Special Needs Populations
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Special Needs Populations
Accumulated articles about how to use technology with special needs populations
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Joyce Valenza's Picks from the Top 25 Websites for Teaching and Learning - The Digital Shift

Joyce Valenza's Picks from the Top 25 Websites for Teaching and Learning - The Digital Shift | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it
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Best Apps for Teaching & Learning 2013 | American Association of School Librarians (AASL)

Best Apps for Teaching & Learning 2013 | American Association of School Librarians (AASL) | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it
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Hours spent reading books around the world

Hours spent reading books around the world | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it
How many hours a week do you read? (Hours spent #reading #books around the world http://t.co/4KbMqJj3Fy via @zite #tlchat #uklibchat)
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Common Core Thrusts Librarians Into Leadership Role

Common Core Thrusts Librarians Into Leadership Role | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it

This article calls librarians "Secret Weapons" for the CCSS.  My contribution is found toward the end, and speaks to the changes our librarians have made in our WSWHE area!

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How Twitter is Reinventing Collaboration Among Educators - PBS MediaShift

How Twitter is Reinventing Collaboration Among Educators - PBS MediaShift | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it
How Twitter is Reinventing Collaboration Among EducatorsPBS MediaShiftHashtags: Educators use a lot of hashtags.
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Technology in Education: Research Says!! | Canadian Education Association (CEA)

Technology in Education: Research Says!! | Canadian Education Association (CEA) | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it
Technology in Education: Research Says!!
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The Banned Books We Have Loved

The Banned Books We Have Loved | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it
The ironic and rather wonderful thing about banning books is that the act doesn't, actually, do much to keep the books from being read. If anything, it inspires further interest in them, and sometimes sales, too.

Via Brandi Nicholauson
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Jan Manalo's comment, April 12, 2012 9:56 PM
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Top 15 iPad Book Apps – Most Exceptional Use of Animation | The Digital Media Diet

Top 15 iPad Book Apps – Most Exceptional Use of Animation | The Digital Media Diet | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it

Via Brandi Nicholauson
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Food Topic for ESL Kids

Food Topic for ESL Kids | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it
Interactive word games, quizzes and printable worksheets to practise basic English vocabulary connected with the theme Food.

Via David M, Renee Maufroid, Helen Woolley
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A Day in the Life of a Connected Educator – Using social media in 21st century classrooms

A Day in the Life of a Connected Educator – Using social media in 21st century classrooms | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it

Via Maria Palaska, Anna Bougia
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High Expectations Set For Special Education Under National Academic Standards - Disability Scoop

High Expectations Set For Special Education Under National Academic Standards - Disability Scoop | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it

This article entitled High Expectations Set For Special Education Under National Academic Standards focuses on the need for all students to have the same expectations of academic excellence in accordance with the common core standards.  Each state is being offered an incentive to adjust their curriculums to these standards of learning by the Department of Education.  The primary goal is to ensure that each child is expected to achieve and learn the same things as the next child, regardless of any special needs that may come into play.              The upholding of academic standards does not scrutinize those who have special needs, such as learning disabilities.  However, IEPs would still have to be upheld on a case by case basis due to the legalities that are associated with them.  It is the job of each state to ensure that these standards are upheld in order to allow each child to achieve a well-rounded education in preparation for college and their future careers.  In an attempt to uphold these IEPs, students with special needs would still be given the assistance needed to ensure their academic success.  However, children with special needs would still be expected to complete their work in the same way as their peers.             According to the common core standards, each child would have a certain amount of knowledge that would need to be retained per grade level.  This standards focus mainly on English and math in the classroom.  The article focuses on the need for these standards to be implemented because this issue was identified as a major concern for parents.  It is clear that there is a discrepancy between the expectations of special needs children and children that do not have any clear learning disabilities or hindrances.  In this way, all children will be on an equal playing field in the classroom.


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Stanford launches effort to improve English Language Learner access to Common Core State Standards

Stanford launches effort to improve English Language Learner access to Common Core State Standards | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it

                The needs of ELLs are becoming increasingly demanding in the United States.  K-12 students are having higher standards being put on them for success according to the common core standards.  Stanford University has joined the list of initiatives to assist ELLs, or English language learners.  They recently received two million dollars in order to strengthen their ELL efforts.  This effort is being made to ensure that all students are on one common accord with regards to language proficiency for academic success.

            On the national forefront, Kenji Hakuta is making his mark by pressing the need for the language barriers amongst students to be broken and done away with for good.  He insists that without the necessary language unity, students will not be afforded the same efforts to be successful in the classroom.  This is innovative in a nation where the Hispanic population has vastly grown in the last decade.  Spanish is the primary language of many students in the United States; consequently, the ELL population increases because they are speaking Spanish primarily at home.  Therefore, it is imperative to allow language to be stressed to students in order to communication to occur for these students to feel comfortable with the material that is placed before them. 

