Students

20 Tips to Help De-escalate Interactions With Anxious or Defiant Students | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Interventions and strategic behaviors can help teachers manage students who are acting out or missing out on learning because of behavioral issues.
Kathy Lynch's insight:
Lots of excellent strategies and new things to try! Focus on increasing the skills by rewarding the skills not the successful behavior...
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Teaching a Class With Big Ability Differences

Teaching a Class With Big Ability Differences | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Techniques for meeting the needs of students with diverse abilities and interests.
Kathy Lynch's insight:
The everyday challenge with some new and favorite resources. A great & quick read!
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3 Ways Lesson Plans Flop—and How to Recover

3 Ways Lesson Plans Flop—and How to Recover | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Tips on how to reach your teaching goal when your initial plan fails.
Kathy Lynch's insight:
Sometimes it just doesn't work... let it go and have fun
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What Students Remember Most About Teachers

What Students Remember Most About Teachers | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it

Image is from Mindshift post on FB.

Dear Young Teacher Down the Hall,I saw you as you rushed passed me in the lunch room. Urgent. In a hurry to catch a bite before the final bell would ring calling all the students back inside.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Kathy Lynch's insight:
So true and easy to forget amidst the alphabet of demands.
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Why Mistakes Matter in Creating A Path For Learning

Why Mistakes Matter in Creating A Path For Learning | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
American educators love to emphasize correct procedure, but cognitive science says that students learn better when you focus on their mistakes.
Kathy Lynch's insight:
Publicly (but anonymously) share why mistakes are wrong and then the correct way to increase learning and resilience.
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Questioning That Deepens Comprehension

Questioning That Deepens Comprehension | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Scaffold students' thinking about complex texts by asking what the text says, how it works, what it means, and what it inspires them to do.
Kathy Lynch's insight:
Share your insight
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