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Visual Schedules Apps for Students with ASD

Visual Schedules Apps for Students with ASD | Special needs | Scoop.it
As Autism Awareness Month is a few days away, creating an awareness and understanding of autism as the incidence continues to increase. Also important for those of us working with students with ASD...

Via Dr. Joan McGettigan
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Rescooped by Justine Brock from Social Skills & Autism
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My Aspergers Child: Reasons Behind “Impaired Social Interaction” in Aspergers Kids

My Aspergers Child: Reasons Behind “Impaired Social Interaction” in Aspergers Kids | Special needs | Scoop.it
Reasons Behind “Impaired Social Interaction” in Aspergers Kids http://t.co/DTWjANudrc via @zite #autism #aspergers

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New research suggests that a growing backlash against diagnosis of the ... - Salon

New research suggests that a growing backlash against diagnosis of the ... - Salon | Special needs | Scoop.it
Salon
New research suggests that a growing backlash against diagnosis of the ...
Salon
Despite this lengthy history, the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD in today's children could hardly be more controversial.
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Rescooped by Justine Brock from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Dyslexia and the iPad—Overcoming Dyslexia with Technology — A book by James Nuttall

Dyslexia and the iPad—Overcoming Dyslexia with Technology — A book by James Nuttall | Special needs | Scoop.it

Dyslexia and the iPad is about  how the iPad can help you cope with school, work, and life. The iPad is a great source of support for individuals with dyslexia.


Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, April 28, 2013 12:46 PM

Publisher's description:

"...Dyslexia and the iPad is about dyslexia and how the iPad can help you cope with school, work, and life. Dyslexia affects one’s ability to read, write, learn foreign languages, and remember phone numbers and names. The iPad is a great source of support for individuals with dyslexia. You will learn how the iPad can help you access millions of e-books which can then be read aloud to you. You will learn some tricks to make writing easier. Additionally, there are a number of apps which are helpful and fun for those with dyslexia. Do not let dyslexia defeat you. The iPad can help you achieve many goals..."

Rescooped by Justine Brock from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Practical advice for parents: Telling Your Child About LD:Smart Kids with LD

Practical advice to help you with the difficult task of explaining learning differences to your child. wwwsmartkidswithld.org (Practical advice to help you with the difficult task of explaining learning differences to your child....

Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, May 1, 2013 10:51 AM

Excerpt:

"...1. Recognize the signs that your child may have learning difficulties. After you rule out physical reasons that explain his behavior, have him evaluatedby a learning specialist.

2. Educate yourself about your child’s assets and deficits before communicating the scope of the learning disability to her and other family members. Seek information from reliable websites, books, other parents, and professionals.

3. Reassure him that he’s perfectly healthy, then explain his specific learning disability in detail suitable to his age and intellect. If he hasdyslexia, for example, you may want to say that his brain works differently when he reads. If he’s been mixing up his letters, point it out as an example of what happens with dyslexia.

4. Tell him how you’re going to get help. Reinforce the fact that you and all family members will do everything it takes to guarantee his success. Share some examples of successful people with LD. With older kids, prepare material for them to read and referrals to websites that explain their specific type of LD.

5. Explain tasks she’ll find easy to complete and ones that might provide challenges. Find support professionals to cover areas you cannot manage yourself. This includes emotional as well as cognitive issues.

6. Maintain an ongoing discussion about your child’s future. Discuss your expectations and hopes—and theirs. Make sure she knows that she can excel as long as she works hard. Don’t downplay the fact that there will be frustration along the way. Reinforce the fact that you and all family members will do everything it takes to help guarantee success.

7. Communicate clearly. Make sure your child understands everything you’re saying. Children don’t think like grownups. Self-esteem is often fragile in a child with LD. Make sure he can apply the information in proactive, upbeat ways. Compliment him lavishly and often, but make sure you mean it. Never give empty or gratuitous praise.

8. Get involved in your child’s school. There is no alternative for your active and obvious presence. You are the primary advocate for guaranteeing your child’s appropriate education. Make sure that the teachers and administrators know you and know that you are overseeing the optimal delivery of her entire school program. Don’t find out too late thataccommodations were not carried out.

9. Tell your child at least once every day, “I love you.” This advice works well for kids without LD too, but for those with LD, it’s as critical as food and shelter.

There may be few things more difficult than having these important discussions with your child, but if you get stuck, keep going back to No. 9. It’s more important than all the others combined...."

  
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TCM Classic Film Fest: Robert Benton on His Films, Dyslexia and Directing ... - Hollywood Reporter

TCM Classic Film Fest: Robert Benton on His Films, Dyslexia and Directing ... - Hollywood Reporter | Special needs | Scoop.it
TCM Classic Film Fest: Robert Benton on His Films, Dyslexia and Directing ...
Hollywood Reporter
Born near Dallas in 1932, Benton, as a child, suffered from severe dyslexia that prevented him from reading or writing very well.

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Lou Salza's curator insight, May 1, 2013 10:56 AM

Excerpt:

"...During the fourth annual TCM Classic Film Festival, which just came to a close after running in Hollywood from Thursday through Sunday, I had the opportunity to sit down with one of the festival's special guests, legendary writer-director Robert Benton, for an in-depth interview about his life and career. The 80-year-old, a three-time Oscar winner, is best known as one of the writers of Arthur Penn's Bonnie and Clyde (1967); the writer-director of Kramer vs. Kramer (1979) and Places in the Heart (1984); and as a man whose films tend to be intimate examinations of family and community..."