            These guidelines of Stanford’s ELL initiative will align with the common core standards that are being initiated as well.  Those that have been appointed to partake in these efforts are working to create a concrete list of standards and strategies to assist ELLs.  This is a national issue and the need for each state to springboard their own individual efforts according to the common core standards are essential to the success of this initiative.  With these efforts, students with language barriers can really get the attention that they seek in order to be ready for college and careers.


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Common Core State Standards: A Foundation For Differentiation

Common Core State Standards: A Foundation For Differentiation | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it

          This piece was written by Susan Savage, an ELL instructor who strongly believes in the promise of the Common Core standards.  She the outlines specific steps that educators should take to ensure the academic success of all of their students, including those with special needs.  Savage feels that differentiation is the cornerstone of any effective learning environment.  She feels that the way the teacher structures their lessons are directly correlated to the level of success that is eventually exhibited from students, and that effective structuring will allow for an equal opportunity for all students—including ELLs and those with other special needs—to succeed in the classroom.

          The first step outlined is to align the departmental or grade level standards with those of the Common Core.  Savage suggests that departments then break apart the standard into a 4 point rubric (there is a specific breakdown of this rubric linked to the article). She feels that the rubric is the best way to clearly indicate specific areas in which the student is struggling.  The rubric is beneficial not only for the teacher, but also allows the learners to chart their progress and get excited about the positive steps that they are taking.  The highest level (level 4) of the rubric, also known as the challenge level, meets the actual expectations of the Common Core State Standards.  By allowing students to slowly progress through the levels of the rubric, she feels that it gives students a better opportunity to effectively meet the expectations of the standards. 

          When planning her lessons she first outlines three proficiency skills that all of her students—including those with special needs—are expected to meet with at least 90% proficiency.  The rubric allows the more advanced students to resist the urge to speed through their work, while simultaneously encouraging classified students to effectively departmentalize the task.   By breaking down the Common Core state standards into smaller goals it allows for learners of all skill levels to eventually meet the expectations of their educational institution. 


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Education Week: Standards Organizers Leave English Proficiency to States

Education Week: Standards Organizers Leave English Proficiency to States | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it

Standards are being worked on in order for there to be widespread knowledge of the needs of ELLs, or English language learners.  The WIDA, or World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment, has established rules and standards that are being implanted in order to assist ELLs.  The task at hand for WIDA now is taking their standards and revamping them within the United States to uphold the common core standards.  WIDA has been adopted by many states in the United States already.  It is essential for the future success of ELLs in the United States. 

The cost of being associated with WIDA will not be cheap.  WIDA fees are based on the number of students that are being assisted by language services.  However, the issue lies in the consideration of ELLs.  It is unacceptable that they have not been given enough support and attention in order to ensure that they are successful according to the common core standards.  It is necessary for teachers to understand the importance of knowing and being able to assess what each student’s individual needs are, as some may be more advanced than others.  The goals is to have students become proficient enough in English that they speak it and interpret it as well as they do with their first native language.

Within the WIDA, there are not many spelled out instructions for teachers.  They are not being given a clear, concise, pedagogical advice.  Consequently, these teachers are being left open for new and innovative ways to assist their students individually in the classroom.  This could be beneficial for students because it allows them to have more attention and can lead to greater success in their futures.  Another result of WIDA is communication improvement.  WIDA is coming up with ways to allow students to participate in classroom lectures and discussions without fully understanding the language.  The idea here, which works in conjunction with No Child Left Behind, is that no child should go unaccounted for in the classroom; each child should be given the opportunity to advance academically.  Through WIDA, these limitations will be diminished for children in the coming years.

 

           


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Plagiarism and the link: How the web makes attribution easier -- and more complicated

Plagiarism and the link: How the web makes attribution easier -- and more complicated | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it
The controversy over writer Nate Thayer’s failure to credit his sources, which some alleged amounted to plagiarism, is just part of an ongoing debate over how we use — and give credit for — information in a digital age.

 

The problem is that while adding hyperlinks is a great way of avoiding a charge of plagiarism — something that might have helped Fox News opinion writer Juan Williams and other alleged plagiarists — there is no accepted protocol for how or where to add those links, or how much content someone can cut and paste into their story or blog post without crossing the line from borrowing into plagiarism or copyright infringement.


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, April 10, 2013 1:52 PM

This is an important topic for anyone that is using online sources or linking info..

Paige Jaeger 's comment, April 11, 2013 8:31 AM
As a hyperlink embedder, this is a timely post for introspection! Everyone should stop, read, and contemplate whether they are remaining true to the source. I'd like to think I have been, but it's time to reflect and inspect!
Sandra Carswell's curator insight, April 11, 2013 11:58 PM

This is also an important topic for librarians to address. We teach our students to cite sources and give attribution to the creators of materials they use in their projects. Is a link enough? And yes, just how much can you quote without losing your own voice? 

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Ten trends in technology use in education in developing countries that you may not have heard about | A World Bank Blog on ICT use in Education

Ten trends in technology use in education in developing countries that you may not have heard about | A World Bank Blog on ICT use in Education | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it

Interesting list ...


