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NASA’s Earth Science Division Plays A Critical Role In Understanding Climate Change

NASA’s Earth Science Division Plays A Critical Role In Understanding Climate Change | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it
Critics say NASA’s Earth Science Division is a waste of taxpayer dollars and a distraction from the agency’s core mission of space exploration.But NASA has a critical role to play in understanding human-caused climate change, by operating satellites that monitor the Earth’s forests, deserts, oceans...
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Using Bloom's To Target The Objectives

Using Bloom's To Target The Objectives | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it

Using Bloom’s to Target the Objectives


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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, July 23, 2013 6:12 PM

Blogging is not the only way to create and presentation is not the only medium at that level.

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Camille Wardrop Alleyne: Women in Science

Camille Wardrop Alleyne: Women in Science | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it

 As a NASA scientist, she now helps run the International Space Station.


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RACE TO SPACE | 2015 SPACE CAMP SCHOLARSHIP

RACE TO SPACE | 2015 SPACE CAMP SCHOLARSHIP | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it
YOUR VIDEO COULD SEND YOU TO SPACE CAMP!
Have you ever dreamed of being an astronaut? Your skills in science, math and English can help make your dream come true!
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Missouri S&T earns accreditation for Intensive English Program - The Rolla Daily News

Missouri S&T earns accreditation for Intensive English Program - The Rolla Daily News | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it
Missouri University of Science and Technology has earned initial one-year accreditation of its Intensive English Program by a national accrediting agency
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Documentary Film Science Civil Engineering ll Science of Concrete National Geographic Documentary

documentary films, documentary films english subtitles, documentary films national geographic, documentary films national geographic hd, documentary films ...
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Mapping US History with GIS

Mapping US History with GIS | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Michele Lally's insight:

I feel so drawn to and inspired by this curricula, I must study and get certified in the social sciences!

 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 4, 2015 10:26 AM

Get students thinking about patterns and the 'why's' of history with a focus on the geography and movement behind the historical story.  This is the link to some of the digital maps that can help you put history in it's place.  For more lesson plans, click here


Tags: historical, USA, mappingspatial, GIS,  ESRI, edtech.

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20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities

20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it

NOTE: To subscribe to the RSS feed of Amazing Science, copy http://www.scoop.it/t/amazing-science/rss.xml into the URL field of your browser and click "subscribe".

 

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All my Tweets and Scoop.It! posts sorted and searchable:

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NOTE: All articles in the amazing-science newsletter can also be sorted by topic. To do so, click the FIND buntton (symbolized by the FUNNEL on the top right of the screen)  and display all the relevant postings SORTED by TOPICS.

 

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Arturo Pereira's curator insight, August 12, 2017 9:01 AM
The democratization of knowledge!
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FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities
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Hidden water below Antarctica provides hope for life on Mars

The McMurdo Dry Valleys form the largest ice-free region in Antarctica. They also make up the coldest and driest environments on the planet. Yet, despite these extreme conditions, the valleys' surface is home to a large diversity of microbial life. Now, new evidence suggests that a vast network of salty liquid water exists 1,000 feet below the surface — a finding that lends support to the idea that microbial life may exist beneath Antarctica's surface as well. The finding isn't just exciting for Earth ecologists, however; planetary scientists are intrigued as well. Indeed, finding salty liquid water below Antarctica provides strong support for the idea that Mars, an environment that resembles Antarctic summers, may have similar aquifers beneath its surface — aquifers that could support microscopic life.

 

"Before this study, we didn't know to what extent life could exist beneath the glaciers, beneath hundreds of meters of ice, beneath ice covered lakes and deep into the soil," says Ross Virginia, an ecosystem environmentalist at Dartmouth College and a co-author of the study, published in Nature Communications today. This study opens up "possibilities for better understanding the combinations of factors that might be found on other planets and bodies outside of the Earth" — including Mars.


Approximately 4.5 billion years ago, 20 percent of the Martian surface was likely covered in water. Today, Mars may still be home to small amounts of salty liquid water, which would exist on the planet's soil at night before evaporating during the daytime. Taken together, these findings are pretty exciting for those who hope to discover life on Mars — water, after all, is a requirement for life. Unfortunately, researchers have also pointed out that the Martian surface is far too cold for the survival of any known forms of life. That's why some scientists have started to wonder about what may lie beneath the Martian surface. If the extreme environment conditions found in Antarctica's subsurface contains all the elements necessary for life, it's possible that the Martian subsurface might as well.


