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Injecting risk behaviours, self-reported mental health and crime

Injecting risk behaviours, self-reported mental health and crime | sources to review | Scoop.it
This paper explores differences between two types of illicit drug users (heroin users and non-heroin users) in relation to injecting risk behaviours, self-reported mental health, driving and crime.
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2. Alcohol fuelled violence, alcohol related violence

In many towns in Australia, 'alcohol fuelled violence' is so commonly heard, we are now becoming desensitised to reacting to it at an emotional level. Tragically, more shocks are yet to come. Is al...
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Who should be educating us about alcohol-related violence?

Who should be educating us about alcohol-related violence? | sources to review | Scoop.it
Peter Miller discusses reducing alcohol-related harm in Geelong, Victoria, in The Conversation.
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Alcohol in Australia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Alcohol in Australia is commonly consumed and available at pubs, liquor stores, and grocery stores - all of which are private enterprises. Spirits (whiskey, brandy, rum, gin, vodka etc.) can be purchased at liquor stores, pubs, but most grocery stores do not sell them, although have on their premises separate liquor stores. Alcohol consumption is less, according to WHO studies, than most European countries and several Central Asian and African countries.[1]

Heavy drinking in Australia was a cultural norm since colonisation.[2] For a period convicts in Australia were partially paid with rum.[2] The distribution of rum amongst the New South Wales Corps led to the only successful armed takeover of an Australian government. It was later to become known as the Rum Rebellion of 1808.

In the 1830s, the Temperance Movement gained a following in the colony. Its influence peaked during World War I and the Great Depression. Alcohol sales were prohibited in the Australian Capital Territory between 1910 and 1928. Four referendum regarded prohibition of alcohol were conducted in Western Australia, including one in each of the years 1911, 1921, 1925 and 1950. In the decade after World War II there was a step rise in the consumption of beer in Australia.[3] In 1837, laws were passed to prevent Aboriginal access to alcohol as binge drinking became problematic.[4]

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Dr Michael Livingston's blog | NDARC - National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre

Dr Michael Livingston's blog | NDARC - National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre | sources to review | Scoop.it
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Demand for action over alcohol and violence

Seventy-six per cent of people believe Australia's problem with alcohol-related violence will worsen over the next five years, according to a survey by public health groups.
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The gendered trouble with alcohol: Young people managing alcohol related violence

International Journal of Drug Policy, Volume 23, Issue 3, Pages 236-241, May 2012, Authors:Jo Lindsay
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