Speakeasies & Jazz Age by TG
568 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Tevon Gibson
Scoop.it!

Two Paragraphs

Two Paragraphs
Tevon Gibson's insight:

Paragraph #1: Write a brief background on you topic and how it started or came to be. Explain what your topic is as if you reader has never heard of it before. Make sure you provide expert information about your topic in clear and focused sentences. (12 sentences)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paragraph #2: How did you topic effect or change society, the economy or culture of America in the 1920s? What influence did it have and for how long? (12 sentences)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tevon Gibson
Scoop.it!

Current Event 2

Current Event 2 | Speakeasies & Jazz Age by TG | Scoop.it
Cheers! Raise a glass for the 75th anniversary of Repeal Day, which commemorates Dec. 5, 1933, the day the 18th Amendment was repealed, ending Prohibition.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tevon Gibson
Scoop.it!

Current Event

Current Event | Speakeasies & Jazz Age by TG | Scoop.it
The smell of pot hung heavy in the air as men with dreadlocks and gray beards contemplated a nightmarish possibility in this legendary region of outlaw marijuana growers: legal weed.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tevon Gibson
Scoop.it!

Primary Document 1

please.enter.description...

Tevon Gibson's insight:

Annotation:

 

This paper is from the Treasury Department. It was written on February 28, 1928. It is a primary document of a memorandum wired note. It is about how illegal alchohal was seized. The person who wrote this was named Lynn.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tevon Gibson
Scoop.it!

Topic Website 2

The period from the end of the World War I until the start of the Great Depression in 1929 is known as the "Jazz Age". Jazz had become popular music in the United States, although older generations considered the music immoral and threatening to old cultural values.[1] Dances such as the Charleston and the Black Bottom were very popular during the period, and jazz bands typically consisted of seven to twelve musicians. Important orchestras in New York were led by Fletcher Henderson, Paul Whiteman and Duke Ellington. Many New Orleans jazzmen had moved to Chicago during the late 1910s in search of employment; among others, the New Orleans Rhythm Kings, King Oliver's Creole Jazz Band and Jelly Roll Morton recorded in the city. However, Chicago's importance as a center of jazz music started to diminish toward the end of the 1920s in favor of New York.[2]

In the early years of jazz, record companies were often eager to decide what songs were to be recorded by their artists. Popular numbers in the 1920s were pop hits such as "Sweet Georgia Brown", "Dinah" and "Bye Bye Blackbird". The first jazz artist to be given some liberty in choosing his material was Louis Armstrong, whose band helped popularize many of the early standards in the 1920s and 1930s.[3]

Some compositions written by jazz artists have endured as standards, including Fats Waller's "Honeysuckle Rose" and "Ain't Misbehavin'". The most recorded 1920s standard is Hoagy Carmichael and Mitchell Parish's "Stardust".[4] Several songs written by Broadway composers in the 1920s have become standards, such as George and Ira Gershwin's "The Man I Love" (1924), Irving Berlin's "Blue Skies" (1927) and Cole Porter's "What Is This Thing Called Love?" (1929). However, it was not until the 1930s that musicians became comfortable with the harmonic and melodic sophistication of Broadway tunes and started including them regularly in their repertoire.[2]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tevon Gibson
Scoop.it!

Vocabulary

1.Recreational- relating to or denoting activity done for enjoyment when one is not working.

The pool at the clubhouse was for recreational use only.

2. Association- a group of people organized for a joint purpose.

I have alot of association time at work.

3. Marijuana- cannabis, esp. as smoked in cigarettes.

I have to go to Marijuana classes.

4. Agribusinesses- agriculture conducted on commercial principles, esp. using advanced technology. The agribusinesses of America are very successful with the produce of organic food.

5. Plastered- a soft mixture of lime with sand or cement and water for spreading on walls, ceilings, or other structures to form a smooth hard surface when dried. He plastered the paint on the walls to get done with painting faster.

6. Cultivate- prepare and use (land) for crops or gardening. He went and cultivated the land so he could grow things faster.