Via Yvonne Bustamante, EdD, MS, BCC
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21st Century Library Strategic Plan – Mission Statement

21st Century Library Strategic Plan – Mission Statement | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it
I posed the question – How do you get from where your library is now, to become a 21st Century Library? My simple answer was – develop a strategy. I also offered a model of a strategic plan...

Via Brandi Nicholauson
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Things I think teacher librarians should unlearn (20 & counting) « NeverEndingSearch

Things I think teacher librarians should unlearn (20 & counting) « NeverEndingSearch | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it

Via Brandi Nicholauson
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Five key roles for 21st-century school librarians | eSchool News

Five key roles for 21st-century school librarians | eSchool News | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it
Given the unprecedented quantity of information learners are exposed to, the librarian’s role is more important than ever. Librarians help all students gain access to, evaluate, ethically use, create, share, and synthesize information.

Via Brandi Nicholauson
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Teachers Guide on The Use of iPad in education

Teachers Guide on The Use of iPad in education | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it

Via Helen Woolley
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CEC | Common Core Standards: What Special Educators Need to Know

CEC | Common Core Standards: What Special Educators Need to Know | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it

The Council for Exceptional Children put out a publication titled Common Core Standards: What Special Educators Need to Know.  The central point that this piece makes is that the Common Core Standards do benefit special needs students, as long as the appropriate learning accommodations are made.  These accommodations should include the use of Braille, screen-reader technology, the use of a scribe, computer, speech-to-text technology- and other assistive devices. 

The CEC claims that special needs students do not have any more difficulty meeting the CCS than those without disabilities; however, it should be noted, that this was only able to occur when they were given specialized instruction and support to meet their learning needs.  One of the biggest hurdles seems to be changing the mindsets of teachers and administrators to raise the expectations of special needs students, and getting them to realize that they are just as capable as students who have not been classified as having a learning disability. 

This publication argues that the CCS has been created in a way that allows for all students, regardless of their specified learning ability, to be able to participate fully and meet the standard of the Common Core.  In addition it suggests that not only special educators, but all educators, need to develop an understanding of how to approach the CCS from a perspective that supports a special needs learner. 


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Common Core Standards: The Challenge for Special Education | Learn Blog

Common Core Standards: The Challenge for Special Education | Learn Blog | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it

                As parents and educators prepare to adjust to the educational standards of the Common Core, they must also tackle the needs of special education students.  This article tackles the need for effective collaboration between school officials, parents, and teachers in order to ensure the success of all students.  Many districts from around the country are struggling with the pressure that comes with such a monumental change in educational expectation—especially how these changes may potentially affect or inhibit the intellectual growth of students with certain disabilities. 

            It is the job of the educator to set high expectations for students, and to set them on a life path that will allow for continued growth and development in varied fields of learning.  The Literacy Education and Resource Network (L.E.A.R.N.) feels that the Common Core standards have effectively outlined perimeters that encourage consistent growth in all students.  They do however recognize that in order for the standards to be meaningful to learners who are affected by a learning disability, certain accommodations must first be made.

            L.E.A.R.N. suggests that administrators make it a priority to equip their teachers and student parents with ongoing system of support and development.  They are confident that this will ensure the continued success of all learners—despite their learning classification.  One of major ways to accommodate for varied levels of student need is to make sure that appropriate scaffolding is incorporated into all lessons.  Effectively scaffolded lessons will incorporate an understanding of all students’ social and academic skills.  These strategies must also be passed onto parents so that the system of support and learning can be continued at home. 


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Common Core State Standards: A Foundation For Differentiation

Common Core State Standards: A Foundation For Differentiation | Special Needs Populations | Scoop.it

          This piece was written by Susan Savage, an ELL instructor who strongly believes in the promise of the Common Core standards.  She the outlines specific steps that educators should take to ensure the academic success of all of their students, including those with special needs.  Savage feels that differentiation is the cornerstone of any effective learning environment.  She feels that the way the teacher structures their lessons are directly correlated to the level of success that is eventually exhibited from students, and that effective structuring will allow for an equal opportunity for all students—including ELLs and those with other special needs—to succeed in the classroom.

          The first step outlined is to align the departmental or grade level standards with those of the Common Core.  Savage suggests that departments then break apart the standard into a 4 point rubric (there is a specific breakdown of this rubric linked to the article). She feels that the rubric is the best way to clearly indicate specific areas in which the student is struggling.  The rubric is beneficial not only for the teacher, but also allows the learners to chart their progress and get excited about the positive steps that they are taking.  The highest level (level 4) of the rubric, also known as the challenge level, meets the actual expectations of the Common Core State Standards.  By allowing students to slowly progress through the levels of the rubric, she feels that it gives students a better opportunity to effectively meet the expectations of the standards. 

          When planning her lessons she first outlines three proficiency skills that all of her students—including those with special needs—are expected to meet with at least 90% proficiency.  The rubric allows the more advanced students to resist the urge to speed through their work, while simultaneously encouraging classified students to effectively departmentalize the task.   By breaking down the Common Core state standards into smaller goals it allows for learners of all skill levels to eventually meet the expectations of their educational institution. 


Via Sienna
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