In the study, researchers flew a helicopter more than 114 square miles over Taylor Valley— the southernmost of the three dry valleys. Below the helicopter, researchers suspended a large antenna. The technology, called SkyTem, acted as an airborne electromagnetic sensor that generated an electromagnetic field capable of penetrating through ice or into the soil in the dry valley. As the antenna surveyed the valley, the electromagnetic field reflected back information that was altered from the original signal depending on whether it encountered a brine or frozen soil or ice, Virginia explains. "So basically we're inferring the distribution of those types of materials based on what is reflected back to these helicopters flying over the surface of Antarctica."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Learn how to use 'suggest' and make suggestions in English - YouTube

Share your videos with friends, family and the world

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Shanthi Cumaraswamy Streat's curator insight, April 20, 2015 5:15 AM

Yet another excellent video by the super talented Vicki Hollett on how to use 'suggest' and make suggestions in English. Especially useful for our learners preparing for IELTS and TOEFL.

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New instrument dates old skeleton before 'Lucy'; 'Little Foot' is 3.67 million years old

New instrument dates old skeleton before 'Lucy'; 'Little Foot' is 3.67 million years old | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it

A skeleton skeleton named Little Foot is among the oldest hominid skeletons ever dated at 3.67 million years old, according to an advanced dating method. Little Foot is a rare, nearly complete skeleton of Australopithecus first discovered 21 years ago in a cave at Sterkfontein, in central South Africa.


The new date places Little Foot as an older relative of Lucy, a famous Australopithecus skeleton dated at 3.2 million years old that was found in Ethiopia. It is thought that Australopithecus is an evolutionary ancestor to humans that lived between 2 million and 4 million years ago. Stone tools found at a different level of the cave also were dated at 2.18 million years old, making them among the oldest known stone tools in South Africa.


A team of scientists from Purdue University; the University of the Witwatersrand, in South Africa; the University of New Brunswick, in Canada; and the University of Toulouse, in France, performed the research, which will be featured in the journal Nature. Ronald Clarke, a professor in the Evolutionary Studies Institute at the University of the Witwatersrand who discovered the Little Foot skeleton, said the fossil represents Australopithecus prometheus, a species very different from its contemporary, Australopithecus afarensis, and with more similarities to the Paranthropus lineage.


"It demonstrates that the later hominids, for example, Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus did not all have to have derived from Australopithecus afarensis," he said. "We have only a small number of sites and we tend to base our evolutionary scenarios on the few fossils we have from those sites. This new date is a reminder that there could well have been many species of Australopithecus extending over a much wider area of Africa."


There had not been a consensus on the age of the Little Foot skeleton, named for four small foot bones found in a box of animal fossils that led to the skeleton's discovery. Previous dates ranged from 2 million to 4 million years old, with an estimate of 3 million years old preferred by paleontologists familiar with the site, said Darryl Granger, a professor of earth, atmospheric and planetary sciences at Purdue, who in collaboration with Ryan Gibbon, a former postdoctoral researcher, led the team and performed the dating.


The dating relied on a radioisotopic dating technique pioneered by Granger coupled with a powerful detector originally intended to analyze solar wind samples from NASA's Genesis mission. The result was a a relatively small margin of error of 160,000 years for Little Foot and 210,000 years for the stone tools.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 3, 2015 8:52 AM

And thus science is re-written yet again ... that seems to be a constant.

Gloria wwww's curator insight, September 1, 2015 4:49 PM

This is so amazing!!! Imagine holding this in your own hands and just looking at an ancestors skull!!! and wow!! just my favorite one so far and as they say "Australopithecus skeleton" which meaning found the skeleton millions of years ago! but the name little foot is kinda giving me the giggles because its a skull in the picture. In paragraph 4 it explains that there aren't many sites they put "evolutionary scenarios" I would absolutely love to find out what websites I could look at images of Australopithecus skeletons!! and amazing how the scientist were able to find stone tools and able to find out it was dated back to a women named "Lucy" and that she was found Ethiopia! definitely scooping this! 

  -kayle

3rd period earth/ environmental science!

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The English hospitals that need more Polish nurses to talk to patients

The English hospitals that need more Polish nurses to talk to patients | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it
Hospitals are to hire Eastern European nurses because so many patients cannot speak English, making it hard for doctors to understand their health concerns.

Via @NewDayStarts
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It is crucial for nurses become able to interpret translating technology and respond to  patients' needs.

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Texas State Board Of Education Reviews New Social Studies Textbooks | Houston Public Media

Texas State Board Of Education Reviews New Social Studies Textbooks | Houston Public Media | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it
Texas has not approved new books since 2002 and since new learning standards were created in 2010.

