Translation- Poetry
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Recycling Outlook for Latin America

Recycling Outlook for Latin America | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it
Latin America has one of the highest rates of urbanization in the world (80% urban population). By 2050, 90% of Latin America’s population will live in urban areas.

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Alberto Ribas-Casasayas's curator insight, January 7, 2014 10:34 AM

Interesting outlook on the waste management crisis in Latin American cities

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Indígenas paralizan una mina colombiana por daños ambientales

Indígenas paralizan una mina colombiana por daños ambientales | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it
La producción de ferroníquel en la mina de Cerro Matoso, la segunda abastecedora del mineral a nivel mundial y propiedad de BHP Billiton, fue suspendida por una protesta de indígenas que bloquearon el ingreso y la salida al complejo ubicado en el...

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Alberto Ribas-Casasayas's curator insight, January 15, 2014 4:35 PM

El tema de este artículo está relacionado con _También la lluvia_ de Iciar Bollaín, que veremos la próxima semana.  Estas victorias judiciales contra grandes compañías son poco comunes. 

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The US war on drugs and its legacy in Latin America

The US war on drugs and its legacy in Latin America | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it
As the US softens its stance on drugs at home, David Huey reviews the effects of its tactics to dismantle cartels in Latin America and the implications for policymakers

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Alberto Ribas-Casasayas's curator insight, February 3, 2014 7:29 PM

An interesting op-ed from Colombian-based NGO consultant David Huey.

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Education – Towards Dialogue: A Linguistic Ethnographic Study of Classroom Interaction and Change | Faculti

Education – Towards Dialogue: A Linguistic Ethnographic Study of Classroom Interaction and Change | Faculti | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it
Dr. Julia Snell, Kings College, London
Towards Dialogue: A Linguistic Ethnographic Study of Classroom Interaction and Change
(ESRC RES-061-25-0363)
Lefstein, A. & J. Snell (forthcoming in 2013)

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Phil Chappell's curator insight, December 1, 2013 6:25 PM

Video report on this project by Julie Snell. Data collected from 75 lessons; one of the main findings was successful attempt to import Discourse Genres from outside the classroom; resulted in extended student interactions; students interacting with each other; "non-pupil like interactional privileges"; sometimes led to narrowing of learning opportunities through distraction though; shifts in power relations; teachers have to plan carefully the talk that they want to occur. Dialogic teaching is multidimensional; one important dimension is the content of the talk rather than the form of the talk. Balancing content and social relations is key. Lots of other factors impact on classroom talk. Dialogic teaching raises tensions and dilemmas for teachers and students. Great 13 minute summary of an important study! Loads of relevance for ELT.

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How To Revive An Extinct Language | Rosetta Translation

How To Revive An Extinct Language | Rosetta Translation | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it
We've read about endangered and minority languages and how many people are passionate about keeping these languages alive. But what about languages that have not had the same linguistic forces behind them and ...

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Scotland Tonight: Is spending £25m on promoting Gaelic justifiable?

Scotland Tonight: Is spending £25m on promoting Gaelic justifiable? | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it
Campaigners say the language is part of Scotland's heritage and must be saved.

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Clive Young's curator insight, October 9, 2013 7:02 PM

Well-balanced video report, not just about Gaelic but Scots and other languages, too.

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Of dialects, armies and navies

Of dialects, armies and navies | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it
YESTERDAY'S post on Cantonese touched a few nerves. A blog post is a very compressed medium, and I said some things briefly that I still stand by but which deserve a...

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Clive Young's curator insight, January 26, 2014 5:23 PM

Interesting Economist article from 2010 about the 'differences' between dialects and languages.

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Cardiff Research Group on Politics of Translating

Coordinator: Professor Alexis Nuselovici (Nouss)

What the history of translation, the history of poems, the history of major translations of major poems show is that identity is not opposed to alterity, but that identity is formed solely through alterity.

Henri Meschonnic, Ethics and Politics of Translating [Éthique et politique du traduire, Lagrasse : Verdier, 2007] (Translation : P.P. Boulanger)

Translating because the Cardiff Research Group on Politics of Translating’s (CRGPT) research emphasis is on the ethical as well as the socio-historical dimensions of translation considered as a basic human activity.   
Politics because any human relation occurring through language, any linguistic relation takes on political dimensions and translation, linking together different linguistic and cultural systems, deepens those dimensions. 

