Spanish Grammar
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Quick Way To Learn Spanish Verbs

Spanish verbs are probably the most difficult and the most complex areas of the Spanish Language. Spanish verbs are split into 3 main groups, those verbs that end in -ar, -er and -ir, each of the verbs in these verb groups has multiple endings to indicate who or what is performing an action. There are also numerous irregular verbs that follow their own specific verb pattern that must also be learnt and many of these are used frequently in everyday conversation such as; to be and; to have. The complexities do not stop there because there are 16 different tenses that are each conjugated differently, these 16 tenses are split into 8 simple tenses and 8 perfect (compound) tenses and it is these perfect tenses that should give you a clue as to the verb many, including myself, deem to be the most important verb in Spanish. There are four distinct types of Spanish verb and they are; regular, irregular, reflexive and auxiliary and there is one specific auxiliary verb that is used with the past participle of every single verb in Spanish in each of the 8 perfect tenses. That verb of which I am writing about is haber meaning to have. Understanding, and knowing, the various conjugations of haber will make it possible to use verbs more extensively. The perfect tenses are those tenses that describe a completed task, for example: I have been; I had been; I was; I will have been and, I would have been, are all perfect tenses that will use haber as an auxiliary verb. In both English and Spanish, the perfect tenses are formed by using haber, followed by the past participle (el participio in Spanish). In English, the participle typically is formed by adding -ed to the end of verbs; the Spanish participle, which has origins related to the English participle, typically is formed by adding -ado for -ar verbs and -ido for -er and -ir verbs. The verb tense in the perfect tenses is decided by which simple tense of haber is being used: for example if we said: I have eaten and I will have eaten the only way to distinguish between the two would be the tense of the auxiliary verb being used; I have eaten = he comido and I will have eaten = habr


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candy2ghsy's curator insight, March 3, 2013 9:50 PM

Spanish verbs are probably the most difficult and the most complex areas of the Spanish Language. Spanish verbs are split into 3 main groups, those verbs that end in -ar, -er and -ir, each of the verbs in these verb groups has multiple endings to indicate who or what is performing an action. There are also numerous irregular verbs that follow their own specific verb pattern that must also be learnt and many of these are used frequently in everyday conversation such as; to be and; to have. The complexities do not stop there because there are 16 different tenses that are each conjugated differently, these 16 tenses are split into 8 simple tenses and 8 perfect (compound) tenses and it is these perfect tenses that should give you a clue as to the verb many, including myself, deem to be the most important verb in Spanish. There are four distinct types of Spanish verb and they are; regular, irregular, reflexive and auxiliary and there is one specific auxiliary verb that is used with the past participle of every single verb in Spanish in each of the 8 perfect tenses. That verb of which I am writing about is haber meaning to have. Understanding, and knowing, the various conjugations of haber will make it possible to use verbs more extensively. The perfect tenses are those tenses that describe a completed task, for example: I have been; I had been; I was; I will have been and, I would have been, are all perfect tenses that will use haber as an auxiliary verb. In both English and Spanish, the perfect tenses are formed by using haber, followed by the past participle (el participio in Spanish). In English, the participle typically is formed by adding -ed to the end of verbs; the Spanish participle, which has origins related to the English participle, typically is formed by adding -ado for -ar verbs and -ido for -er and -ir verbs. The verb tense in the perfect tenses is decided by which simple tense of haber is being used: for example if we said: I have eaten and I will have eaten the only way to distinguish between the two would be the tense of the auxiliary verb being used; I have eaten = he comido and I will have eaten = habr

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Spanish Language Practice / Páginas de ayuda para estudiar español(Enrique Yepes, Bowdoin)

Spanish Language Practice / Páginas de ayuda para estudiar español(Enrique Yepes, Bowdoin) | Spanish Grammar | Scoop.it
Spanish Grammar Explanations, Exercises, and Practice Materials to learn Spanish. Intermediate and Advanced levels. Answers provided.

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12 Traditional Games in Spanish

12 Traditional Games in Spanish | Spanish Grammar | Scoop.it
Traditional games in Spanish teach vocabulary, grammar and culture. These 12 games incorporate language, so kids learn as they play.

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Spanish Lesson Beginner 24 The Spanish verb “Gustar” (To like ...

Today we are going to look in detail at the Spanish verb “Gustar” (To like). This is a very commonly used verb which doesn´t work in the same way as the other Spanish verbs we have previously seen. Although it ends in –AR, ...

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Spanish Grammar Strategies

Spanish Grammar Strategies | Spanish Grammar | Scoop.it

Grammar strategies are thoughts and actions that are primarily aimed at improving students' grammatical accuracy.  This site offer different strategies to learn specific grammatical points in Spanish


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