Via CEC Houston
Michele Lally's insight:

I personally find arrogance in Texas to be offensive if not illegal. I "pray" this damaging error gets ratified sooner than later.  All students deserve to benefit from information delivered scientifically and with compassion.

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World Oceans Day (June 8)

World Oceans Day (June 8) | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it

An Intermediate English listening lesson about the Pacific Trash Vortex.


Via Sue Lyon-Jones
Michele Lally's insight:

What are the ways in which we can improve this major problem?

ML

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Landon Conner's curator insight, December 3, 2015 10:05 AM

The trash vortex is a major issue on our planet. Not only to the animals getting caught and dying in this trash but for the people that make this trash. If trash like this continues to grow, pollution will increase more and more! Our society needs to to abide by the 3 R's (Reduce, Reuse, Recycle). And by this, we can get our planet back into the right shape! LDC

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Why Are These Doctors So Mad? What It Means for You - Huffington Post

Why Are These Doctors So Mad? What It Means for You - Huffington Post | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it
The public has the biggest stake in the outcome of whether physicians should be expected to have independent assessment of their knowledge and performance in practice. We have been left out of the debate.
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Camille Wardrop Alleyne: Women in Science

Camille Wardrop Alleyne: Women in Science | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it

 As a NASA scientist, she now helps run the International Space Station.


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Advanced Alien Civilizations Still Science Fiction — For Now

Advanced Alien Civilizations Still Science Fiction — For Now | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it
A team of scientists used NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer spacecraft to hunt for telltale heat signatures coming from 100,000 galaxies. They found no smoking guns.
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A year after Common Core, the next battle could be Indiana's new science standards

A year after Common Core, the next battle could be Indiana's new science standards | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it
The Indiana Department of Education is set to update the state’s science standards, but some are worried it’ll rely too […]
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Science of Gita (ISKCON, Boston)

A discourse on 'Science of Gita' at ISKCON, Boston, USA. Dr. Keshav Anand Das graduated in the year 1999 as a medical doctor from India. He then took ...
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How to visit Tuscany and learn Italian

How to visit Tuscany and learn Italian | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it
There are a myriad ways to learn Italian in Tuscany, for example you can visit the region’s monuments and museums with an Italian teacher/tour guide!

Via Mariano Pallottini
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Italia e' troppo bella, andiamo!!!

 

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Fresh evidence for how water reached Earth found in asteroid debris

Fresh evidence for how water reached Earth found in asteroid debris | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it

Water delivery via asteroids or comets is likely taking place in many other planetary systems, just as it happened on Earth, new research strongly suggests. Published by the Royal Astronomical Society and led by the University of Warwick, the research finds evidence for numerous planetary bodies, including asteroids and comets, containing large amounts of water.


The research findings add further support to the possibility water can be delivered to Earth-like planets via such bodies to create a suitable environment for the formation of life. Commenting on the findings lead researcher Dr Roberto Raddi, of the University of Warwick's Astronomy and Astrophysics Group, said: "Our research has found that, rather than being unique, water-rich asteroids similar to those found in our Solar System appear to be frequent. Accordingly, many planets may have contained a volume of water, comparable to that contained in the Earth.


"It is believed that the Earth was initially dry, but our research strongly supports the view that the oceans we have today were created as a result of impacts by water-rich comets or asteroids."


In observations obtained at the William Herschel Telescope in the Canary Islands, the University of Warwick astronomers detected a large quantity of hydrogen and oxygen in the atmosphere of a white dwarf (known as SDSS J1242+5226). The quantities found provide the evidence that a water-rich exo-asteroid was disrupted and eventually delivered the water it contained onto the star.


The asteroid, the researchers discovered, was comparable in size to Ceres -- at 900km across, the largest asteroid in the Solar System. "The amount of water found SDSS J1242+5226 is equivalent to 30-35% of the oceans on Earth," explained Dr Raddi.


The impact of water-rich asteroids or comets onto a planet or white dwarf results in the mixing of hydrogen and oxygen into the atmosphere. Both elements were detected in large amounts in SDSS J1242+5226.


Research co-author Professor Boris Gänsicke, also of University of Warwick, explained: "Oxygen, which is a relatively heavy element, will sink deep down over time, and hence a while after the disruption event is over, it will no longer be visible. "In contrast, hydrogen is the lightest element; it will always remain floating near the surface of the white dwarf where it can easily be detected. There are many white dwarfs that hold large amounts of hydrogen in their atmospheres, and this new study suggests that this is evidence that water-rich asteroids or comets are common around other stars than the Sun."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Is the universe a hologram? New calculations show that this may be fundamental feature of space itself

Is the universe a hologram? New calculations show that this may be fundamental feature of space itself | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it

At first glance, there is not the slightest doubt: to us, the universe looks three dimensional. But one of the most fruitful theories of theoretical physics in the last two decades is challenging this assumption. The "holographic principle" asserts that a mathematical description of the universe actually requires one fewer dimension than it seems. What we perceive as three dimensional may just be the image of two dimensional processes on a huge cosmic horizon.