The CRGPT aims to investigate them through various translational realities and to create a forum for discussing them.

Group activities6 April 2011 Public lecture: Latin American cultural identity in the diasporic written press23 March 2011 Public lecture: Translating Paul Eluard’s political poetry in socialist Bulgaria23 February 2011 Public lecture:Translating the Intellectual in Britain: the Cenotaph Yob and other representations of dissent‘Translating (at) the Border’ conference (30 April 2010)


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Translated poetry challenges meaning

Translated poetry challenges meaning | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it

Translating poetry is both an art and a debate. Opinions differ on what precisely a word means to begin with, and better yet, what word in the English tongue most effectively approximates the original word's meaning. As ModFest founder Adene Wilson '69 explained, "You have to understand the culture of the language you're working from, so that you understand the subtleties of the moods and sentences."
Students delivered their various interpretations of poems in this year's "Readings: Translation as an Art." The interdepartmental readings were performed on Wednesday, Jan. 25 at 5 p.m. as part of Vassar's annual ModFest.


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Poetry and translation: The art of dead men writing to each other

Poetry and translation: The art of dead men writing to each other | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it
“Things do not connect; they correspond … that is how we dead men write to each other,” 20th century American poet Jack Spicer noted on the art of translating poetry in his early collection of works “After Lorca.”...

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Ollin Ollin's comment, March 5, 2014 11:20 PM
Translation, transliteration, transcription, transcreation... this is a wonderfully rich topic.<br>
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In other words: Translating poetry, an unsung art | Egypt Independent

In other words: Translating poetry, an unsung art | Egypt Independent | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it
The years I worked as a translator were some of the most frustrating of my career. I would often spend hours upon hours looking up a single word. From one dictionary to the next, I would try to guess which synonym best communicated the author’s intentions. Having resolved the lexical issues in the text, I would then turn to the syntactical dilemma of making each sentence sound like it was originally written in the target language, not awkwardly put together.

When laboring studiously on an incomprehensible text or trying to gracefully break up a paragraph-long sentence, I often thought of myself as “The Unknown Soldier” whose efforts were going unnoticed. I hoped that these efforts would be revealed in due time; I pictured myself receiving a newly-founded Nobel Prize in Translation, for choosing the perfect synonym and breaking up the sentence flawlessly. Since I was translating newspaper articles at the time, the award hasn’t arrived — at least not yet.

But last week it was raining recognition for translators, not in the form of a Nobel Prize for myself, but rather when Sinan Antoon received the 2012 National Translation Award for his translation of Mahmoud Darwish’s “In the Presence of Absence.” Then later in the same week, the American University in Cairo’s Center for Translation Studies jumpstarted its celebration of the Translator’s Day (15 October, coinciding with the birthday of the founder of Egypt’s first house of translation Rifaa Tahtawi) with a lecture by Randa Abou-Bakr, Professor of English Literature at Cairo University. The lecture was entitled “Translating Poetry in the Age of Prose.”

Abou-Bakr is a brilliant scholar and translator, not only because she was one of my favorite professors as an undergraduate student, but her work speaks volumes about her experience with and passion for poetry, translation and literature in general. She has authored “The Conflict of Voices in the Poetry of Dennis Brutus and Mahmoud Darwish” and translated Ahmed Bekheit’s “Leila the Honey of Solitude.”

The two main questions Abou-Bakr tackled during her talk were, “Is translating poetry at all possible” and, “Why does translating poetry matter?” Although American poet Robert Frost once said, “Poetry is what gets lost in translation,” Abou-Bakr tells us that theoreticians have suggested several strategies to deal with the multi-layered nature of poetry in ways that are both meaningful and beautiful. One way is to prioritize and centralize one of its elements over the others; for example, the sounds, the meaning, or the meter. Others believe in approximating: adopting an approach of dealing with a large variety of elements all at once. Abou-Bakr however, subscribes to another school of translation, namely focusing on the emotional resonance of the poem.

“I like to keep my translations as close as possible to the originals in the sense that I do not try to be a poet on my own, but rather claim to myself that I am the prophet who has received a certain revelation — not a message — and I am now being trusted with the sacred task of transmitting it to others.” The smooth flow and rhythm of Brutus' original South African poem was indeed retained in Abou-Bakr’s translation into Arabic, which she shared with the audience.