7. Puny- small and weak. That guy is very puny.

8. Legalization- make (something that was previously illegal) permissible by law. Since people wanted to legalize mariquana, it was the process of legalization of mariquana.

9. Dreadlocked- a hairstyle in which the hair is washed but not combed and twisted while wet into tight braids or ringlets hanging down on all sides. He had dreadlocks in his hair.

10. Prohibition- the action of forbidding something. The sale of illegal liquor was called prohibition.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tevon Gibson
Scoop.it!

Primary Document 2

Primary Document 2 | Speakeasies & Jazz Age by TG | Scoop.it
Since the 1850s, when local option laws
prohibited the sale of liquor to "any man against the known wishes of
his wife," Kansas had made it tough—but not impossible—for a man to...
Tevon Gibson's insight:

Annotation:

 

This document was written in 1948. This is a primary document from a newspaper. It talks about how hard it was for a person to find a drink, to drink. They called people who were against drinking the "dry-hards." They also talked about a preacher who was against drinking.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tevon Gibson
Scoop.it!

Primary Document 3

Primary Document 3 | Speakeasies & Jazz Age by TG | Scoop.it
prohibition 1920,prohibition in the 1920s,alcohol prohibition,prohibition of alcohol,what is prohibition,prohibition amendment,prohibition history,1920s prohibition,prohibition primary sources,21st amendment,volstead act 21st amendment,effects of ...

 

Tevon Gibson's insight:

Annotation:

 

This primary document is a primary document with Collier's Magazine. It was written in 1924. It talked about prohibition. It is about Mabel Wildebrandt and how she was the assistant to the secretary of the US back then. This article is also about her noting how people will actually go to see that people do not drink anymore. She thought that the law enforcement should help them in keeping drinking illegal.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tevon Gibson
Scoop.it!

Topic Website 3

Joe "King" Oliver (May 11, 1885 – April 10, 1938) was a jazz cornet player and bandleader. He was particularly noted for his playing style, pioneering the use of mutes. Also a notable composer, he wrote many tunes still played regularly, including "Dipper Mouth Blues", "Sweet Like This", "Canal Street Blues", and "Doctor Jazz". He was the mentor and teacher of Louis Armstrong. His influence was such that Armstrong claimed, "if it had not been for Joe Oliver, jazz would not be what it is today".[2]

Joseph Oliver was born in Aben, Louisiana, near Donaldsonville in Ascension Parish, and moved to New Orleans in his youth. Oliver played cornet in the New Orleans brass bands and dance bands and also in the city's red-light district, Storyville. The band he co-led with trombonist Kid Ory was considered New Orleans' hottest and best in the 1910s. Oliver achieved great popularity in New Orleans across economic and racial lines, and was in demand for playing jobs from rough working-class black dance halls to white society debutante parties.

According to an interview at the Tulane's Hogan Jazz Archive with Oliver's widow Stella Oliver, in 1919 a fight broke out at a dance where Oliver was playing, and the police arrested him, his band, and the fighters. This made Oliver decide to leave the Jim Crow South.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tevon Gibson
Scoop.it!

Topic Website 1

A speakeasy, also called a blind pig or blind tiger, is an establishment that illegally sells alcoholic beverages. Such establishments came into prominence in the United States during the period known as Prohibition (1920–1933, longer in some states). During this time, the sale, manufacture, and transportation (bootlegging) of alcoholic beverages was illegal throughout the United States.

According to an 1889 newspaper, “Unlicensed saloons in Pennsylvania are known as ‘speak-easies.’”[1] They were so called because of the practice of speaking quietly about such a place in public, or when inside it, so as not to alert the police or neighbors.[2]

Speakeasies were numerous and popular during the Prohibition years. Some of them were operated by people who were part of organized crime. Even though police and agents of the Bureau of Prohibition would often raid them and arrest their owners and patrons, they were so profitable that they continued to flourish.

more...
No comment yet.