Up until now, this principle has only been studied in exotic spaces with negative curvature. This is interesting from a theoretical point of view, but such spaces are quite different from the space in our own universe. Results obtained by scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) now suggest that the holographic principle even holds in a flat spacetime.


Gravitational phenomena are described in a theory with three spatial dimensions, the behavior of quantum particles is calculated in a theory with just two spatial dimensions - and the results of both calculations can be mapped onto each other. Such a correspondence is quite surprising. It is like finding out that equations from an astronomy textbook can also be used to repair a CD-player. But this method has proven to be very successful. More than ten thousand scientific papers about Maldacena's "AdS-CFT-correspondence" have been published to date.


For theoretical physics, this is extremely important, but it does not seem to have much to do with our own universe. Apparently, we do not live in such an anti-de-sitter-space. These spaces have quite peculiar properties. They are negatively curved, any object thrown away on a straight line will eventually return. "Our universe, in contrast, is quite flat - and on astronomic distances, it has positive curvature", says Daniel Grumiller.


However, Grumiller has suspected for quite some time that a correspondence principle could also hold true for our real universe. To test this hypothesis, gravitational theories have to be constructed, which do not require exotic anti-de-sitter spaces, but live in a flat space. For three years, he and his team at TU Wien (Vienna) have been working on that, in cooperation with the University of Edinburgh, Harvard, IISER Pune, the MIT and the University of Kyoto. Now Grumiller and colleagues from India and Japan have published an article in the journal Physical Review Letters, confirming the validity of the correspondence principle in a flat universe.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Mapping the Spread of Drought Across the U.S.

Mapping the Spread of Drought Across the U.S. | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it
Droughts appear to be intensifying over much of the West and Southwest as a result of global warming. Over the past decade, droughts in some regions have rivaled the epic dry spells of the 1930s and 1950s. About 37 percent of the contiguous United States was in at least a moderate drought as of March 31, 2015.
Things have been particularly bad in California, which has just imposed its first mandatory water restrictions, the latest in a series of drastic measures to reduce water consumption. California farmers, without water from reservoirs in the Central Valley, are left to choose which of their crops to water. Parts of Texas, Oklahoma and surrounding states are also suffering from drought conditions.
The relationship between the climate and droughts is complicated. Parts of the country are becoming wetter: East of the Mississippi, rainfall has been rising. But global warming also appears to be causing moisture to evaporate faster in places that were already dry. Researchers believe drought conditions in these places are likely to intensify in coming years.
There has been little relief for some places since the summer of 2012. At the recent peak last May, about 40 percent of the country was abnormally dry or in at least a moderate drought.
The patterns above come from the Drought Monitor, which has data going back to 2000. A different measure, the Palmer Index, goes back more than a hundred years. It does lag the Drought Monitor data by more than a month, so it’s less useful for measuring what’s happening right now. But the Palmer Index shows how unusual the current period is. A 10-year average of Palmer values has been increasing for most of the last 20 years, which is to say that the country is in the midst of one of its most sustained periods of increasing drought on record.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Michele Lally's insight:

I would appreciate and will participate in step-by-step efforts individuals should actively do to help publish and ameliorate this crisis.

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 5, 2015 9:03 AM

Climate change is all about the "Pendulum Effect," where the extremes is what matters, not so much the median or average. The average may fluctuate some, but the real problem comes when the weather goes haywire. Too much water can be as destructive as too little water, and this doesn't only happen in time but in space as well, where regions get too much of one and too little of the other. We'll see strips of drought and strips of wetness, strips of cold and strips of heat, like bands across regions and across the planet.

Julie Nordskog Andrews's curator insight, May 20, 2015 11:40 AM

Drought map. Find this!

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Calestous Juma sur Twitter

Calestous Juma sur Twitter | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it
The social function of #science #education pic.twitter.com/a9UOQxEZ6d
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World Library of Science

World Library of Science | Special Education, use art, improve core curricula performance | Scoop.it
World Library Of Science is an open online teaching/learning portal combining high quality educational articles authored by editors at NPG with technology-based community features to fuel a global exchange of scientific insights, teaching...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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