As for the second question of why translating poetry matters, in order to answer it, Abou-Bakr had to explain why literary translation matters in the first place. Translation of literature, she argued, was “one of the most fertile areas of cultural exchanges: it is a tool for understanding how cultures are interconnected as well as fragmented.” The act of translation itself can manifest the dynamics between two cultures, such as when a translator chooses to either domesticate or exoticize the text as she renders it into the target language.


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Is poetry lost or found in translation? - The Japan Times

Is poetry lost or found in translation? - The Japan Times | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it

The Japan TimesIs poetry lost or found in translation?


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Campesinas de Chile enseñarán agroecología a la región - IPS Agencia de Noticias

Campesinas de Chile enseñarán agroecología a la región - IPS Agencia de Noticias | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it
Una organización que reúne a unas 10.000 mujeres campesinas e indígenas de Chile lanza un instituto de agroecología para el campesinado femenino del sur am

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Alberto Ribas-Casasayas's curator insight, January 7, 2014 11:42 AM

Interesante iniciativa por la integración económica de las mujeres y por la agricultura adaptada al entorno.

 

Uno de los males más graves causados por la economía colonial y postcolonial se debió a los cambios en las prácticas agrícolas impuesto por la conquista española, así como la economía de los monocultivos, que se remonta a las grandes plantaciones de caña, tabaco y algodón en el siglo XVIII pero que cotinúa existiendo en el siglo XXI: café, banana, hoja de coca, entres otras...  

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How the U.S. is Losing Latin America - IVN.us

How the U.S. is Losing Latin America - IVN.us | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it
Recently, the US influence in Latin America has declined notably. America cannot afford to ignore its own backyard -- and here's why.

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Alberto Ribas-Casasayas's curator insight, February 17, 2014 8:50 PM

A columnist weighs in on declining U.S. influence in Latin America.  What do you think of the representation of Latin America as a "backyard"?  What forms has American "influence" taken in Latin America?

 

(To note, a few years ago, towards the end of Bush, Jr. presidency, the conservative magazine _Foreign Affairs_ already observed the phenomenon: http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/61372/peter-hakim/is-washington-losing-latin-america ; )

 

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The Curious Conundrum of the Code-switching Token Teacher - Huffington Post

The Curious Conundrum of the Code-switching Token Teacher - Huffington Post | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it
The Curious Conundrum of the Code-switching Token Teacher
Huffington Post
Originally used to explain language contact phenomena, in linguistics, to code-switch is to change between different languages during a single conversation.

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World's languages are dying | UNESCO Languages of the world

World's languages are dying | UNESCO Languages of the world | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it

"Experts say half of the world's 7,000 languages may be extinct by the end of this century. People lose the ability to speak their local language, as well as the cultural knowledge these languages hold, when they switch to global languages, such as English. "


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Does the United Kingdom Have a Language Policy? John M. Kirk (2008)


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Allan Massie: Gaelic will only be a hobby language

Allan Massie: Gaelic will only be a hobby language | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it
The indulgent pretence surrounding Gaelic does nothing to halt the language’s decline and amounts to intellectual dishonesty, writes Allan Massie

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Clive Young's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:22 PM

Anti-Gaelic rant - prejudice is alive and well.

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Catalunya Ràdio ha deixat d'arribar al País Valencià a les vuit del vespre

Catalunya Ràdio ha deixat d'arribar al País Valencià a les vuit del vespre | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it

From EUROLANG: The Spanish government has this evening shut down the last remaining Catalan radio stations in Valencia, Catalunya Radio and Catalunya Informacio. There is now no mass media in the region's own language. Furthermore, because the language NGO, Acció Cultural del País Valencià (ELEN members), own the relay transmitters that broadcast the radio stations, they have been threatened with a 1 million euro fine to ensure that Catalan radio is taken off air immediately.


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Symposium explores dynamic relationship between poet and translator

Symposium explores dynamic relationship between poet and translator | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it

A distinguished writer noted for his leadership in the translation and preservation of ancient Vietnamese poetry is among those featured at Vanderbilt’s two-day “L’invitation au voyage”: A Symposium on Poetry and Translation.

