special education history
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The Future of America's “No Child Left Behind” Reforms » Scholars ...

The Future of America's “No Child Left Behind” Reforms » Scholars ... | special education history | Scoop.it
The 2002 reauthorization, known as No Child Left Behind, included major bipartisan efforts to expose achievement gaps between sets of children and hold schools accountable for closing the gaps and helping all children ...
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Nichelle Plivelic's comment, February 20, 2014 9:24 PM
In 2002, No Child Left Behind aimed to "expose achievement gaps between sets of children" and close this gap. For special needs children, this could be good because they will be at the same educational level as their peers. However, there could be serious problems with this because a lot of children-with and without special needs- struggle in different subjects and school and are likely not to do as well as required by No Child Left Behind.
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Special Education 101

Special Education 101 | special education history | Scoop.it
Special education is a diverse field of teaching with a growing need for great educators.

Via Denver Leigh Watson, M.Ed, LDTC
Nichelle Plivelic's insight:

Between 2010 and 1976, the percentage of students with a specific learning disability rose from only 22% to 38%. However, this isn't entirely good news-back in 2000, 46% of these students had a specific learning disability. For whatever reason, the amount has dropped by almost 10%. Now, nearly 60% of children with special needs aren't diagnosed with anything specific. This is still much better than in the 70's, though.

 

An increasing amount of these children are spending most of their time in a general education classroom. Special needs kids are spending around 80% of their time learning with peers who don't have special needs like they do. Earlier in the 1990's, this amount of time was less common. In 1990-91, it was usually as much as 79% to only 40%.

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FL Law Gives Parents of Special Education Students the Power to ...

FL Law Gives Parents of Special Education Students the Power to ... | special education history | Scoop.it
Parents of students with disabilities likely will have more say in their children's education and those with profoundly disabled kids should find it easier to exempt their kids from Florida's testing requirements, under a bill Gov.
Nichelle Plivelic's insight:

Even now, there are important events occurring relating to the history of special ed. In Florida, a law passed recently will allow special needs children to be exempt for certain testing requirements.

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Part 5-History of Legal Issues in Special Education

Part 5-History of Legal Issues in Special Education.
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Nichelle Plivelic's comment, February 20, 2014 4:10 PM
In 1975, the P.L 94-192 act was passed by Congress. IT originally covered children aged 6-21 years old and was the Education for All Handicapped Children Act, or the EHA. It ensured every child could have a "free appropriate public education". Every student got an IEP, which included short and long term goals for the child. It has been renewed or amended four times-in 1986, 1990, 1997, and 2004. In 1986, it was changed to include children from birth to 5 years old. The second time it was reauthorized, 1990, it became IDEA-Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. After being revised in 1997 and 2004, it is now the IDEIA(Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act) and classified as Public Law 108-446. Now, because of IDEIA, 95% of children with disabilities are educated in general education buildings.
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Part 2--History of Legal Issues in Special Education

Part 2--History of Legal Issues in Special Education.
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Nichelle Plivelic's comment, February 20, 2014 9:45 PM
After noticing that disabled people-including children- were having their rights violated, the government realized it was time to do something about it. They looked at the Brown case and figured that schools shouldn't be allowed to segregate children for reasons other than race, including whether or not they were disabled in any way. Former President JFK initiated a Presidential Panel on Mental Retardation in 1961. His sister, Eunice Kennedy Shriver, founded the Special Olympics in 1968, "celebrating and accepting people with intellectual disabilities as athletes".
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The Americans with Disabilities Act - ADA

The Americans with Disabilities Act - ADA | special education history | Scoop.it
President George Bush signed the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) into law on July 26, 1990. This law prohibits any form of discrimination against individuals who have disabilities.

Via Moshe Zchut
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Nichelle Plivelic's comment, February 20, 2014 8:54 PM
In 1990, the ADA(Americans with Disabilities Act) was enacted. It made discriminating against disabled people a crime.
Nichelle Plivelic's comment, February 20, 2014 8:55 PM
This includes discrimination in " employment, transportation, public accommodation, communications, and governmental activities". http://www.dol.gov/dol/topic/disability/ada.htm
Sonialyn Ulberg's curator insight, April 27, 2014 3:12 AM

Pres. Bush signs an act ensuring equal and accommodating treatment....

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Trends in Special Education Infographic | e-Learning Infographics

Trends in Special Education Infographic | e-Learning Infographics | special education history | Scoop.it
Check the Special Education Trends Infographic to learn about the history of special education and how students with learning disabilities have become able to participate in normal activities with their peers.

Via Collection of First
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Nichelle Plivelic's comment, February 20, 2014 6:33 PM
Today, all children have a right to an education, even those with special needs. However, this wasn't always the case. In ancient Rome, these children were not seen positively. In fact, the Romans believed that if a child was born with some kind of disability, it was a sign that the gods were angry. Later in history, in colonial America, it was difficult to educate a child with special needs because they would either be home schooled or parents had to pay for a private education. Luckily, changes occurred throughout history that made things far easier for these kids. One major change was when the Connecticut Asylum at Hartford for the Instruction of Deaf and Dumb Persons opened in 1817. In 1829, children who had trouble with vision could attend the New England Asylum for the Blind. Within a year, the enrollment at the former jumped from 7 to 33. At the latter, enrollment jumped from 6 to 60 within a decade.
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Planning for the Needs of Exceptional Children - WealthManagement.com

Planning for the Needs of Exceptional Children WealthManagement.com Each of these children, like Jane, will face unique challenges as they transition into adulthood, attempt to gain functional independence, seek to become productive members of...
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Nichelle Plivelic's comment, February 20, 2014 3:29 PM
After the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act began, children on the special needs spectrum were required to receive an IEP, or an Individualized Education Program . Families have financial concerns related to making sure their child can be taken care of. The most well known way of addressing this problem is the SNT, Special Needs Trust, which was included in the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993. Recently, pooled SNTs have become popular.
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Part 4--History of Legal Issues in Special Education

Part 4--History of Legal Issues in Special Education.
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Nichelle Plivelic's comment, February 20, 2014 9:35 PM
The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 makes it illegal to discriminate against individuals who "receive funds by federal subsidies and grants". This includes most postsecondary institutions and all public schools, elementary and secondary. For years, disabled students couldn't get a basic education and were excluded or segregated from being educated among their peers. As a result, families lobbied for the rights of these children and this act was a result.