Sorghum
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Sorghum yum

Like other slightly exotic grain crops, sorghum is used primarily for animal feed in the United States, although cultivation of this grain is on the rise. The seeds, stalks, and leaves can all be fed to livestock or left in the field and used as a forage crop. In the United States, a wet milling method is used to make sorghum starch, used in a variety of industrial applications such as adhesives and paper making. In much of the rest of the world, however, it is consumed by humans as well as animals.

Sorghum is favored by the gluten intolerant and is often cooked as a porridge to be eaten alongside other foods. The grain is fairly neutral in flavor, and sometimes slightly sweet. This makes it well adapted to a variety of dishes, because, like tofu, sorghum absorbs flavors well. It can also be eaten plain.

This grain is commonly eaten with the hull, which retains the majority of the nutrients. The plant is very high in fiber and iron, with a fairly high protein level as well. This makes it well suited to its use as a staple starch in much of the developing world.

Sorghum was probably brought to the United States by African slaves, who cultivated it in the Southern states. Some classic Southern recipes include sorghum, suggesting that it was integrated into American cuisine by the 19th century, when additional strains were brought over from China. The grain is also used around the world to brew beers, with its close relative, broom corn, cultivated for the manufacture of traditional straw brooms.

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Sorghum world staple

Sorghum is one of the top cereal crops in the world, along with wheat, oats, corn, rice, andbarley. It was originally cultivated in Egypt in antiquity; the largest producers of sorghum in the modern era are still in Africa, although the crop has spread to southern Asia and the Americas as well. In traditional form, sorghum is a towering plant over 6 feet (2 meters) tall, although many varieties designed for cultivation are dwarf breeds, specially designed for easy harvest. In Africa, however, traditional tall sorghum is still grown, and the stalks are put to a variety of uses.

An annual grass that is extremely drought tolerant, sorghum is an excellent choice for arid and dry areas. Sorghum has special adaptations to weather extremes and is a very stable source of nutrition as a result. It is most commonly red and hard when ripe and is usually dried after harvesting for longevity, as the grains are stored whole. It can be harvested mechanically, although higher crop losses will result if the sorghum is too moist.

Another type of sorghum, sweet sorghum, is grown for the manufacture of syrup. In the case of sweet sorghum, the stalks of the plant are harvested, rather than the seeds, and crushed like sugar cane or beets to produce sorghum syrup. After crushing, the syrup is cooked down to concentrate the natural sugars and packaged for sale.

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Sorghum

Molasses

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This article is about the plant genus. For the principal species used in crops, see Sorghum bicolor. For the commercial use of Sorghum species, see Commercial sorghum. For other uses, see Sorghum (disambiguation).SorghumScientific classificationKingdom:Plantae(unranked):Angiosperms(unranked):Monocots(unranked):CommelinidsOrder:PoalesFamily:PoaceaeSubfamily:PanicoideaeTribe:AndropogoneaeGenus:Sorghum
L.Species

About 30 species, see text

Sorghum is a genus of numerous species of grasses, one of which is raised for grain and many of which are used as fodder plants, either cultivated or as part of pasture. The plants are cultivated in warmer climates worldwide. Species are native to tropical and subtropical regions of all continents in addition to the southwest Pacific and Australasia. Sorghum is in the subfamily Panicoideae and the tribe of Andropogoneae (the tribe of big bluestem and sugar cane).

Contents  [hide] 1 Cultivation and uses2 Species3 Hybrids4 Sorghum genome5 See also6 References7 External linksCultivation and uses [edit]A sorghum field in Central America.

One species, Sorghum bicolor,[1] is an important world crop, used for food (as grain and in sorghum syrup or "sorghum molasses"), fodder, the production of alcoholic beverages, and biofuels. Most varieties are drought- and heat-tolerant, and are especially important in arid regions, where the grain is one of the staples for poor and rural people. These varieties form important components of pastures in many tropical regions.Sorghum bicolor is an important food crop in Africa, Central America, and South Asia and is the "fifth most important cereal crop grown in the world".[2]

Some species of sorghum can contain levels of hydrogen cyanide, hordenine and nitrates lethal to grazing animals in the early stages of the plant's growth. When stressed by drought or heat, plants can also contain toxic levels of cyanide and/or nitrates at later stages in growth.[3]

Another Sorghum species, Johnson grass (S. halapense), is classified as an invasive species in the US by the Department of Agriculture.[4]

Sorghum vulgare var. technicum is commonly called broomcorn.[5]

 

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Brown Sugar -- Food

Brown Sugar -- Food | Sorghum | Scoop.it
Watch Marthastewart's Brown Sugar Video. Watch more recipe and cooking how-to, step-by-step,and tutorial videos from MarthaStewart.com.
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