John Balaban will deliver the opening address, “On Translating Vietnamese Poetry,” from 1 to 2:30 p.m. on March 23 at the Bishop Joseph Johnson Black Cultural Center. The author has deep roots to Southeast Asia that extend back to the Vietnam War. He will discuss his extensive work to preserve the Vietnamese culture through its writings, according to Rick Hilles, assistant professor of English at Vanderbilt and the symposium’s organizer.


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“But translating a poem is like covering a song” : Harriet Staff : Harriet the Blog : The Poetry Foundation

“But translating a poem is like covering a song” : Harriet Staff : Harriet the Blog : The Poetry Foundation | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it

David Orr at the New York Times Sunday Book Review has a great article on translating the poetry of Nobel laureate Tomas Tranströmer.


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Translating Poetry

Translating Poetry | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it

As translators, we know that one of the hardest things to translate is poetry.Rhyme, meter, cadence, word selection, rhythm: we could spend weeks on end trying to translate one short poem. A poem emerges from the unique combination of select words and makes use of the music of a specific language. How, then, should we face the task of translating poetry?


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Mo Yan, the Nobel and translation

Mo Yan, the Nobel and translation | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it
Mo Yan, the Nobel and translation

Almost all men and women of letters in Taiwan are glad Mo Yan, one of China's leading writers of the past half century, won this year's Nobel Prize for Literature last Thursday. Chinese the world over are happy one of them has finally won the prize, though he isn't the first Chinese-born writer Nobel laureate in belles lettres.
Gao Xingjian, who received French citizenship in 1997, was awarded the prize in 2000.

Mo Yan is best known in Taiwan for his novella “Red Sorghum,” which was adapted for a film by leading Chinese director Zhang Yimou that won the Golden Bear Award at the Berlin film festival in 1988. His book about the brutal violence that plagues the eastern China countryside is quite popular in Taiwan, where he has also made many friends. His friends, of course, are all convinced that he deserves the award. However, there is some complaint. Chen Fang-ming, professor of Taiwanese literature at National Chengchi University, is complaining that authors in Taiwan have written much more than their fellow men of letters in China, and yet the Swedish Academy has chosen Mo Yan, a mainland Chinese.

Professor Chang did not charge the Swedish jury with discrimination, but did ask, “Why should it be Mo Yan?”

It may be true that writers in Taiwan are much more prolific, but are their works good enough for a Nobel Prize in Literature? Few contemporary writers in Taiwan have published books truly worth reading. But the prize is awarded, more often than not, to works never considered to deserve it.

The real reason why no Taiwanese has been given the award is that Taiwanese works are all but totally unknown abroad. I am afraid the Swedish Academy jury does not read Chinese and jurors simply do not know there may be some authors in Taiwan who can be recommended as candidates in the first place. We have the problem of translation.

Strictly speaking, translation of literary works is impossible. The unique nuance in one language is lost in translation into another language, particularly not in the same language family. Poetry, in particular, defies translation. A Tang poem, for instance, can't be translated into any non-Chinese languages without sacrificing the original rhyming scheme and “level-and-oblique-tone” verse rhythm, which make Chinese poems uniquely admirable. One best thing the Japanese do to keep the uniqueness of Tang poetry is not to translate it but to read it in their mother tongue. And sometimes, reading a Tang poem in Japanese makes the reader better capture the deep-souled feelings of the poet than he can by reading it in Chinese. Japanese haiku can never be translated into any other language. English poetry translated into Chinese usually makes no sense. Liang Shih-chiu, the celebrated Shakespeare scholar, translated the blank verse and sonnets of the Bard of the Avon into Chinese, but even with his efficiency par excellence in both languages, he could not convey the beauty of Shakespearean poetry.


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The Benefits of Bilingualism

The Benefits of Bilingualism | Translation- Poetry | Scoop.it
Being bilingual makes you smarter and can have a profound effect on your brain.

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Ashlyn Kristine Brundy's comment, February 4, 2014 2:38 PM
It is very interesting that bilinguals’s brains are always active. It gives the brain a challenge to identify what language to use, and when you are speaking one language, the brain is also processing the second language. I also thought it was very interesting to see that bilinguals are better at performing tasks and that they are more efficient in their thought process and actions than monolinguals. This is a great article.